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Thread: Low-fat "light" Yogurts. I assume they're crap/bad. But exactly how?

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  1. #1
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    Low-fat "light" Yogurts. I assume they're crap/bad. But exactly how?

    Just how even "health" cereals are just low-fat, high-carb, I assume these yogurts are not Primal and are bad. Can someone give me the once over for all of these fruit yogurts that are marketed as healthy, when I know they're not? The obvious ones are loaded with sugar, but some are more vague:

    Light & Fit® Greek - Dannon Light & Fit®

    This one is 80 calories. What's the deal with being sweetened with fructose, sucralose and acesulfame potassium, ?

    Low fat, fine. Low calories, fine.

    I see it's got sugar/carbs. But at only 80 calories, how bad can it be?
    How much is from natural fructose in the fruit vs. added sucrose, etc.
    Also, artificial sweeteners are bad how? Blocking leptin/grehlin/peptide X?

  2. #2
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    It's probably bad. If I understand it correctly, yogurt isn't primal. I eat yogurt, but I wouldn't eat this one - low fat isn't fine and all this extra garbage isn't fine.
    Last edited by anna5; 10-02-2012 at 09:52 AM.

  3. #3
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    I'm not feeling like I have a good enough handle to explain all the sciency bits.

    I will say that one of the biggest problems I have, or people in general have, with artificial sweeteners is that they are WAY MORE sweet than any naturally occurring sugar. As we consume more and more of the artificial sweeteners, we become more and more immune to sweetness, to the point where things like honey or fruit no longer taste "sweet enough" for our tastebuds. We need to have ever escalating amounts of sweetener to get the same good sweet feeling. Just like a drug. >.<

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by qqemokitty View Post
    I'm not feeling like I have a good enough handle to explain all the sciency bits.

    I will say that one of the biggest problems I have, or people in general have, with artificial sweeteners is that they are WAY MORE sweet than any naturally occurring sugar. As we consume more and more of the artificial sweeteners, we become more and more immune to sweetness, to the point where things like honey or fruit no longer taste "sweet enough" for our tastebuds. We need to have ever escalating amounts of sweetener to get the same good sweet feeling. Just like a drug. >.<
    I have heard that the sugar free sweeteners make some people crave sweets more. So this is something to watch for. I definitely limit my intake of them, but don't seem to have a problem with occasional use. Some may though.

  5. #5
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    They contain sugar and they are low fat. That's a double whammy! Even if it contains sugar substitute, which some people use and some don't, it's still low fat which is going to leave you hungry very quickly. If you're looking to do a low cal CW diet I imagine that this is something you might want to eat. I don't think it's the worst thing in the world, but its definitely not primal. Try Greek yogurt (plain, full fat) and sweeten it with honey. If I don't want the extra calories I will occasionally sweeten my Greek yogurt with sugar-free preserves.

  6. #6
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    Did you read the label?
    There are like a dozen ingredients.
    Milk from factory cows... not organic, fed soy, likely shot full of rBST.
    Corn starch... GMO.
    A bunch of preservatives...
    How is that anything close to a good natural product?

    I certainly wouldn't eat it.


    Lots of people here eat yogurt and fermented milk products(including store bought greek yogurts... just NOT that one.)
    Some even consume milk, though that tends to be raw, grassfed, local dairy.

    What you need to now about Dairy... read this.
    The Definitive Guide to Dairy | Mark's Daily Apple

    Then make your decision.


    Most of the time I make my own yogurt from raw, local, grassfed dairy. I do understand that that process is not for everyone though.
    In my house... there is sometimes also store bought full fat plain Greek yogurt from a company that used NO rBST/BGH. The ingredients are: Milk, cultures.
    Nothing else.
    I also suggest organic if you can get it.

    Plain yogurt is very easy to flavor... just add some fruit and a little bit of honey, maybe a sprinkle of nuts if you wish... delicious.
    I also like to add a little bit of vanilla bean paste to mine. So good.
    Last edited by cori93437; 10-02-2012 at 10:09 AM.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  7. #7
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    Ok so the low fat isn't bad. Especially since it's not organic it's actually better. But corn starch and fructose and diarrhea in the yogurt is probably not very good
    well then

  8. #8
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    gadsie's dead-on right. nothing wrong with low fat. lots of dairy products are traditionally low fat when they're made, as the fat from milk is often reserved for cream or butter. it's all the other crap you have to watch out for!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakey View Post
    gadsie's dead-on right. nothing wrong with low fat. lots of dairy products are traditionally low fat when they're made, as the fat from milk is often reserved for cream or butter. it's all the other crap you have to watch out for!
    This always gets me...
    tra·di·tion·al/trəˈdiSHənl/
    Adjective:
    Existing in or as part of a tradition; long-established.
    Produced, done, or used in accordance with tradition.

    As a part of what "tradition"?
    Mostly a modern, electrical, big cow dairy farm, readily available refrigeration tradition...

    Before modern times it depended on location, climate, season, and status.
    If you were a regular farmer with a milk cow in a temperate zone, in the cool months, sure you skimmed the cream and saved it a few days to gather with the cream from other days, then made some butter.
    If you were rich and rand a large farm with hands to run a small dairy, those folks skimmed daily... possibly even in summer... because they didn't have to gather together several days worth of cream to get enough for a single batch. This was for rich people.
    But in the summer if you were a regular guy with a milk cow, you didn't skim that cream and save it for several days to get a batch to beat into butter... it would rot. You made yogurt, or cottage cheese, that day... at full fat and ate it. Or sold it, or traded it... Because to do otherwise was a waste.
    In other places where people didn't have cattle, and instead had sheep or goats (The first yogurts were from goat milk) there was no skimming unless the milk could be held at very cold refrigerator like temperatures for 3-4 days. Because goats and sheeps milk does not separate like cow dairy.

    Cow dairy taking over the world as the primary dairy is sort of modern as well... it goes hand in hand with that refrigeration.
    Back before that more people could afford and could feed a few family goats or sheep.
    Cows take a nice large pasture, sheep a rather smaller lot, goats... they will thrive on rocky ground and prefer scrub.

    Traditional... is a funny thing.

    Sure there is a place for some "low fat" dairy products... just don't forget why they exist.
    They were made when it was convenient for the people making them, seasonally.
    And according to location, type of dairy... so in some regions the people really never ate any low fat dairy at all... because it was very, very hard to separate the cream of the type of dairy they used.
    Butter and the skimming of cream didn't become a regular thing unless it was in a very rich household until the advent of modern times.
    The butter and cream went to the rich guy, or the cow owner in the seasons he was lucky enough to treat himself. The low fat left overs went to the kitchen maids and the dogs or pigs, or into the cow owners wife's cooking pot if she was really frugal... which she likely was.

    Even when large farms came about, and early factory processing came about, before milk trucks were refrigerated there were often entire summer deliveries of milk that were too clabbered by the time they reached the factory to be skimmed. They were used whole for full fat cheeses.
    So still seasonal... until very recently.
    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cori93437 View Post
    This always gets me...
    tra·di·tion·al/trəˈdiSHənl/
    Adjective:
    Existing in or as part of a tradition; long-established.
    Produced, done, or used in accordance with tradition.

    As a part of what "tradition"?
    Mostly a modern, electrical, big cow dairy farm, readily available refrigeration tradition...

    Before modern times it depended on location, climate, season, and status.
    If you were a regular farmer with a milk cow in a temperate zone, in the cool months, sure you skimmed the cream and saved it a few days to gather with the cream from other days, then made some butter.
    If you were rich and rand a large farm with hands to run a small dairy, those folks skimmed daily... possibly even in summer... because they didn't have to gather together several days worth of cream to get enough for a single batch. This was for rich people.
    But in the summer if you were a regular guy with a milk cow, you didn't skim that cream and save it for several days to get a batch to beat into butter... it would rot. You made yogurt, or cottage cheese, that day... at full fat and ate it. Or sold it, or traded it... Because to do otherwise was a waste.
    In other places where people didn't have cattle, and instead had sheep or goats (The first yogurts were from goat milk) there was no skimming unless the milk could be held at very cold refrigerator like temperatures for 3-4 days. Because goats and sheeps milk does not separate like cow dairy.

    Cow dairy taking over the world as the primary dairy is sort of modern as well... it goes hand in hand with that refrigeration.
    Back before that more people could afford and could feed a few family goats or sheep.
    Cows take a nice large pasture, sheep a rather smaller lot, goats... they will thrive on rocky ground and prefer scrub.

    Traditional... is a funny thing.

    Sure there is a place for some "low fat" dairy products... just don't forget why they exist.
    They were made when it was convenient for the people making them, seasonally.
    And according to location, type of dairy... so in some regions the people really never ate any low fat dairy at all... because it was very, very hard to separate the cream of the type of dairy they used.
    Butter and the skimming of cream didn't become a regular thing unless it was in a very rich household until the advent of modern times.
    The butter and cream went to the rich guy, or the cow owner in the seasons he was lucky enough to treat himself. The low fat left overs went to the kitchen maids and the dogs or pigs, or into the cow owners wife's cooking pot if she was really frugal... which she likely was.

    Even when large farms came about, and early factory processing came about, before milk trucks were refrigerated there were often entire summer deliveries of milk that were too clabbered by the time they reached the factory to be skimmed. They were used whole for full fat cheeses.
    So still seasonal... until very recently.
    Awesome to have some real perspective.

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