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Thread: Studies that undeniably show high cal/high fat diet leads to weight loss?

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  1. #1
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    Studies that undeniably show high cal/high fat diet leads to weight loss?

    especially those who do little in the way of exercise and eat above and beyond their "maintenance" calories limit.

    are their any?

  2. #2
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    huh?

  3. #3
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    I don't think you quite get the idea of how a high fat diet works in terms of health and weight loss if your asking this. Maybe you should ask that instead.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I don't think you quite get the idea of how a high fat diet works in terms of health and weight loss if your asking this. Maybe you should ask that instead.
    No I'm for studies that possibly show that on a high fat diet someone eating well above their maintenance lost weight. Because I'm of the view that calories absolutely must be kept in check.

  5. #5
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    I think it varies for everyone. Initially, I was able to eat all the primal food I wanted and lost weight slowly the first month. I think once my body realized I was planning to continue to eat this way, I stopped losing. Once I started logging, and realized I was at about 2000 calories I started cutting back. Now I'm back to slowly losing at about 1500 calories. I only want to either weigh or look like I weigh 125, so only need to lose 6 more lbs. I am sure a heavier person might be able to do the all he/she wants for longer, but ultimately will need to monitor calories in order to reach the goal... Not exactly scientific, but an ongoing experiment...
    Primal since 4/7/2012

    Starting weight 140
    Current weigh 126

    www.jenniferglobensky.blogspot.com

    Jennifer

  6. #6
    Why do you think anyone eating above maintenance could lose weight?

  7. #7
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    The question is a tautology. The definition of weight loss or weight gain (once water weight has been factored out) is an energy deficit or surplus. The argument that keeps coming back around is whether the type of calories in affects the quantity of calories out. Not whether eating a lot of butter allows one to defy the laws of thermodynamics.

    In other words, the argument you're looking for proof of doesn't exist, and is nothing but a great example of the term "straw man."

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    The question is a tautology....
    In other words, the argument you're looking for proof of doesn't exist, and is nothing but a great example of the term "straw man."
    Indeed.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    The question is a tautology. The definition of weight loss or weight gain (once water weight has been factored out) is an energy deficit or surplus. The argument that keeps coming back around is whether the type of calories in affects the quantity of calories out. Not whether eating a lot of butter allows one to defy the laws of thermodynamics.

    In other words, the argument you're looking for proof of doesn't exist, and is nothing but a great example of the term "straw man."
    My point...expressed in better words . Or at least spelled out in simple terms better for the OP.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichMahogany View Post
    The question is a tautology. The definition of weight loss or weight gain (once water weight has been factored out) is an energy deficit or surplus. The argument that keeps coming back around is whether the type of calories in affects the quantity of calories out. Not whether eating a lot of butter allows one to defy the laws of thermodynamics.
    I think the other key component of it is the satiety/psychological aspect. Even if there's no difference in calories in or out in the short term, some paradigms may be more sustainable than others over the long term, based upon feelings of satiety, and general all-around stress levels.

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