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Thread: Is there really a nutritional need for fruits and vegetables? page 7

  1. #61
    BennettC's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    mhmm ive always wanted to try brain
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  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirlot View Post
    Really brain, heart, lungs and other organs??? I really did not think that was possible this side of France.
    I think it's illegal under Canadian law to sell any neurological tissues, but that may be different in other parts of North America.

    I'm not up for eating brain anyhow. I enjoy eating vegetables and find I digest them just fine, so I'm happy to consume our weekly CSA haul instead. I have not yet encountered a vegetable I didn't like (although some cooking techniques leave much to be desired).
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Yes. Locally grown and halal butchered. Although I don't think I want the lungs. How the heck does one cook lungs?

    Ooooh, brains are delicious. Try scrambling them with some eggs. It ends up tasting like egg flavored butter.
    In Venezuela, for breakfast, we'd have scrambled brains with eggs. (Yes I know, ...scrambled brains...) These were monkey brains, a little too close for comfort for a 12 year old boy... but I did eat them, as well as the menudo & other spare parts. Menudo stank to high heaven! My favorite food there was the shark empanadas & arepas, lived on those most of my summer in Venezuela. Unless someone is regularly dining on organs of wild or organically raised animals, in my opinion, including "some" veggies in one's diet, is not an unreasonable option. I personally would not be happy cutting out small or big ass salads & fruit, both of which I already eat sparingly at this point in my journey. As many of you already know, I'm seriously into fermenting foods & veggies (I even teach classes on fermentation). They are much more digestible after undergoing fermentation, same with dairy & fruit juices, reducing their carb & sugar load & upping their probiotic, enzymatic & fatty acid profiles. For me personally, I enjoy eating them, I digest & process them well, & in my view of things, they are important parts of my total package. And like Owly said, and I second it, "I never met a vegetable I didn't like."
    Last edited by Betorq; 09-24-2012 at 05:34 AM.
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  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennettC View Post
    glucose and fructose are both deadly.
    oy vey, this is why i give up!

    Quote Originally Posted by BennettC View Post
    meat and fat make me feel good, getting back to basics is what this about for me.
    well, despite the dogma then, i think you have your answer...

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    I'm not arguing against northern indigenous people's diets as unhealthy at all--I think as they are traditionally consumed, the old foods of northern peoples can be amazingly healthful, but that we can't just look at their macros and think that we're replicating that on steaks and butter (which I know you don't do, sbhikes, but it's a common misconception in low carb discussions). And of course I'm aware that there's a huge diversity among northern peoples around the globe. I definitely don't think the Sami are the same as the Inuit in Nunavut, for example.

    In fact, not all Arctic people in Canada are Inuit either, and there's a lot of diversity in both culture and food practices across the north. The Gwich'in for example are dependent primarily on caribou along with some fish and moose for meat. They do, however, eat plants, including methods for preserving things like berries into the winter including using the permafrost as a natural freezer. Their traditional diet would also be considered low carb compared to the average southerner, but they also practice whole animal eating (including brain, stomach, and other bits even many "odd bits" eaters don't consume), as do most indigenous northern peoples. A friend of mine is an ethnobotanist who specifically studies the traditional use of plants in Gwich'in culture, and plant foods are very important both in their daily diet and as traditional medicines.
    The main reason I was offering the Sami as another culture to look at was because I think a lot of us around here are probably of European descent and there can be a tendency to think that Inuit are so far north, their way of life is so different, they are probably genetically way different from us, they don't even look like many of us. There's a tendency for some to say, look at the Inuit who have NO plants to eat and they are healthy (I don't think they have NO plants, but lots of people think they don't). And then the counter to that is, yeah, well, the Inuit are totally different from you and me, they live in such a harsh climate, what they eat helps them survive and might not be optimal, what they eat is so far different than anything you'll ever find in a grocery store, their genetics are different, yadda yadda.

    So I offer up a culture that lives in Europe at the same latitudes as other Northern Europeans, a culture I think most people have never even heard of. They are blond and blue-eyed and look a lot like me when I look in the mirror, they're not hunter gatherers, not living in the ice age, they aren't a Clan of the Cave Bear fantasy. Look at what they eat. Minimal plants, but some. Food similar to tribes in the far north of North America, but no whale blubber and raw bearded seal. Foods you can almost find in a grocery store. I can't find reindeer, but I can find other ruminants. The rest I pretty much can find. They are healthy. They're another culture with a tradition that is fairly still intact that you can look at for an idea of what people eat naturally.
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  6. #66
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    I'm of Irish and Scottish decent so I'd like to think I'm more suited for a herdsman type diet. meat and milk, which ive had great success on. After reading on zeroinginonhealth, they don't see lactose carbs as a problem although some people have a problem with it. I am just going to stay with meat, milk, and eggs and keep my carbs at 60grams with the milk. Instead of this dark chocolate and peanut butter snack ive been having everyday I'll just have a meat and cheese snack
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  7. #67
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    Well, the Sami aren't technically Europeans as we usually think of that ethnicity. Though, while they originated in Eastern Europe and Asia, so did the Celts, but it seems the Sami migrated to northern Europe first (I think).

    This has interesting info about Sami diet: Lifestyle, Genetics, and Disease in Sami . It seems the researchers are a bit confused about the paradox between their diet and their health, lol.

    While the Sami are still the only active hunter-gatherer group in Scandinavia, "regular" Scandinavians still eat lots of fish and reindeer meat. I once knew a 3-yo Swedish-American girl whose favorite breakfast (and snack, and lunch, and dinner) was "yellow fish" (aka pickled mustard herring), straight from the jar. Cheese fermented until it is completely black is also still common, and that is also served for breakfast.

    Even leaving aside the Scandinavians, the pre-potato and pre-widespread-wheat diet of the British Isles was heavy on seafood, seaweed, pig's head (just pickle it and then pour Guinness over it is how it is still eaten today in some parts of Ireland), and various blood puddings and blood sausage. And of course beef and dairy. Vegetables were considered condiments (Food In Ancient Ireland). Important to note that the Irish used to be considered fierce warriors, it was only after the potato took over that overall health declined.

    So yeah, no need to try to emulate exotic tribes living in a radially different environment. I made fish "fajitas" last night with lots of tilapia and lots of bell peppers with some raw cheddar and avocado over it - that ain't Irish or Eskimo (or anyone else) food. But I thought it was yummy and I'm pretty sure that it was plenty nutritious, more because of the tilapia and cheese than the peppers, but the peppers made it look and taste better.

  8. #68
    Miscellangela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarahW View Post
    To side-step previous posts:

    he downs red meat and bacon with relish.
    Who puts relish on bacon?

    Lol, just kidding. Couldn't resist. Sorry.

    Please continue.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarahW View Post
    Well, the Sami aren't technically Europeans as we usually think of that ethnicity. Though, while they originated in Eastern Europe and Asia, so did the Celts, but it seems the Sami migrated to northern Europe first (I think).

    This has interesting info about Sami diet: Lifestyle, Genetics, and Disease in Sami . It seems the researchers are a bit confused about the paradox between their diet and their health, lol.

    While the Sami are still the only active hunter-gatherer group in Scandinavia, "regular" Scandinavians still eat lots of fish and reindeer meat. I once knew a 3-yo Swedish-American girl whose favorite breakfast (and snack, and lunch, and dinner) was "yellow fish" (aka pickled mustard herring), straight from the jar. Cheese fermented until it is completely black is also still common, and that is also served for breakfast.

    Even leaving aside the Scandinavians, the pre-potato and pre-widespread-wheat diet of the British Isles was heavy on seafood, seaweed, pig's head (just pickle it and then pour Guinness over it is how it is still eaten today in some parts of Ireland), and various blood puddings and blood sausage. And of course beef and dairy. Vegetables were considered condiments (Food In Ancient Ireland). Important to note that the Irish used to be considered fierce warriors, it was only after the potato took over that overall health declined.

    So yeah, no need to try to emulate exotic tribes living in a radially different environment. I made fish "fajitas" last night with lots of tilapia and lots of bell peppers with some raw cheddar and avocado over it - that ain't Irish or Eskimo (or anyone else) food. But I thought it was yummy and I'm pretty sure that it was plenty nutritious, more because of the tilapia and cheese than the peppers, but the peppers made it look and taste better.
    Interesting. They are so surprised when their high fat, high meat diet doesn't result in disease. I'm not surprised.
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  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by BennettC View Post
    glucose and fructose are both deadly.
    Weak argument. Everything is potentially deadly, even water.
    Everything is bad for something - How do you feel today?

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