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Thread: Mineral Problems? Help! page 2

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyro_349 View Post
    I tried upping the water for a while, it actually made me more dehydrated (though I was in ketosis at the time), due to the low carb, I was l losing most of my minerals along with my water (it was going straight through me) - now I'm drinking either when I'm thirsty, or just every now and then.
    Make sure that the water you are drinking is mineralized, such as spring water that has not been distilled or subjected to reverse osmosis (R/O). Purified waters such as distilled and R/O can increase dehydration. Although drinking water leading to dehydration may sound contradictory there is a simple basis for it. Purified waters are more rapidly absorbed, but this creates a stress on the cells. So the body works overtime trying to rid itself of this sudden influx of water leading to a rebound dehydration.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyro_349 View Post
    I'm not actually supplementing my calcium, mainly due to this: Calcium supplements with or without vitamin D and risk of cardiovascular events: reanalysis of the Women and Vascular events in healthy older women receiving calcium... [BMJ. 2008] - PubMed - NCBI (Though, at the time I didn't realize the study was done solely on women). My 800mg intake of calcium is from dietary sources - should I still consider supplementing my calcium?
    There is a lot more to that story. They were merely looking at the effects of calcium and vitamin D, which increases calcium absorption. And yes, high serum calcium not balanced by magnesium can increase the risk of cardiovascular events. This is not a recent discovery, but rather has been known for a very long time. This all goes back to what I was saying earlier about calcium being a muscle contractor and magnesium a muscle relaxant. Blood vessels are also muscles and are contracted by calcium reducing blood flow. Again this is why calcium channel blockers are so commonly used to treat high blood pressure. Magnesium on the other hand is the counter to calcium and relaxes the blood vessels reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. When they did the study they created an imbalance between the calcium and magnesium, which increases the risk of cardiovascular events by the constriction of blood vessels leading to a decrease of blood flow to the heart and brain. In my opinion it s best to keep magnesium intake about the same or in some cases higher than calcium for safety.

    Do you need to supplement? You can again if you keep the calcium balanced with magnesium in particular. But we also have to keep in mind that there is so much more to healthy bones than simply calcium and magnesium. Silica for example is the most important nutrient needed for bone health. And without it bone cannot even mineralize. And there are numerous other nutrients needed to create bone and keep it healthy. There is so much hype behind calcium being needed for strong bones, but that is like saying that we only need oxygen to live.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwilauren View Post
    I'd say you are both magnesium deficient and iodine deficient (we need regular food sources of iodine in our diet - you have none). I'd up the Mg as others have said and go for Mag Malate or, even better, Mag Threonate from LEF. Take it until bowel tolerance. That can be 2000mg every night or more.
    Two things I disagree with. First of all magnesium malate is a better choice since both the magnesium and the malic acid it is bound to elevate ATP, which is essential to proper cell function.

    More importantly though I strongly disagree with the amount you are recommending. I generally do not recommend more than 400mg 2 to 3 times a day. One of the main reasons for this is because the magnesium works as a natural calcium channel blocker lowering blood pressure. If someone has calcium induced hypertension then the amount of magnesium I recommend is generally sufficient to bring the blood pressure back down to normal. On the other hand if someone has below normal blood pressure then dropping it even lower with excessive doses of magnesium puts the person at a higher risk for heart attack or stroke from excessive hypotension.

    Another problem is taking such high doses can also lead to increased transit time reducing nutrient absorption and possible electrolyte imbalances.

  3. #13
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    I take 800mg of magnesium every day. Any less than that and my migraines return, along with twitching/cramping legs at night. Strangely enough, I found the "better" forms just didn't work as well for me. The crappy magnesium oxide form works best for me (though I've never been accused of being "normal"). To avoid any potential "poop issues", I take half in the morning and half before bed.

    Oh, I forgot. I do take a multi, so I guess all together I take 840mg. Seriously, if you're only going to put 40mg in, don't bother.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    Make sure that the water you are drinking is mineralized
    I add a pinch of Himalayan pink salt to each 600 ml bottle (and will also start adding some raw lemon juice now as well). I did manage to find Magnesium citrate in 150mg capsules (couldn't find Mg Malate from my normal sources), so I'll swap my mag supplement to that and try messing around with the dosage (though I'll change it slowly rather then jumping to 2000 mg) - and I'll probably split it so half in the morning and half before bed (which is probably good anyway in case I have any dehydration issues over night).

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwilauren
    I'd say you are both magnesium deficient and iodine deficient (we need regular food sources of iodine in our diet - you have none).
    That's a good point about the iodine, I didn't actually notice that - will look in to and see how I go.

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwilauren
    If your Vitamin D isn't at the top of the range, up your supplementation, esp now that cooler weather and shorter days are coming.
    Not really an issue, I live in opposite land (Australia) so we are actually heading towards summer at the moment - which is why I'm only supplementing 3,000 UI throughout the day (as I said, it's more to top-up my levels than anything).

    Thanks for all of your help guys, I'm open to any more suggestions and will let you know how this stuff goes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabine View Post
    Cheap, easy to try.

    You might consider lemon juice in your water, in addition to the salt, also.
    I just realized - wouldn't adding lemon juice to my water erode my teeth in the long run? (assuming I was adding lemon juice to the majority of the water I'm drinking). Would love an answer on this one

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    I would be careful with the iodine supplementation. Of course, everyone's body differs, but when I went a little snack happy with dried lavers and seaweeds, I felt so fatigued I was barely able to get out of bed. From several trials and processes of elimination, I figured it was the excessive seaweed: iodine is great, just don't overdo it or you migh screw up your thyroid.

    I second the magnesium supplementation. I take mag citrate, 800mg a day. I don't take it for cramping, but I understand that most people do take it for that purpose and citrate seems to be more easily absorbed by the body than oxide and malate, from my admittedly limited knowledge of biochemistry.
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    Yea, I wasn't planning on going crazy with the iodine, I'll be adding it slowly to find an adequate level.

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    I started doing the salt and lemon juice in my water after reading primalgirlDotcom's post (2/28/11) about it. She was suffering a variety of symptoms(one of which were cramps) and after ending up in the hospital, was told her electrolytes were slightly low. They recommended Gatorade. She did some research, and made her own primal version.

    Her explanation goes into it more, but basically, the combination of sea salt and lemon juice provides the four basic electrolytes your body needs: potassium, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate(manufactured by your body from potassium). Obviously, there are other things your body needs for good balance, but this is an easy, first step to try before you go crazy with trickier things.

    She doesn't feel the amount of lemon juice in water is anything to worry about, but I don't know how much is considered detrimental to your teeth.

    The recipe I use is: 8C water, juice of one lemon, 1tsp salt-I use a mix of regular/sea salt/Himalayan, half a packet of stevia sweetener. I have gradually reduced the amount of sweetener as my tastes have changed. (I did NOT have good results with honey- I would avoid that!) I alternate a glass of it, with a glass of regular water, throughout the day. I find drinking it makes it easier to drink more water, and for myself, I can feel a difference in how my body feels when I have drunk plenty(for me 12+ glasses per day). Never noticed it 'rushing through' (personal experience).

    .
    Last edited by Sabine; 09-20-2012 at 09:26 AM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damiana View Post
    I would be careful with the iodine supplementation. Of course, everyone's body differs, but when I went a little snack happy with dried lavers and seaweeds, I felt so fatigued I was barely able to get out of bed. From several trials and processes of elimination, I figured it was the excessive seaweed: iodine is great, just don't overdo it or you migh screw up your thyroid.
    Yes, taking to much iodine will shut down the thyroid. This is why high dose iodine is sometimes used to treat hyperthyroidism (excessive thyroid function).

    And high iodine has actually been found to aggravate a common form of hypothyroidism (low thyroid function) known as Hashimoto's thyroidosis.

    Quote Originally Posted by Damiana View Post
    I second the magnesium supplementation. I take mag citrate, 800mg a day. I don't take it for cramping, but I understand that most people do take it for that purpose and citrate seems to be more easily absorbed by the body than oxide and malate, from my admittedly limited knowledge of biochemistry.
    There is no difference in absorption between the citrate and malate, but the malate is more effective and provides more benefits. Citrate is my second choice though.

    Both the citrate and the malate though are significantly safer and better absorbed than magnesium oxide though. The oxide in water forms caustic magnesium hydroxide that neutralizes stomach acid and burns the tissues. Taking it with an acid source though such as lemon juice, vinegar, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), etc. will enhance its absorption and reduce its caustic nature.
    Last edited by JamesS; 09-20-2012 at 09:16 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    Yes, taking to much iodine will shut down the thyroid. This is why high dose iodine is sometimes used to treat hyperthyroidism (excessive thyroid function).

    And high iodine has actually been found to aggravate a common form of hypothyroidism (low thyroid function) known as Hashimoto's thyroidosis.
    By supplementing Iodine, I was referring to a Potassium Iodide spray which has about 280 mcg of Iodine in each spray (only planning on one spray in the morning). I'll try and make a note of my sleep quality and any muscle cramps/pain over the next few days to see if the additional magnesium and iodine help at all (I know a few days isn't really enough to see comprehensive effects, but a noticeable change will hopefully happen quickly - if anyone has a good estimate as to when I should notice effects, I'd love to know).

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