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Thread: Avoiding wheat when no sensitivity?

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  1. #1
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    Avoiding wheat when no sensitivity?

    It seems one of the philosophies behind a grain-free primal diet is the idea that we all have some degree of sensitivity to wheat, even if we have no full blown wheat or gluten allergy. But what if you have been tested for wheat sensitivity and it came out negative? Is there still really a significant advantage to avoiding it altogether? I agree all white flour products should be avoided by everyone just because "bad" carbs cause all sorts of health issues from high triglycerides to diabetes. But if if you have no wheat sensitivity is there really any reason to avoid the healthier forms of wheat, such as a slice of organic whole grain bread?

  2. #2
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    Yep. You avoid consuming empty calories & increasing your appetite. No matter how whole, grains impact appetite more than anything else, causing false hunger. You can try for yourself, avoiding all grain products for 3-6 weeks, and counting calories to reach satiation. It will most likely be much lower (a few hundred calories).

    Plus, have ever seen a loaf of bread that has one ingredient: wheat? Take a look at the list otherwise, and think if you want to consume everything else.
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  3. #3
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    Everything Leida said is spot on.

    If you must have bread, I'd get Ezekiel's organic sprouted multi-grain bread. I've got a loaf that sits in my freezer that my boyfriend eats maybe 2 slices of every week, and it's only 15g carbs a slice. Not horrible, but still not good. Grains are empty calories; it's not that they themselves are necessarily dangerous, it's that you're filling up on grains instead of eating something with more nutritional value.
    Last edited by 2ndChance; 10-01-2012 at 10:52 AM.

  4. #4
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    I have a sandwich everyday at lunch made with wheat bread, been eating lunch like this for the past twenty years, and I never had issues.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barefoot Gentile View Post
    I have a sandwich everyday at lunch made with wheat bread, been eating lunch like this for the past twenty years, and I never had issues.
    I used to think like you until I actually stopped eating that way - I will never go back to eating SAD!
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirlot View Post
    I used to think like you until I actually stopped eating that way - I will never go back to eating SAD!
    What does SAD stand for?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barefoot Gentile View Post
    What does SAD stand for?
    I believe it stands for Standard American Diet.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pyro13g View Post
    This is great-- definitely sharing this with the doubters in my life! Thanks for passing it on!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pyro13g View Post
    I like this part. What they really want to say is 'people will lose their addiction to it, eat less of it, and we won't sell as much.'

    "This thing binds into the opiate receptors in your brain and in most people stimulates appetite, such that we consume 440 more calories per day, 365 days per year. Asked if the farming industry could change back to the grain it formerly produced, Davis said it could, but it would not be economically feasible because it yields less per acre."

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