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Thread: Digestion of enzymes and cooking page 2

  1. #11
    lcme's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    Patty, you certainly have the inquisitive mind of a scientist though.

    P.S. Prior to your new profile picture I definitely thought that you were a Patricia, now I'm leaning towards a Patrick. That is, assuming that your username has anything to do with your actual name. Haha.

  2. #12
    Allbeef Patty's Avatar
    Allbeef Patty is offline Senior Member
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    I was just talking about this over at the barefoot group board. I'm from NY where there's enough Irish that Patty is almost certainly male.

    It is Patrick, but only my wife and mother call me that. And mom only does it when I've been bad. You can call me Pat, Beef, ABP, or just about anything else. Different groups of friends know me by different names.

  3. #13
    Molecular Grokologist's Avatar
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    I agree that exogenous enzymes have basically no effect on digestion unless you're allowing the food to rot (one method of pre-digestion) before eating it. The one exception would be papain and bromelain from papaya and pineapple respectively. You can use the pulp or juice from those fruits in a marinade to tenderize meat. Enzymatic tenderizers tend to be isolated enzymes from papaya.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allbeef Patty View Post
    I don't know nuffin' 'bout no science, but if you put pineapple to close to meat on a kabob and wait too long to cook and/or eat it it gets that mushy digested kinda consistency that you'd get with an enzymatic tenderizer.
    Accounted for by acid?

  5. #15
    Molecular Grokologist's Avatar
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    Actually, acid doesn't really tenderize anything but the outermost layer of meat. What it does do is help more fluid to get into the meat so it's juicier.
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  6. #16
    Allbeef Patty's Avatar
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    I wrote the thought that acid may be a contributing factor off because similar things don't happen with citrus fruits.

  7. #17
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    I used to be a big believer in raw foods but when you think about it, enzymes = proteins and the stomach is where we start to denature proteins. So, I don't know.

    What of the people who claim they feel better taking enzymes with their meals? Placebo effect?

    And that must mean that eating raw vs. eating cooked holds no difference in terms of enzymes your body requires to digest the food, because even amongst some paleo/primal advocates, they still urge to eat as much raw as possible because of the enzymes in raw foods.

    Huh.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FabMandy View Post
    And that must mean that eating raw vs. eating cooked holds no difference in terms of enzymes your body requires to digest the food, because even amongst some paleo/primal advocates, they still urge to eat as much raw as possible because of the enzymes in raw foods.
    I believe cooking is optional for meat, but that for plant matter, some form of preparation if not actual cooking (fermenting, pickling, etc) is always necessary to render it less toxic.

  9. #19
    Molecular Grokologist's Avatar
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    @FabMandy

    Yes, I'd probably pin it mostly on the placebo effect. The enzymes are going to do a (really) small amount of digestion before they denature, but it's not going to be significant.

    Paleo/primal advocates who advocate raw food because of enzymes are misinformed just like raw vegans. Of course, most food has completely different tastes raw and cooked (I prefer my beef damn near raw) and probiotic food shouldn't be cooked if you want the little guys to make it inside you, but the enzymes are irrelevant.
    Give me liberty. Exploration of other options will be vigorously discouraged.

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