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Thread: 180,000-Year-Old Mutation Allowed Humans to Become Vegetarians page

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    Grok's Avatar
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    180,000-Year-Old Mutation Allowed Humans to Become Vegetarians

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    Early humans were able to move from Africa after a single genetic mutation allowed them to become vegetarians, scientists claim.
    Medical Daily


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    Alex Good's Avatar
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    Retards. Not only are they ignoring the fact that animals raised on a natural diet have more O-3s, they're also ignoring the fact that humans started off being able to process plants.
    More lame vegetarian propaganda.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    WTF, so fish are essential -duh - the developed some gene to eat plants which seems to cause a shit load of problems
    "In 2011, researchers found that people of African descent have a significantly higher frequency of the gene that converts plant-based fatty acids to polyunsaturated fat. This gene causes inflammation, which may be why African Americans have higher rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, stroke, coronary heart disease and certain types of cancer."
    and that means they are vegetarian? I think not...seems more likely they adapted to other good protein sources like hunting otherwise by their own findings they were up the creek.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grok View Post
    It is at least interesting that there are researchers who are recognizing that, as Medical Daily puts it:

    Homo sapiens first appeared 180,000 years ago but stayed around bodies of water in central Africa for almost 100,000 years. Researchers explained that the location was critical because it had a ready supply of fish and shellfish that provided the necessary fatty acid Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) necessary for brain development.
    This is the research coming from people like Crawford and Cunnane that Jack Kruse has been pushing.

    Paleoanthropologists seem to have been working with a notion going all the way back to the 1920s that food was coming from the savannah. You'll often hear it said in paleo circles that meat is what fuelled human brain expansion. But the point ot be grasped is that this is not simply an energetic question. Encephalization would have required a good supply of some specific nutrients including DHA. The best source of these is seafood:

    This is the paper to read:

    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14527626

    Looking at the geography, plenty of riverine and shoreline resources available in the Rift Valley.

    There is some very interesting stuff to be said about this. And kudos to Jack for drawing attention to some areas like this that have been overlooked in the paleosphere. Jack certainly deserves an apology -- not that he's likely to get one. He gets a few cracks back here, and can you blame him?

    BRAIN GUT 12: DARE TO DISAGREE? | Jack Kruse


    Anyway, so it seems that some researchers think they found something interesting to say about differing abilities among human populations to actually make DHA. That's interesting. One would have to read the linked PLoS article to get much detail on that.

    AFAIK, insofar as we are able to make DHA from other omega-3 fatty acids we don't do it very well. This is why they sell "omega-3 eggs". Leave it to the chickens to make the DHA from the flaxseeds because you're not going to do it very well, if at all.

    I haven't read the PLoS article yet. It doesn't look to me as if the researchers have a hidden vegetarian agenda. According to Medical Daily, they specifically say:

    In 2011, researchers found that people of African descent have a significantly higher frequency of the gene that converts plant-based fatty acids to polyunsaturated fat. This gene causes inflammation, which may be why African Americans have higher rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, stroke, coronary heart disease and certain types of cancer.
    IOW, this gene may allow you not to be "tethered" to water resources, but there's no indication that you still wouldn't do better eating the shellfish and fish. And it seems to come at a hell of a price: "This gene causes inflammation," they say.

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    Dude, I just read most of that (skimming most and reading the non-geek parts carefully), and, ugh, I feel convicted. Well, I might be okay, but my husband is a huge sinner. We eat absolutely NO shellfish. My exposure to fish growing up was salmon patties from a can, and my husband's was frozen fish sticks. That's it. I have brought us around to eating fish fillets for dinner 1 or 2 times a week, and I bought some kelp powder and some seaweed, but I haven't started doing much with those yet.

    My husband says he is allergic to shellfish, but I think it is more that he has such a strong aversion to it that he makes himself sick. After reading Kruse, I think it is possible that my husband suffers from low iodine. He has constant problems with fatigue, aches, and trouble sleeping. He had food poisoning a few months ago and even after he got over it he had constant dizziness and a friend of ours believed it was a magnesium deficiency and bought him some MagOx. After DH takes a MagOx pill he feels better and feels drowsy. We've been trying to figure out why this is, and maybe the problem is the lack of iodine. We used to use regular table salt, but only scantily, and DH has blood-pressure issues, so he stayed away from it as much as he could - but as I understand it the iodine added to salt is synthetic. We have switched to Himalayan salt and obviously more eggs since becoming Primal, and people have said that DH is looking a lot healthier and much more alert, but he is still having the sleeping problems. Maybe all his years of not eating any fish means that he has to really make up for it now?

    Also, since we don't eat shellfish, our 5-yo doesn't either. I don't want him to grow up hating the taste of it like we do, but it is really hard to feed a kid something that you won't eat (kids use basic evolutionary logic here). I think I saw a recipe somewhere for putting small shrimp in scrambled eggs - maybe I should look into that for his breakfast. Oy, I'm feeling convicted. But Kruse suggests non-crustaceans the most, and clams and scallops are really foreign culinary territory for me.

    In 2011, researchers found that people of African descent have a significantly higher frequency of the gene that converts plant-based fatty acids to polyunsaturated fat. This gene causes inflammation, which may be why African Americans have higher rates of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, stroke, coronary heart disease and certain types of cancer.
    So...is this another nail in the coffin of flax and chia?

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    So confusing. Vegetarians/vegans argue our true nature is that we were designed to eat plants only (stay in the trees! Mother Natures first mistake allowing ape men to walk the earth), roughly 6 million years ago. Then mother nature (who is stupid) made a another mistake and we started to incorporate meat into our diet while walking around. Mother nature erred again millions of years ago and allowed us to learn how to cook. Many vegetarians and most vegans tell us cooking destroys food nutrition...how could mother nature be SO stupid? This article suggests we were mostly pescavores tethered to large bodies of water for our survival before the gene mutation. With the gene mutation we evolved to eat more plants. Ummm does that makes us omnivores? (we were always omnivores) Pass the ribs please.

    Last edited by Moochy; 09-22-2012 at 11:11 AM.
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    good article. but shows how terrible of an impact vegetation was on the diet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lewis View Post

    Looking at the geography, plenty of riverine and shoreline resources available in the Rift Valley.

    There is some very interesting stuff to be said about this. And kudos to Jack for drawing attention to some areas like this that have been overlooked in the paleosphere. Jack certainly deserves an apology -- not that he's likely to get one. He gets a few cracks back here, and can you blame him?

    BRAIN GUT 12: DARE TO DISAGREE? | Jack Kruse


    Thank you so much for sharing this, completely blew my mind and shattered my previous logic. In his article he highlighted shellfish a lot. Not sure if I missed this, but what about other seafood, wouldn't that suffice for iodine levels? Or even seaweed?

    Additionally, I took a look at this article here for iodine levels of common foods: Foods High in Iodine

    Im trying to put on muscle mass right now, so I went with Mark's reccomendation with adding 12 eggs a day on top of a normal meat intake. Given that 12 eggs, plus my multivitamin will fullfill my assumed iodine requirement (150 mcg per day), does that mean Im okay? Or am I missing something here.. Hm.

    Still gonna add more shellfish and seaweed to my diet regardless, great article!

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