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Thread: Primal children- how to transition them when they are resistant? page 2

  1. #11
    Leida's Avatar
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    I got my wake up call when my daughter 4 yo consumed 4 bananas in a space of an hour and refused all other food. From there on, there was no bread or cheerios in the house, and we endured a battle of wills. I cook and pack every piece of food she takes to day care & school, allow two small candies or something like that a day, and she has organic rice-only cereal as a concession.

    The downside is that she is a meatzza fiend now, and squasheroni and cheese is her dream supper... but she is willingly trying other fare, and likes some, rejects others. I try to explain concepts in simple terms, like 'you can't have just fruit honey, because your energy will run out too fast. You need to have it with PB or yogurt'. I have no quarrel with PB, Greek yogurt and natural hot dogs. May not be the bestest choices, but beat bread and pasta any day. We also looked through DK Eyewitness books about how ancient men ate. Used the Ice Age as an introduction to Vegetarian vs Meat-eater (Dinasaur) and I have the Apple Food Choices sheet on the fridge. And, yes, I had to use the:" Because it is our house. Because that's how we eat" clauses too.

    Right or wrong, but 2 years down the road my kid seems healthy and muscular, has a great sunny disposition, and never refuses to pitch into any activity. I hope she stays that way.
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  2. #12
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    I can't quite say I've been completely successful yet with my 5yo, and I think younger kids might be easier than older kids, who have more opinions and ideas about their life.

    My 5yo understands nothing more than that we are "eating healthy" because Pappa never ate healthy, and that why he has a big belly, and the big belly is going to make Pappa really sick. From when he was young I always just fed him what we ate, and while we were pretty CW, I did read about WAP when he was young, so we were a bit healthier than regular SAD, so I think that made the transition about easier.

    My strategy is to increase the primal foods which he already likes, slowly cutting back on the non-primal foods, and slowly adding in new nutrient-dense foods. He always liked broccoli, orange vegetables, meat, cheese sticks, and salami. So I increased those foods - he takes cooked broccoli to school for lunch, he has orange vegetables for dinner, cheese sticks and Applegate farms salami as snacks. He still eats sprouted bread, Ezekiels 7-grain one, a lot of their other types has soy in it, and while sprouted soy down at the bottom of the ingredient list, he is a 5yo boy, so I avoid those. He used to love Nutella, but then we switched to peanut butter, then Smucker's Naturals, then Smucker's Organic, then Almond butter - he hasn't complained about the change. When I make popcorn now it's only about once a week, and I cook it on the stove with coconut oil and then drizzle a bunch of butter over it (I'm also ordering heirloom popcorn kernels through our co-op). We usually cook him bacon and eggs in the morning and have breakfast together. He wasn't a huge fan of eggs at first, and after his first bite of bacon he declared he didn't like it. But we just kept on serving it to him, and when he sat down to dinner last night (beef roast and carrots) he exclaimed "hey, where's my bacon!?" I put some small pieces of avocado on his taco salad the other night and he ate it without comment. So, progress, slowly.

    In my experience kids are big fans of tender meats. Their baby molars have a hard time with anything tough or chewy, which is why they like hot dogs and chicken nuggets so much, the meat has already been broken up. I think cave people pre-chewed their kid's meat, but I'd rather use a food processor. I watch my kid eat dinner, and even when we were doing a standard 3-section plate he would always eat the meat first, the veggies second, and leave the potatoes/pasta. I always just shrugged when he did this, and now he is a happy little clam not having that stuff on his dinner plate. Baked sweet potatoes and sweet potatoes fries are his favorite "orange" options, so for kids who like carbs maybe you can add in a variety of different carbs and see if something takes. Who knows, some kids might fall in love with turnips, rutabaga, beets, or brussel sprouts. If they don't know they aren't "supposed" to like it, they might make it their new favorite food. If the plate is full of foods they like they won't really think of different options.

    That being said, my kid isn't an angel. I took him with me to the grocery store the other day and he kept on running down the center aisles asking for chips, cookies, and donuts. I said no, no, no like a metronome. He also talks about McDonald's and Burger King a lot, especially the french fries. So if he is left to his own devices he'll stuff his face with junk. But at 5 years old he isn't expected to make wise decisions for himself. I'm leaving him at home when I go grocery shopping, and when I get home and he asks "Mommy, did you forget to buy Cheerios again?" I just say yes.

    I also don't stress about him eating "birthday treats" at school. When I meet with his teacher I'll explain that we are keeping him very low sugar/grain for health reasons (we unexpectedly found that cutting out sugars and grains cured him of his nearly-chronic nosebleeds - seriously, he even got blood tests for leukemia and I got a reference for a doctor to cauterize the vein, but since cutting out sugar and all grains excepted sprouted there hasn't been a drip of blood). I'm not really feeling the need to send along an "alternative" for him to eat, but I just want to make sure he is eating only a small amount.

    With the food commercials on kids TV these days it can be tough to make good choices for kids without them feeling "deprived." But honestly, even though 5yo asks for Trix yogurt because he likes the commercial for it, he doesn't actually like it very much. So for an older kid a conversation about advertising and making good choices for oneself might be a good idea.

    These are just my ideas, but every kid is different, so you'll have to find out what works best for your family.

  3. #13
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    I go by the philosophy that they can't eat it if it's not in the house, so I almost never buy non-primal food. The almost comes in as we have parties for teenagers often in the summer (pool at our house) so we will occasionally buy buns, hot dogs or chips. My son loves hot dogs in a bun (4 yo) better than chips or candy. This stuff is not often here and pizza in a birthday food (if the birthday person chooses it (so a couple of times a year). Other than that, it's not here. What he eats at play dates and snack at school are what they are. Luckily, we have no alergies (that we know of), so I don't worry about the occasional treat. I pack the types of primal food he likes (meat roll ups, apple w/ almond butter, yogurt, cheese, water, banana) and work on getting him to eat veges at home. Just do your best - there are lots of resources out there to help. Kids can be tough. Remember, even half assed primal with almost no processed food is way better than CW and SAD!!!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarahW View Post
    In my experience kids are big fans of tender meats. Their baby molars have a hard time with anything tough or chewy, which is why they like hot dogs and chicken nuggets so much, the meat has already been broken up. I think cave people pre-chewed their kid's meat, but I'd rather use a food processor.
    This is absolutely true for us. We found that the best and tenderest meat was by using the slow cooker (on things like stewing steak). Just divine.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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  5. #15
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    Try this easy alternative to bread (thanks to forum member Rivvin):

    c almond meal
    2 T coconut oil or butter (I use 1 T; coconut oil works best)
    1 t baking powder
    1 egg

    Mix all together. I pour this evenly into four custard-type Pyrex glass bowls (the 10-oz size). It's a very thin layer. Microwave for 60-90 seconds.

    It comes out similar in size, thickness, and consistency to those "100 calorie thin buns". Some people say it tastes eggy to them, but it didn't to me. I refrigerate the extra and it keeps well for a day or two.

  6. #16
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    My 7 year old is a carb fiend. He would live on bread if he could. His favorite snack is bread. Since going primal myself, I haven't gotten or made breads, and except for stuff in the freezer (some bagels and English muffins) on occasion, he hasn't had any bread.

    We have had coconut flour dumplings with chicken, and pancakes made with coconut flour. I got a package of tapioca flour from the store the other day that has recipes for quick breads, pancakes, waffles and more on it.

    Here is what I would do if she were my child. I would explain that not only is the stuff not good for her, but it is also bad for her brother, and that if it is the house, you would eat it, so you are just not going to have wheat bread in the house any longer because you love both of your kids too much. I do think there are gluten free breads out there - make/get those for her sandwiches for lunch. But I would limit those to school days. And then pack in good stuff like hard boiled eggs, fruit, nuts, cheeses if she can have them. Add in a spoonful of high quality chocolate chips for a "treat." Hopefully this will help prevent trading of foods. Also, talk to the teacher, and explain that it is more than just wanting to eat well, it DOES effect her skin and behavior, and you want your daughter on best behavior so that the class is not disrupted by her. (That may be a stretch, but I have seen too many teachers who ignore "health" issues. But they tend to not ignore behavior issues.)

    Dinners and snacks at my house are what I make. I still make most of the things I used to make, only I take out the pasta and rice, and add more vegetables. We have always eaten a lot of curries, stir fries and such. I make cauliflower casserole with cheese sauce, and sometimes include other vegetables too.

    Breakfast I make sausages or bacon, and eggs are optional, but required if they are still hungry. I just found bugs in the cupboard with remaining cereals, so most of that is now gone, and will not be replaced.

    About taking eggs to school, read "Ramona Quimby, Age 8." Ramona takes a hard boiled egg for her lunch every day. I do suggest using a pencil or some food coloring to mark the eggs so that you don't have a Ramona "bad" moment!

  7. #17
    Leida's Avatar
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    With the food commercials on kids TV these days it can be tough to make good choices for kids without them feeling "deprived." But honestly, even though 5yo asks for Trix yogurt because he likes the commercial for it, he doesn't actually like it very much. So for an older kid a conversation about advertising and making good choices for oneself might be a good idea.
    We don't have TV subscription, just rent DVDs from the library & use netflix for specific cartoons. I guess, I have one more benefit of it identified! Good stuff.
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  8. #18
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    My mother was strict. I learned to save my milk money to buy ice cream. I learned to steal. Yes I stole penny candies from 7-11 and the grocery store bulk bin. Eventually I stole funsize candy right out of the bag. I made friends with other kids who had junk food at their house. Good luck to you.
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    My mother was strict. I learned to save my milk money to buy ice cream. I learned to steal. Yes I stole penny candies from 7-11 and the grocery store bulk bin. Eventually I stole funsize candy right out of the bag. I made friends with other kids who had junk food at their house. Good luck to you.
    This is exactly why I make sure I almost always have some primal goodies at my house. Elanaspantry.com has lots of recipes that aren't great but they are waaaaay better than conventional crap. My kids and their friends all love the chocolate chip cookies made with almond flour - I use honey and cut the amount in half and add some stevia instead to lessen the sugar load. I also make the cherry lara bars with dried cherries, coconut flakes and almonds ground together in the food processor until sticky and smooth. It can be made into balls or pressed into a pan with a little dark chocolate on top - also a fav.

  10. #20
    SarahW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    My mother was strict. I learned to save my milk money to buy ice cream. I learned to steal. Yes I stole penny candies from 7-11 and the grocery store bulk bin. Eventually I stole funsize candy right out of the bag. I made friends with other kids who had junk food at their house. Good luck to you.
    Did your mother allow a lot of fruit or other carbs in your diet?

    I'm just wondering because while a lot of us seem to be describing kids as "carb addicts," I think kids need a good dose of carbs and sugar. They are constantly growing and need ready-to-use energy every few hours since their stomachs are small compared to the amount of calories they need to eat in a day. Sugar is a really calorie-dense source of ready energy, so I think that's why kids gravitate to sugary foods.

    I have a theory that kids are naturally fat-adapted, so eating a large amount of carbs won't mess them up, until they stop growing so much, of course. So yeah, if you tell a kid not to eat banana's so much because of the carbs and sugars they'll probably start scheming ways to get them in secret.

    But four bananas in an hour like Leida said is quite a bit... When my aunt visited and bought Cheerios ("they're not Honey Nut, so they don't have any sugar!") my kid ate half the box in about three hours, and complained about being hungry when I took them away (and got a massive nosebleed that lasted over an hour the next day). So I think being careful about the amount is important, and the source. And making sure they get plenty of protein and fat in a day to balance it all out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mud Finger
    This is exactly why I make sure I almost always have some primal goodies at my house. Elanaspantry.com has lots of recipes that aren't great but they are waaaaay better than conventional crap. My kids and their friends all love the chocolate chip cookies made with almond flour - I use honey and cut the amount in half and add some stevia instead to lessen the sugar load. I also make the cherry lara bars with dried cherries, coconut flakes and almonds ground together in the food processor until sticky and smooth. It can be made into balls or pressed into a pan with a little dark chocolate on top - also a fav.
    Thanks for the link! 5yo loves chocolate chip cookies, and I was wondering how to meet that craving. He has always been a dark chocolate fan (like 85% dark), but likes cookies too. So I'll have to search out some super dark morsels, and make him a very happy little boy.

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