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Thread: Where My Jews At? page

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    MissJecka's Avatar
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    Cool Where My Jews At?

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    With Rosh Hashanah approaching, I'm curious who among you are Jewish and living a primal lifestyle?

    Do you modify your eating habits around this time of year, when high-carb items like challah, apples, and honey are prevalent?

    I personally plan on baking two loaves of challah: one for myself and my boyfriend (mostly the latter, obviously!) and one for my coworkers. I don't plan on having more than a slice or two of the stuff, but for me the tradition is very important on a personal level. I will have apples and [raw, local] honey, too.

    How about other holidays and celebrations? Culturally we are very much about gatherings, most of which revolve around food! Noodle kugel, challah, bagels... yikes! Luckily chopped liver and lox are definitely primal and delicious.

    I'm anxious for next year's Passover because it is my favorite holiday. I do love me some matzoh and matzoh ball soup, so I may plan on splurging on gluten-free matzoh when the time comes, though I've heard it's not very good and definitely falls in the "20%". I also adore making my mom's recipe of charoset for the holiday! Hi, carbs and alcohol! *sigh*

    So, what's your plan for the New Year? How has being Primal affected your Jewish way of life, celebrations, etc.?
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    I am planning out my menu for Sunday night as we speak. I am going to make a roast chicken with a balsmic honey glaze, and then have onions, apples, carrots roasting along since the bird. Raw Honey, organic apples and chicken of course. Going to have Challah as well (mostly for husband) and I will have a slice or two (its the holidays and I think 100% fine - espiecally if its from a good quailty bakery). going to skip on all the other stuff and save it for the challah bread. I will probably do some roasted veggies on the side as well. Debating making marcoon cookies but since its egg whites, honey and coconut - this would be sticking within Primal/Paleo and not cheating in my eyes.

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    Passover is the easiest holiday ever for me. I don't eat legumes nor gluten so basically no change.
    Matzot taste like nothing, get stuck in your teeth, hurts the belly. I hate it yet as a child I could eat loads of 'em with nuttela
    Honey and apples are always ok! Try putting them ob 120 for 30m, sprinkle cinnamon and honey.. Great desert!

    חג שמח ושנה טובה!
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    Actually, watching In Search of the Perfect Human Diet recently, I was struck at how many Jews spearheaded the American transition away from saturated fat and toward high carb, basically creating the S.A.D.

    For instance, Gary Taubes explained the significance of the Jane Brody and New York Times promoting high carb and grain while demonizing fat in the 1950's as the real big start of the S.A.D. And then all of the speakers at the vegetarian seminar were Jews (at least it seemed that way). Jews also seem over-represented at the governmental agencies which promote the Standard American Diet.

    I'm reading the genetics book, 'The 10,000 Year Explosion', and it's interesting because it talks a lot about how very recent evolution has made some people MUCH more adapted to dairy (lactose tolerance, obviously), grain (gluten tolerance), and other very modern components of the human lifestyle. I'd theorize that Ashkenazi Jews are probably much more adapted to high carb and low-fat diets, and this explains why they promote this lifestyle. It would also partially explain why Jews tend to seem so lean (moreso than the average American gentile) and seem to live so long (again, comparatively). I don't know, obviously, but these are thoughts that spring to mind as I read this book and survey the paleo community.
    Last edited by DavidBrennan; 09-13-2012 at 08:30 AM.

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    I'm only a Jew twice removed. My partner is catholic but three of his siblings converted, plus he's from Long Island. I don't know much about Jewish culture, but I have to say that every Jewish food I've ever been served has been super delicious.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
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    Rosh Hashanah Dinner | Elana's Pantry

    Elana comes to the rescue with (somewhat) paleo/primal recipes!

    As for Passover, there's this gluten-free matzoh bread my uncle came across to accommodate my sister and me that was like crack and everyone else started stealing it as it tasted better than the regular matzoh bread >:| I want to say it was potato based? (and I guess, you'd have to pass on it if you're Orthodox, but whatev's, I'm not)

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    I'm not Jewish, but I went to a Jewish university and miss pretending. The apples+honey is delicious incorporated into a roasted veggie. Specifically, I'm thinking brussels sprouts. I made a gefilte fish loaf once and it was a complete hit.

    I always just passed on the challah, but if I were actually Jewish I might have just had it the one time every week. I'll bet you can easily buy/make a gluten-free challah (a grain-free one of course is iffy... and probably not very good). (But I'm with you -- if it's just a high holidays thing, I'd enjoy some real challah).

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    MissJecka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unsuperb View Post
    Rosh Hashanah Dinner | Elana's Pantry

    Elana comes to the rescue with (somewhat) paleo/primal recipes!

    As for Passover, there's this gluten-free matzoh bread my uncle came across to accommodate my sister and me that was like crack and everyone else started stealing it as it tasted better than the regular matzoh bread >:| I want to say it was potato based? (and I guess, you'd have to pass on it if you're Orthodox, but whatev's, I'm not)
    That link has officially been bookmarked. Thank you so much for sharing! The cakes she has shared look amazing.

    Yeah, again, I've heard of the gluten-free matzoh, as my cousin's wife eats gluten-free and kosher. She said that they don't taste like matzoh at all, so she was kind of sad, but it worked well for her anyway. Any idea if they could be ground down to make matzoh meal for matzoh balls?
    >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
    >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

    >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
    >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

    Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

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    Rojo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidBrennan View Post
    I'd theorize that Ashkenazi Jews are probably much more adapted to high carb and low-fat diets, and this explains why they promote this lifestyle. It would also partially explain why Jews tend to seem so lean (moreso than the average American gentile) and seem to live so long (again, comparatively). I don't know, obviously, but these are thoughts that spring to mind as I read this book and survey the paleo community.
    It's easy to veer into "just so" stories with this stuff but I think you're on to something. For example, look how huge American Indians and Pacific Islanders get with SAD. They're only a few generations removed from a primal diet.

    I'm not Jewish, mostly northern European mutt (Irish, Scot, Dutch, French) and lo and behold I'm dairy tolerant like nobody's business. I actually drink milk to settle my stomach.

    But I

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidBrennan View Post
    Actually, watching In Search of the Perfect Human Diet recently, I was struck at how many Jews spearheaded the American transition away from saturated fat and toward high carb, basically creating the S.A.D.

    For instance, Gary Taubes explained the significance of the Jane Brody and New York Times promoting high carb and grain while demonizing fat in the 1950's as the real big start of the S.A.D. And then all of the speakers at the vegetarian seminar were Jews (at least it seemed that way). Jews also seem over-represented at the governmental agencies which promote the Standard American Diet.

    I'm reading the genetics book, 'The 10,000 Year Explosion', and it's interesting because it talks a lot about how very recent evolution has made some people MUCH more adapted to dairy (lactose tolerance, obviously), grain (gluten tolerance), and other very modern components of the human lifestyle. I'd theorize that Ashkenazi Jews are probably much more adapted to high carb and low-fat diets, and this explains why they promote this lifestyle. It would also partially explain why Jews tend to seem so lean (moreso than the average American gentile) and seem to live so long (again, comparatively). I don't know, obviously, but these are thoughts that spring to mind as I read this book and survey the paleo community.
    Several things.
    The last time I checked, Jewish tradition wasn't vegetarian. There is a huge amount of fat in Jewish cuisine. There is a scary number of obese Jews, particularly among Orthodox. Jews actually were the first victims of Crisco campaign. The company targeted Jews because Jews avoid mixing dairy (butter for example) and meat and Crisco correctly guessed that they might be interested in vegetable oils. I don't know how common is wheat/dairy intolerance among Jews. I know that some digestive illnesses are common among Jews and I think that dairy is counter indicated. Jane Brody and most certainly the NYT have very little to do with Jewishness in any sense (I am Jewish and have a degree in Jewish history). And how do you judge whether a person is Jewish or not?
    And yes, I followed your link and a surprise there .... Michelle Obama is Jewish. Well, it's nice when a guy named Brennan shows up on a pre-holiday thread with a "charming" comment. Actually, David, Happy New Year would be more appropriate.
    Last edited by anna5; 09-13-2012 at 08:49 PM.

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