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Thread: A Treatise on Strength page 2

  1. #11
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrPAssasin View Post
    All the links are fixed. The feedback really helps
    Thanks for writing this. It is clear and well written, and I am going to try and be more mindful of the precepts it contains.

    I do have a couple of minor gribbles. The green hyperlinks are annoying. The Page 2 link on the introduction still seems to be broken. And the page nagivation could be much more streamlined and web savvy. Ideally, you would have the following at the footer of each of the four pages:

    A Treatise on Strength: Prev 1 2 3 4 Next
    Where you change the 'Prev' and 'Next' links on each page, and turn the url for the current page into a bold tag instead.
    Last edited by magicmerl; 09-09-2012 at 04:28 PM.
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  3. #13
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    @Magicmerl, thanks for the feedback. I'm, totally, with you on the infolinks, but if they bring in a couple bucks the blog pays for itself. I use Firefox and they don't even show up on my browser.

    As for the footer, I have implemented your idea. Thanks for that.

  4. #14
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    I really enjoyed reading this (part 3 was my favorite part)

    I've often though about how Survial of the Fittest doesn't seem to apply to humanity anymore (at least in the industrialized First World). Babies born prematurely years ago would have died, but today it's a normal occurance...diseases and infections that would have wiped out the sickly are now treated with medecines, and those people keep living, which in my opinion has led to weaker and weaker genes.

    I, myself would have died from a variety of childhood illnesses I contracted, if I'd been born 100 years ago. Of course, no one would prefer a loved on to die for the sake of improving the gene pool, that's ridiculous, but I do wonder about the cumulative affect this has on us as a species.

    In part 4, you mentioned that children routinely worked 14 hour days in mines and mills, which they not only survived, but led to them thriving, making them stronger, but most of those children likely developed some pretty serious health consequences as a result of that (black lung is the first that comes to mind). Did I misinterpret the point you were making?

  5. #15
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    @BestBetter, I'm glad you enjoyed it!

    As far as the 14 hour days, a bunch of them probably did die, but the mill workers wouldn't have caught black lung. Also, a whole generation of early industrial revolution children didn't just die off and those industries still flourished. The point I was making is that we, as a species, can survive and even thrive through many situations. And, we have.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrPAssasin View Post
    @BestBetter, I'm glad you enjoyed it!

    As far as the 14 hour days, a bunch of them probably did die, but the mill workers wouldn't have caught black lung. Also, a whole generation of early industrial revolution children didn't just die off and those industries still flourished. The point I was making is that we, as a species, can survive and even thrive through many situations. And, we have.
    Yes, the black lung comment was specific to the mine workers. I completely agree that we as a species can survive many horribly stressful situations (an atomic bomb, for example), but I don't know that surviving those situations always makes us stronger. The mill workers, for example, had a high probability of experiencing accidents that likely left them disabled, they spent every daylight hour inside the mill (or factory) meaning that they were probably drastically deficient in vitamin D. Many sweatshop workers, epecially the women who were working in the garment industry, went blind or had significantly damaged sight from doing so much work with really poor lighting. The mill workers were breathing sawdust on a daily basis, and likely developped infections or disorders...plus there's the whole 'mental strength' aspect that probably went down the toilet for all those folk working monotonous factory job... performing a mindless, prideless task for 12-16 hours 6+ days a week can really rob a person of their joy in life.

    I think the working conditions in the beginnings of the industrial age more likely contributed to the destruction of health and strength rather than making people stronger.

    However, that's my only criticism, and I loved everything else in the article!
    Last edited by BestBetter; 09-11-2012 at 02:06 AM.

  7. #17
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    Thanks everyone for the feedback and criticisms, I appreciate you taking the time.

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