To be frank I'm not sure it does. You could look at and reflect on contemporary violence even if you didn't know the Amazon existed. But FWIW:

In the tribal societies of the Amazon forest, violent conflict accounted for 30 percent of all deaths before contact with Europeans, according to a recent study by University of Missouri anthropologist Robert Walker. Understanding the reasons behind those altercations in the Amazon sheds light on the instinctual motivations that continue to drive human groups to violence ...
Here is what he sees as the main reasons for violence in pre-contact Amazonian societies and thinks are still major drivers today. (I guess it might be more interesting to look for differences, but anyway ..):

"The same reasons - revenge, honor, territory and jealousy over women - that fueled deadly conflicts in the Amazon continue to drive violence in today's world," said Walker, lead author and assistant professor of anthropology in MU's College of Arts and Science. ...
Amazonian tribal warfare sheds light on modern violence, says MU anthropologist