Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: ITB issues page

  1. #1
    seaweed's Avatar
    seaweed is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    4,200

    ITB issues

    Primal Fuel
    i have this occasional real nasty stabbing pain in my right quad. it makes me involuntarily limp like an old lady. i can stop and do a quad stretch or just keep walking and it goes away. none of the massage therapists i have been to see have been able to pin it down. long story short, i think putting 2 and 2 together, it is my ITB. it is still only an occasional, once in a blue moon problem and i dont have any other ITB related issues but it is definitely tight if i try to rub it. I have started doing some stretches but is there anything else i can do to help it?

  2. #2
    Wanderlust's Avatar
    Wanderlust is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    808
    Try a roller foam
    "Go For Broke"
    Fat Kine-230/24% @ 6'2"
    Small Kine-168/9%
    Now- 200/8%
    Goal- 210/6%

  3. #3
    seaweed's Avatar
    seaweed is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    4,200
    they have them at my gym so i will try one when i am there next.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    49
    You probably don't have an ITB problem. The ITB is nothing but a long tendon and tendon is inert. The active (read changing) member in this chain is the Tensor Fascia Lata (TFL) muscle. It's located at the upper end of the ITB and is intermittently (for now) contracting in order to aid your tight hip flexor muscles.

    Here's where the story gets complex... If there's been no trauma to your hip flexors, then they, as well as the TFL, are adapting in order to protect something else - usually a bad neck. Any issues with headaches, pain between the shoulder blades, numb/tingley or painful hands, elbow pain, upper chest, shoulders, or even just the neck itself?

    If this IS an adaptive issue then you can roll that ITB until the cows come home and get nothing but temporary symptomatic relief. Unfortunately, it'll take you a while to realize that's all you're getting. You'll try more and more stretches with the same outcome. Massage and moist heat will yield the same result - short-term pain relief.

    If, in fact, there are a few adhesions along the ITB, then a simple roll or 2 will end the issue. If not, you need to link up with a chiropractor who works with measurement and correction of the CNS firing patterns which propogate postural adaptation. I call it being "corkscrewed" and address this issue multiple times in a day.

    Sorry for the cursory explanation. Not a great forum for discussion of a complex issue like sensory dysafferentation.

  5. #5
    seaweed's Avatar
    seaweed is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    4,200
    Here's where the story gets complex... If there's been no trauma to your hip flexors, then they, as well as the TFL, are adapting in order to protect something else - usually a bad neck. Any issues with headaches, pain between the shoulder blades, numb/tingley or painful hands, elbow pain, upper chest, shoulders, or even just the neck itself?
    No pain in any of those places either, other than an occasional tingle in my wedding ring finger on the other side to the ITB pain. it is also only an intermittant pain. i can go for several months without getting it, or get it every few days for a week sort of thing. and then not again for a month or two. i would say it is poss some form of mild corkscrew issue as my hips are slightly twisted from way too many years of carrying small children around and my right side is stronger than my left side. even tho i am left handed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    49
    Doesn't matter which side the pain/tingle is on - they match up approximately 50% of the time, so a coin toss. there's no one nerve that travels from the neck down to the thigh so I wasn't suggesting that the 2 are directly related. For decades, we've been telling women they're twisted due to carrying babies and telling men they're twisted due to carrying a wallet. Unfortunately, there's no correlation with these things at all. Made sense at the time, but under scrutiny - once again - a coin toss. There is, however, a great correlation with a twisted frame and abberant CNS control of the postural musculature. It's easily measurable and easily corrected.

    All constant issues began as intermittent issues. As the duration and severity of the episodes increase, the interval between them decrease. Voila - eventually it's constant. All it needs is time and inattention.

    Find a chiropractor in your area who uses a Surface EMG as a primary means of diagnosis. Pain or lack thereof will lie to you all day long. The SEMG will not.

    Good luck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •