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Thread: Carb quandry - feeling discouraged and need advice. page 3

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcadav View Post
    Do you have the reference range for each test? They are usually next to the results, in parenthesis. For example:
    TSH: 2.15 (.33-3.3)
    I do not have the reference range, but I did look the ranges up on the internet. They seem to be "in range" but T3 is on the low side. Less than 2.3 is considered hypo, and it's at 2.9 so just barely above it. The top of the range for free T3 is 4.2. And I know from past tests that my normal TSH should be around 1, not 2.1.

  2. #22
    Goldie's Avatar
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    Get a different doctor.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goldie View Post
    Get a different doctor.
    I'm going to. This is so frustrating. I'm going to make an appt with a Naturopath that's a little over an hour away. Maybe they will be more apt to listen, because I just know that this isn't right. This isn't normal for me.

  4. #24
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    You need to go and read this website Thyroid Mistreatment, Hypothyroidism Scandals, and Thyroid Treatment Problems | Stop The Thyroid Madness

    And get a new doctor - and if your naturopath doesn't put you on Vitamin D, Selenium, Zinc and Magnesium (and probably Iodine) - find another naturopath.

    :-)

  5. #25
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    You need another doctor. If your T3 is 'on the low side,' that could be the cause of any weight issues--as I know from experience. And someone who is taking Rx thyroid should have a TSH of 1.0 or below. Although in someone who is not taking Rx thyroid, a TSH of 2.1 is not usually an issue, most good thyroid doctors will treat someone who has a TSH above 2.0 and also has symptoms. That doctor will also test, and consider, T4 and T3 levels.

    Your T3 should ideally be in the top 2/3 of the lab range, although I do fine if it's at least half way.

    To illustrate the 'power' of T3, I have Hashimoto's, and, according to my endo, one characteristic of Hashi's is to experience 'conversion problems'--i.e., the T4 isn't converted to T3 sufficiently. The first time that happened, I was so fatigued that I could barely function--and although I had been steadily losing a pound a week, I suddenly gained 10 lbs in 2 weeks with NO change in diet or exercise. When the labs came back, my T3 had dropped below the lab range!

    I have since had that happen twice more (each time, my endo increases my T3 dose), and when my T3 tanks, in order NOT to gain, I have to eat about 500 cal a day until I get my dose adjusted. It's the T3 that controls metabolism and other bodily functions.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rueben View Post
    You need to go and read this website Thyroid Mistreatment, Hypothyroidism Scandals, and Thyroid Treatment Problems | Stop The Thyroid Madness

    And get a new doctor - and if your naturopath doesn't put you on Vitamin D, Selenium, Zinc and Magnesium (and probably Iodine) - find another naturopath.

    :-)
    Thank you for this! I have read this website before, but I'm going to read it again and make sure I'm armed with all the info I can get my hands on.

    Quote Originally Posted by emmie View Post
    You need another doctor. If your T3 is 'on the low side,' that could be the cause of any weight issues--as I know from experience. And someone who is taking Rx thyroid should have a TSH of 1.0 or below. Although in someone who is not taking Rx thyroid, a TSH of 2.1 is not usually an issue, most good thyroid doctors will treat someone who has a TSH above 2.0 and also has symptoms. That doctor will also test, and consider, T4 and T3 levels.

    Your T3 should ideally be in the top 2/3 of the lab range, although I do fine if it's at least half way.

    To illustrate the 'power' of T3, I have Hashimoto's, and, according to my endo, one characteristic of Hashi's is to experience 'conversion problems'--i.e., the T4 isn't converted to T3 sufficiently. The first time that happened, I was so fatigued that I could barely function--and although I had been steadily losing a pound a week, I suddenly gained 10 lbs in 2 weeks with NO change in diet or exercise. When the labs came back, my T3 had dropped below the lab range!

    I have since had that happen twice more (each time, my endo increases my T3 dose), and when my T3 tanks, in order NOT to gain, I have to eat about 500 cal a day until I get my dose adjusted. It's the T3 that controls metabolism and other bodily functions.
    Thanks emmie! After I found out those numbers, it's all making sense to me now. I have been literally KILLING myself with workouts and eating a good, healthy diet and I know for a fact that if my numbers were optimal for me, I would have no problem losing this weight. I'm pretty upset that my doc won't even consider treating me even with low dose hormones. I thought he was a great doc when I first went to see him, but now not so much. I have been doing some reading on "Low T3 Syndrome" and I'm wondering if that might be what's going on for me. Seems the cause of it could be related to the output of pituitary hormones, which would make sense in my case. When I was pregnant with my second set of twins, I was hospitalized for a very, very bad migraine for almost a week. They did an MRI and saw that my pituitary was extremely enlarged....which is normal for pregnancy, but not as big as mine was. They thought it was a tumor, a macroadenoma. Come to find out now after getting another MRI recently, I do not have a tumor but my pituitary was just extremely enlarged. I'm wondering if it was somehow damaged from all that swelling and maybe isn't putting out the right amount of hormones to my thyroid to keep it functioning optimally. In my reading about low T3 syndrome, it mentioned that it affects pregnant women many times and that it's not actually an issue with the thyroid, but with the pituitary and/or hypothalamus. So, things started to click for me, it can't just all be coincidence.

    Anyway, I'm going to take all this info to the naturopath and see what they say. In the mean time, I have ordered Thyroid Synergy through my lame doc, so that will at least support the thyroid and help with T4 to T3 conversion until I get more answers and know better what to do.

  7. #27
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    Yes, if your thyroid hormones are low, you really should not be working out strenuously at all. It further depletes the thyroid.

    That's really interesting about your pituitary. They've shown that a low T3 is common in hospitalized patients are are very ill, but the hormone level returns to normal when they get well. However, you are quite right that your pituitary may have sufferent damage that prevents its signaling the thyroid to produce the level of hormone you need.

    I hope you get some answers. Good thyroid doctors are not common, and I've been very lucky to find a good one (I got a tip from a family friend who is a well-known pathologist).

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