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Thread: Egg cooking? page 4

  1. #31
    JWBooth's Avatar
    JWBooth is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob loblaw View Post
    I totally agree on avoiding "Omega-3" eggs. Those chickens are fed a diet that is high in Flaxseed, which is certainly not a "normal" diet for a chicken. While it costs a lot, I always go for pasture raised, soy-free eggs. (Though at $7 a dozen, it is pricey!
    But Omega 3 eggs are usually an alternative to regular supermarket eggs, not pastured eggs. I agree pastured is best, but why would flax seed supplement make an egg worse than an industrial chicken fed the same grain based feed but without flax seed?

    As for eggs in the fridge, I think it is important to distinguish between washed and unwashed eggs. In Mexico eggs aren't washed and are sold at room temp. When an egg comes out of a hen, it is coated with a substance called the bloom. The bloom seals the egg shell and keeps bacteria out. An egg with a bloom (an unwashed egg) doesn't have to be refrigerated and will stay fine for up to 90 days or so. In America however, we have to deal with an entity called the Federal Government. The Federal Government, in their infinite wisdom, decided to force egg sellers to wash the protective coating off the eggs before they can be sold. So you can't buy unwashed eggs in the USA, at least not legally. Sometimes egg producers coat the egg with an oil that attempts to replicate the protective coating the government made them wash off but they aren't required to do that. If an egg is washed and has no coating, it really should be refrigerated. So if you are an American, unless you have your own hens or buy from somebody who you know doesn't wash the eggs, you should keep your eggs cold. Ridiculous, but that is our government for you.

  2. #32
    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWBooth View Post
    But Omega 3 eggs are usually an alternative to regular supermarket eggs, not pastured eggs. I agree pastured is best, but why would flax seed supplement make an egg worse than an industrial chicken fed the same grain based feed but without flax seed?
    Agreed. Birds were designed to eat seed, anyway (think: birdseed...) What I don't want my eggs to be full of is soy.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sakura_girl View Post
    Agreed. Birds were designed to eat seed, anyway (think: birdseed...) What I don't want my eggs to be full of is soy.
    good luck finding those, and let me know when you do
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  4. #34
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    The Big Green Egg kamado style grill is wonderful because of its ease of use. It is possible to set your Egg up for direct grilling, just like a normal grill, to barbecue chicken.

  5. #35
    jpatti's Avatar
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    I agree with the distinction between washed and unwashed eggs. When we had our own chickens, I neither washed nor refrigerated; now I buy from a local farmer, legally required to wash them, so I refrigerate. If I "stocked up" on washed eggs, I would probably use waterglass.

    I think raw yolks are healthier than cooked, but doubt mechanically breaking the yolk makes much difference. For example, assuming good, healthy eggs, I expect eggnog whipped up in a blender to be healthier than a hard-boiled egg.

    I like plain eggs over easy, softboiled or hardboiled. I don't like scrambled eggs much, but do like omelets and frittatas.

    Hubby doesn't like runny yolks and it never occurred to me to try to influence this at all. His fruit and veggie intake has increased tremendously since we married, his sugar intake has drastically increased, he eats pastured meat and eggs and drinks raw milk. But... I just don't think this is a difference that makes much of a difference.

    As long as they have dark yellow yolks from the chickens running around on grass in sunshine, they're good.

  6. #36
    jpatti's Avatar
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    The local farm I buy from sells soy-free eggs.

    When we had chickens ourselves, they were soy-free. I never bought chicken feed, just a 50 lb bag of wheat and a 50 lb bag of oats... every 15 months or so (those were the 2 cheapest plain grains). We used grain to "call" them with, it was a minimal part of their diet, I'd throw a handful if I wanted to move them from one spot to another, or round them up at dusk.

    Flock size varied from 10 overwinter (8 hens & 2 roosters) to 40 or so in summer. We did this for years and years. They had DE, oyster shell and cow minerals in the coop permanently. And fresh water in the coop daily.

    All "compost" except coffee grounds went into the coop, as did garden trimmings, so there was "food" while they were locked up. In winter, since the coop was unheated, I gave them a bit of bacon grease just to increase calories some.

    But... they spent most of the day outside, and thus got most of their calories out there. They got let out at noon each day (after laying) and put away at dusk (to protect from predators). So... they ate bugs, grass, weeds, reptiles, mice, whatever. Their choice.

    Since we don't eat soy and there's none growing anywhere within their range, the eggs and meat were soy free.

    The farm I buy from raises larger flocks, and does buy a premade feed (though the chickens are on pasture, not just fed the feed. They use a soy-free feed.

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