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Thread: What the Hell is With People and Conveniece Foods? page 7

  1. #61
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    Yeah, some convenience foods make sense and canned pumpkin and tomatoes are just that. I go by time/value. I can cut up a pumpkin and cook it down. I can can tomatoes. I can make my own coconut milk. But it's just as easy (and relatively cheap) to buy those items.

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    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia1973 View Post
    Yeah, some convenience foods make sense and canned pumpkin and tomatoes are just that. I go by time/value. I can cut up a pumpkin and cook it down. I can can tomatoes. I can make my own coconut milk. But it's just as easy (and relatively cheap) to buy those items.
    +1

  3. #63
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    Not to mention canned tomatoes almost always taste better then fresh ones from the store! (Now my home grown and farmers market tomatoes were pretty darn awesome but store tomatoes? Might as well eat wax!)

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnolia1973 View Post
    Yeah, some convenience foods make sense and canned pumpkin and tomatoes are just that. I go by time/value. I can cut up a pumpkin and cook it down. I can can tomatoes. I can make my own coconut milk. But it's just as easy (and relatively cheap) to buy those items.
    So true.
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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragonmamma View Post
    Kitchens these days are small and crappy.
    Not only that, but what counter space we do have is filled with a bunch of stuff. On mine, I've got a microwave, butcher block, recipe books, dish drainer, coffee maker, fruit bowl, toaster (boyfriend's), bread box (also his) and iced tea pot.
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  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    With a full-time job, grad school, and a number of volunteer commitments, I hope that I can be forgiven for using canned organic pumpkin (pure pumpkin, not pie filling) and a can of organic tomatoes now and then, especially when things like fresh tomatoes cost a fortune here in winter. I believe in cooking real food from scratch as much as possible, but I'm not going to feel guilty about buying pureed pumpkin when doing that lets me do things like walk my dog, spend time with my spouse, and serve my community. And no, I don't watch television.
    This is just a perfect example of not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good...
    Breathe. Move forward.

    I just eat what I want...

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by labbygail View Post
    I'm a working mom (only 35 hours a week, however some of those are weekend and evening hours) and I have to say that it's not in our culture to make the commitment it takes to plan and execute home-cooked meals.
    Sometimes by the time I'm done putting my son to bed it's 9:00 at night, and then I groan about having to go make lunches. My husband does other chores that I'd rather not do, like laundry, so I'm not complaining. However, some nights I do bemoan my lack of "me-time" (which I think was perhaps a foreign concept to generations past). Sometimes I legitimately need some time off my feet--I teach afternoon and evening school--or maybe some plain old unstructured time, but usually it's just cultural conditioning, the idea that adults are entitled to some time in which they can do whatever they feel like doing instead of entertaining a preschooler, working, and doing chores. I don't mean that I should be a martyr but rather that I'm not entitled to sit and read a book when there are lunches that need to be made. But that's not a commitment everyone is willing to make. People have different priorities.

    I have to say that even though lunches are hard, dinner is actually easy. On my long days, my best friend is the crockpot. Coming home to hot dinner is like a present to myself. But that also takes commitment, because to put it up in the morning requires that I don't stay up late watching TV or going out with friends. I wouldn't call it a sacrifice...just priorities.
    This. It is priorities. I homeschool my daughter and own my own business I basically work very part-time at it so I can spend the majority of my time with my daughter. I cook every meal or pack our lunch when we are going out. I don't have free-time like many people today think of it. My free time is with my family. I wouldn't have it any other way. I enjoy cooking for my family. Even though I used to hate cooking with a passion. The only thing I don't enjoy is making my husband's big ass salad for his lunch each day. LOL Not sure why but by the time it's time to make it at night I just feel like I am DONE. I don't watch television so that saves hours a day. All of my friends with kids are paleo and we all cook our own meals, make yogurt, kefir, fermented veggies, grind our own almond flour. It does not take all that long and I find it peaceful. The more "traditional" activities I do the more relaxed and content I feel. My neighbors think I'm pretty weird because of the food I make for the kids when they visit or come to a party but I don't care. I'd rather be the weird healthy lady.

  8. #68
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    I am amazed at the sheer number of folks (even here in farm country) who simply don't know how to cook, no matter the way they missed that bit of practical education.

    I am a SAHM, but have a disabled daughter (with wicked food issues) we commute to therapy with, at least twice weekly, to a neighboring city, which means I have a kind of part-time job. Another daughter is a dairy-allergic celiac. My oldest and I are sensitive to artificial food additives. And I am not independently wealthy (food budget). All that means I have to cook fresh from home a lot.

    My folks both were cooks. Their ingredients were crappy (white bread, margarine, jelly, canned vegetables, canned fruit cocktail... the whole SAD thing), but they made soups and stews and baked homemade pie crust and cookies and lots of other stuff, so I did get a cooking education, if not an education in nutrition.

    I made sure my four kids were in the kitchen from the very beginning. First I was concerned with taste education: whole, fresh foods first, junk almost never. Then we went into actual cooking skills, along with shopping skills. Today, I leave chores for my oldest two on the dry-erase board that say something like this: roast 2 chickens at 5 p.m. Make guacamole. Bake bread (from scratch - my oldest does that, not the celiac; and my family isn't Primal, just me...). Prep fresh broccoli. And it all gets done. Yeah, three of the four are homeschooled, and that helps with the time thing.

    My girls are growing up with the same food education, but are naturally turning out differently from one another just due to personality differences, so to that poster who has the 19YO who only eats WalMart crap, don't take full responsibility for that one - could just be her. My first is an incredible baker, but really doesn't like to "cook", for example, much to my chagrin, even though she loves to EAT whatever anybody else cooks. At least she will be an educated eater.

    I am also a supporter of mealtime with the family. Barring episodes of emergencies and "life" stuff that happens to all of us, if you can't manage to get the family together for dinner - a from-scratch dinner - your priorities are out of whack.

    We make projects of making stuff like pumpkin pie from fresh pumpkin, and grinding flour, and everything else, just so we all know how it is done - my personal thing - even though we don't do this constantly.

    Like Primal123, I relish my label as the weird-food lady. Better than being at the mercy of Kraft...

    Maybe like some kind of awful Darwinian natural selection, Primal-paleo-ancestrals will be the last ones standing after everybody else has expired from the diseases of civilization. Sometimes I think of that. Don't wish it on anybody, but I do think of it, when I wonder how the hell humanity has managed to survive through millennia without 100-calorie-packs and heart-smart margarines and calcium-added orange juice drinks and Flintstones vitamins...

  9. #69
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    I think there's a distinct difference between the types of convenience foods. For the person who hates chopping, if getting pre-cut lettuce or salad packs gets them to eat veggies, that's great! While my great grandmother's tomato sauce took days to prepare, one generation later, my grandmother used canned chopped tomatoes and tomato paste. It still took a whole day because of all the meats, etc. she put in it, but to her, those canned tomato products were such a time saver. Her granddaughter uses frozen veggies because I'm a one person family, and my alternatives are to use frozen or shop every day for fresh. I've thrown away too much fresh produce over the years to not use frozen for some things.

    But, when you get into things like enchilada dinners (which are really delicious when you're stoned), or any prepared dinner, you're getting into additives. Pre-made toasts are jaw droppingly weird and make me go, "hmmm..." Veggies that come with sauces so all you have to do is pop them in the microwave seem to be over the top, and while I've never read the labels, I'm guessing there's a lot of crap in those.

    So, I think it's all about ingredients. If you look, and your canned tomatoes have ingredients: tomatoes, you're doing nothing harmful. If you look at something like tomato sauce, and the list of ingredients has things like canola oil and chemicals, then you'd be choosing convenience over healthy. Not a great choice if you can help it. And we almost always can if we just rethink things.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I think there's a distinct difference between the types of convenience foods. For the person who hates chopping, if getting pre-cut lettuce or salad packs gets them to eat veggies, that's great! While my great grandmother's tomato sauce took days to prepare, one generation later, my grandmother used canned chopped tomatoes and tomato paste. It still took a whole day because of all the meats, etc. she put in it, but to her, those canned tomato products were such a time saver. Her granddaughter uses frozen veggies because I'm a one person family, and my alternatives are to use frozen or shop every day for fresh. I've thrown away too much fresh produce over the years to not use frozen for some things.

    But, when you get into things like enchilada dinners (which are really delicious when you're stoned), or any prepared dinner, you're getting into additives. Pre-made toasts are jaw droppingly weird and make me go, "hmmm..." Veggies that come with sauces so all you have to do is pop them in the microwave seem to be over the top, and while I've never read the labels, I'm guessing there's a lot of crap in those.

    So, I think it's all about ingredients. If you look, and your canned tomatoes have ingredients: tomatoes, you're doing nothing harmful. If you look at something like tomato sauce, and the list of ingredients has things like canola oil and chemicals, then you'd be choosing convenience over healthy. Not a great choice if you can help it. And we almost always can if we just rethink things.
    I completely agree with you. There is a difference between convince because it saves tons of time (a day) versus wanting to pop a premade meal directly into the oven. We use canned tomatoes and frozen vegetables frequently because they are many times cheaper than buying fresh and we can stock up since they don't go bad. Getting on people for buying canned or frozen veggies that are pure veggies seems a bit over the top. As you say, it's a long leap from there to frozen lasagna or pizza.

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