Anyone ever read it. More, has anyone ever followed one of the diet plans?

I searched the internet high and low, but didn't find anyone saying they followed the meal plans exactly.

It's a lot of coconut. I mean, I get coconut oil and coconut milk and shredded coconut, but she also has coconut vinegar and kefir coconut water and...well, it seems like a lot, even for a wonder-food.

I had my husband read it because Enig is a nutritionist and a scientist, and he cares about things like that a lot. He's slowly coming on board, he hasn't read a lot of the book yet, but he said that it spoke to him. I was able to convince him to put coconut oil in some rooiboos tea today (he declared it "not awful"), hopefully we'll find a method to solve his constant hunger pangs (aka sugar cravings).

He's in favor of following the weight-loss plan in the book. At 2500 calories it's about right for him (he's just of six feet and has about 60 pounds to lose). Since the menu was created by a nutritionist, he is more apt to adhere to it and not cheat by eating a whole quart of yogurt with raw sugar and walnuts in it at random times throughout the day. Because if I tell him not to snack he just doesn't listen to little me

I think I'm ready to jump into most of the plan, I have successfully made bone broth, beet kvass, kombucha, and sauerkraut. And her curry recipe looks a lot like the one already use. But parts of the menu are rather non-primal, like the soaked oatmeal and the sourdough bread. These things seem to be mostly carriers of butter and other assorted fats, any ideas about substitutions? I'm guessing she wants the large quantities of butter on a daily basis, but my husband keeps on specifying "nothing weird" on his plate, so I don't think slathering the butter on bacon is going to go over well with him.

Anyways, yea or nay to eating lots and lots of coconut in many different forms for weight loss? Yea or nay to Enig's meal plans?