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Thread: Slightly hurt back + another lifting question page 2

  1. #11
    Gadsie's Avatar
    Gadsie is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by EvRevFit View Post
    From personal experience I've found that every single time I had that same type of back issue the cause was always not enough stabilization in the core. I also use the valsalva maneuver to stay that much tighter when I squat and deadlift.
    Is that basically trying to pump all blood to your face in order to get a tight core? Is it a myth my father made up that veins can pop when doing that? Anyway, I never bothered tighting my core extra. So I'll try that tomorrow
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  2. #12
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    Miscellangela is offline Senior Member
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    Tightening your core is extremely important. It's what keeps you stable, and keeps your spine supported.

    The valsalva maneuver is invaluable. Try saying that three times fast. Lotsa v's.

  3. #13
    Gadsie's Avatar
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    Alright so I deloaded squat and deadlift. I hope I won't hurt my back again when I pass this weight again.
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  4. #14
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    SQUATING: Get under the bar first, everything has to be TIGHT, hands, abs, feet, lower back. Get a good grip and rest the bar on your upper back, not your neck. Pull back your traps and your shoulder blades, the tighter your upper back is the more stable the weight will feel. Also get a big gulp of air and try to expand your lower abs outward ( like you are giving yourself an imaginary beer belly) this will push your lower back muscles against your lower back and tighten everything up down low. Now when you take it out you don't want to STEP back, this is the biggest mistake some people make, it can ruin your form. Slide your feet back, about 6-8 inches away from the pins, or where ever you rack it. there is no need to back up a foot like some people do. Stay tight, slide your feet back ( don't step back) and focus on your hips, sit back with the weight.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadsie View Post
    Would you consider this as succeeded or failed bench press workout? (should I increase weight or leave it the same next time?)
    I measure succeed and fail based on effort. Balls to the wall max intensity is always a succeed. But, I understand your question in terms of going up in weight and I say go ahead and up it. You hit your lift on the third set which should indicate that your ready for an increase.

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