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Thread: Deadlift: Is Nearly Passing Out Normal? page 2

  1. #11
    Owly's Avatar
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    Lol. I think I'm too busy concentrating on not falling over to even consider attacking anyone.
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  2. #12
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    tcb
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    Reminds me of the eatbigliftbig shirt... "If deadlifts were supposed to be easy, they'd be called ellipticals"

  3. #13
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    Thanks, I figured it was pretty normal and related to blood pressure after a lot of strain. Glad to see everyone else gets it. I mean, I'm not glad you're lightheaded, but I'm...never mind, I'll shut up now. As long as I don't end up falling face-first into a rack I'm not too worried.

  4. #14
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    Do heavy deadliest cause this effect in a lot of people, yes.

    The point is "what is the point" you lift something heavy then can't properly take control of your body. How is that beneficial, useful, primal or of any benefit except to quote some abstract poundage. To lift something slightly less heavy and to be able to consciously move it control it- jump, run, drop it and start again- that makes sense.

    You should try to master your body and its function not practice to lose mastery of it.

  5. #15
    Alex Good's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandstone View Post
    Do heavy deadliest cause this effect in a lot of people, yes.

    The point is "what is the point" you lift something heavy then can't properly take control of your body. How is that beneficial, useful, primal or of any benefit except to quote some abstract poundage. To lift something slightly less heavy and to be able to consciously move it control it- jump, run, drop it and start again- that makes sense.

    You should try to master your body and its function not practice to lose mastery of it.
    Decreased blood pressure caused by loss of homeostasis. Training yourself will result in a greater buffer zone before you lose homeostasis. It's like practicing martial arts even though everyone around you is small and weak. You probably won't ever need that extra skill but it's nice to have just in case, even though your master probably gave you a few bruises while you were being taught.

    Owly: Loss of oxygen in the brain can result in fight or flight responses. Mostly because your brain thinks you're dying. I've experienced these things numerous times.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

  6. #16
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    My boyfriend blacks out after a set of 365x5.

    Curses, to the people who love squats. I hate them with a passion, but I do them every time I go to the gym, anyway.

  7. #17
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    I do not love squats. They are very taxing mentally and physically. I have to really psych myself up before I get to my top set.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandstone View Post
    Do heavy deadliest cause this effect in a lot of people, yes.

    The point is "what is the point" you lift something heavy then can't properly take control of your body. How is that beneficial, useful, primal or of any benefit except to quote some abstract poundage. To lift something slightly less heavy and to be able to consciously move it control it- jump, run, drop it and start again- that makes sense.

    You should try to master your body and its function not practice to lose mastery of it.
    Nobody is practicing to "lose mastery of their body" - but working your body right at its limit causes weird shit to happen. Phantom pain, dizzyness, puking, that kind of thing. Then you adapt, and your limits are expanded. That's called training. And manipulating things in the environment is just as cool as manipulating your own body, that's an argument that never made any sense.
    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

  9. #19
    Owly's Avatar
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    Exactly. And I've also come close to passing out or puking from bodyweight stuff.

    The point is to push your limits. Once upon a time, for me, that was a 100-pound deadlift. Now it's a 250-pound deadlift. Pushing those limits has made a huge difference in my functional strength. I can lift objects now I could never lift before, and as someone with a large partner, I feel like I might have some chance of saving him if I needed to haul him out of a burning building or something. Lifting heavy stuff did that for me. I can also climb up stuff--doing pullups did that for me (and as a woman, getting that first pullup was definitely pushing my limits).

    And oddly, for once I actually agree with Alex on it being similar to martial arts training. You push yourself to do progressively more difficult things until the formerly hard stuff seems easy. Sometimes it hurts. I remember bruising my forearm from elbow to wrist trying to do an elbow break on a board. But now that I can do that, I know just how powerful a weapon an elbow can be.

    Adaptation comes from stress. If you never push the boundaries, you can't grow.
    “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

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