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Thread: The Paloe/Primal Adaptations of Russian Food page 3

  1. #21
    Leida's Avatar
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    Primal Fuel
    What you are talking about back home was called "Blinchiki". The fillings was either the quark filling or ground beef filling. Accordingly, they were called either 'Blinchiki s Myasom' or "Blinchiki s Tvorogom" (Blinchiki with Meat or with Quark). There were even layered pies made sort of like casserole bakes here or macaroni pies.

    Those were very often made after Mardi-Gras from the all leftover crepes! Just when you thought you can't face another one....

    It can be replicated relatively painlessly & successfully, though not in the quantities my grandma would make, lol, once you muster the art of making grain-free crepes from cream cheese and eggs.

    Now, Pirogi/Pirozhki in Russian tradition is an elongated bun of yest dough with a LOT of various fillings.
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  2. #22
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    Fabulous Leida, thank you for identifying it. yes I am familiar with the other Pirogis. Not sure why my family called the Blinchikis perogis. Weird but so is my family. Glad to have finally identified them.


    "once you muster the art of making grain-free crepes from cream cheese and eggs. "

    Now is that even possible? Not that I can eat cream cheese but very curious.

    Thanks for all your information. Love the blinchikis! Now to figure out if I am pronouncing that correctly.

  3. #23
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    I am loving this thread -thank for sharing your recipes ... Warms my northern New England heart with all of the hearty food. I'll be trying these recipes now the fall is upon us.

  4. #24
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    The Way the Cabbage Rolls (Cont'd)

    The first thing about making the cabbage rolls is to muster the cabbage. Cabbage selection is an art. I prefer tight, light and flatter cabbages to the round, green and loose ones. So did my grandma. Must be hereditary.

    For two of the 3 variations on Golubtzy (or Cabbage Rolls) you will need to learn to undress the cabbage. Do not expect to be able to go from the outer shell to the very core. Getting 15 leaves is great, a dozen is about average from a garden variety cabbage. I remove the outer cabbage leaves, steam them for a few minutes till they soften, immerse in the ice-cold water in the sink, drain in a colander, let drip dry on a paper towel, then cut off the back of the thick portion of the leaf. For mini-rolls the leaves can be broken, so you could keep stripping more than the premium outer leaves.


    The Second Way: Classic Golubtzy (Cabbage Rolls)

    At least a dozen of cabbage leaves prepared as described above
    2-4 large carrots, grated
    1 large onion, minced
    A mix of ground meats, beef, pork, lamb, turkey or anything else to come up to 1 to 1&1/2 lbs (you can use all the same meat, but it’s boring!)
    6 hard-boiled eggs*
    4-5 cloves of garlic (or to taste if you aren’t into garlic)
    1 tbsp of butter or other fat of choice
    ½ to 1 cups of broth + ~ 1 tbsp of tapioca (I prefer beef broth, but tastes differ)
    ¼ to ½ cup of cream or same amount of coconut milk

    Spices: nutmeg (a pinch), caraway seed (1/2 tsp), celery seed (1/2 tsp), black pepper (1 tsp), coriander seed (1 tsp), fennel seed (1 tsp), paprika (1/2 tbsp), salt to taste, 4 to 5 bay leaves, toasted
    Herbs: lots of parsley (Italian Flat leaf. The curly one is good for flower arrangements)

    1 c of sour cream or 1 c of sour-cream + 8 oz can of tomato paste or 16 oz of tomato paste; paprika (1 tbsp) and cayenne pepper (1/4 to ½ teaspoon) or ~ ¼ cup butter.

    Toothpicks or cooking string

    Optional: a handful of raisins!

    *Hard boiled eggs is the OMG, PRIMALIZATION! If you are acceptant of rice, add a cup of boiled rice will serve.

    When you are making classic Golubtzy you first to have Zen style acceptance of the fact that you will never have the perfect quantities of filling vs leaves. Have hollowed out peppers or zucchinis on hand to stuff the rest of the filling in. Golubtzy won’t mind sharing the pan with stuffed peppers or zucchinis. Honest.

    Step 1: Mix your meats together. Brown in batches till they are brown and quite crisp. Drain, and rinse under hot water if desired.

    Step 2: Grind all spices together except the bay leaves.

    Step 3: Either use the drippings from the meat or melt the fat of choice or turn the fatty bacon into bacon grease. Toss in minced onions (and parsley root if using; most people do not have it on hand, so yeah, it is very optional). Let it sweat till translucent. Add crashed or sliced garlic and the ground spices. Once the mix becomes to dry out, reduce to really-really low setting, and mix back in beef, parsley and grated carrots. If needed, drip in some broth.

    Step 4: Mush the boiled eggs with a potato musher. Mix them into the filling. Mix in enough cream to keep everything moist, but not drippy. If you are not willing to use cream, mix in a tbsp of tapioca in about ½ cup of hot broth, pour in and let cook till it thickens and moistens the filling. Again, the goal is moist but not drippy. Adjust seasoning (well, okay, add salt & freshly ground pepper if it doesn’t feel just right!), and turn the pan off. Let cool to comfortable handling temperature.

    Step 5: If you are going to bake your Golubtzy, pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F. Mix the paprika (1 tbsp) and cayenne pepper (1/4 to ½ teaspoon) into 2 cups of sour cream; or 2 cups of tomato paste or mix paste, sour-cream and spices in a small bowl. It will top Golubtzy. If you want to fry your Golubtzy, just have the butter handy.

    Step 6: Fill and roll individual rolls, secure each with a toothpick or a string around it. Pack into a baking dish tightly if you are going to bake your Golubtzy. Put them onto a transitional holding plate until you finish them all.

    Step 7: If baking, dump the sauce on top of the Golubtzy, and slip into the oven for an hour or until hot and bubbly. Once the sauce is hot and happy, put a wooden board on the table, and place the baking dish on it. Let everyone fish out just enough Golubetz’s and sauce to suit personal preference.

    If you are frying your Golubtzy, heat the butter in a large pan, and gently place each Golubetz into the frying pan, then flip it over even more gently once the base has browned up. To compensate for the heart-breaking lack of sour-cream in a fried version, serve with a bowl of sour-cream, and top the Golubtzy with chopped chives and parsley… be creative. Be bold.
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  5. #25
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    I cannot wait to try this version!! Thank you Leida!

  6. #26
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    For two of the 3 variations on Golubtzy (or Cabbage Rolls) you will need to learn to undress the cabbage. Do not expect to be able to go from the outer shell to the very core. Getting 15 leaves is great, a dozen is about average from a garden variety cabbage. I remove the outer cabbage leaves, steam them for a few minutes till they soften, immerse in the ice-cold water in the sink, drain in a colander, let drip dry on a paper towel, then cut off the back of the thick portion of the leaf. For mini-rolls the leaves can be broken, so you could keep stripping more than the premium outer leaves.

    Now, if you do not want to deal with the cabbage stripping, the first recipe is for you. Well, that is if you are comfortable with chopping the cabbage.

    The Third Way: Crazy Easy Cabbage Rolls.

    Now, this one is an East meets East sort of a recipe.

    A bunch of half to quarter cabbage leaves prepared as above and cut into somewhat triangular shapes (or polygonal)
    8 or so baby carrots, grated (about ½ cup)
    1 lbs ground turkey
    1 clove of garlic (or to taste if you aren’t into garlic)
    1/4 tbsp of butter or other fat of choice
    Nutmeg, 5-spcie, cinnamon, freshly ground black pepper, Sichuan pepper: about ½ tbsp in all
    Sesame oil 1 tbsp
    Chopped cilantro 1 tbsp

    Optional: cream or sour cream (Full Fat, please), soy sauce (for dipping)

    Step 1: Brown your turkey with butter and spices until brown and quite crisp.

    Step 2: Add sesame oil and grated carrots and cilantro if using. Turn off the pan.

    Step 3: Roll about 1 tbsp of filling into each piece of cabbage leaf. Secure with a toothpick if it is totally falling apart.

    Step 4: Serve with you fav acceptable oriental dipping sauce or soy sauce or wow, coconut aminos if you have them. Otherwise, keep it a-la Russe and serve with sour cream.
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  7. #27
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    I have to share this here: I got water kefir grains, and if it is made with half molasses, half coconut sugar it tastes exactly like bread kvass! I added a bit of soda water to mine to make it fizzy, but I hear that you can double ferment for it as well.

    So, guess what? A Primal adaptation of Kvass and of Okroshka!!!

    Normally, people in the West don't really think of Russians as someone combating heat. But the summers in Russia are actually quite hot, so we are big on cold soups. Okroshka is one of them.

    To make Okroshka for 4 people, you need to fine chop:

    4 medium sized cold potatoes
    4 hardboiled cold eggs
    8 oz (250 g) or more of cold boiled beef or sausage of kolbasa type that you find acceptable
    about half of a long English cucumber (fine dice)
    8-10 red radishes sliced thinly
    1 bunch of chives or spring onions, chopped
    fresh dill to taste

    Chop and mix everything but dill. Put about 1 to 2 cups of the dry mix in your bowl. Top with chilled water kefir (the colder the better!) Add a tbsp of sour cream if desired and top with chopped dill. Add salt to taste, swirl the spoon, and enjoy your cold soup like you're in Moscow!
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
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