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  1. #1
    MissJecka's Avatar
    MissJecka is offline Senior Member
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    Talking Nourishing Traditions

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    I saw a Naturopathic Doctor last night for the first time. Because I love to cook, she suggested that to combat some small intestine/bacterial issues I should not only purchase some fermented stuff (kraut, etc.), but I should check out the Nourishing Traditions cookbook.

    The reviews online seem to contain nothing but praise. It's obvious that grains are still "OK" in this book, and I'm not an idiot - I don't plan on cooking with grains just because a cookbook says to. My main reason to check this out is because I love cookbooks, I love cooking, and I love eating real food.

    For those in the primal/paleo/grain-free community - tell me this: Are there a good variety of recipes? Are the non-recipe portions a good read? Any favorite recipes that have won you (or your family) over?

    Thanks!
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    Belforte is offline Senior Member
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    I found the introduction really good reading and also the section on stocks and broths. There is also a big section on fermenting food, but I have not done that yet, but it did look interesting.
    Life. Be in it.

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    I love that book and use it a lot. Although there are grains, there are also a lot of primal friendly recipes and a lot of really good information on food and nutrition. I'd say it's well worth buying, and it's a large, thick book so tons of recipes and info in general.

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    Great book, tasty recipies too! Well worth getting. We use it more than any other cookbook in our house. Sure not 100% primal, but very close and conscious of the need to sprout / soak all the potential bad stuff.

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    onalark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissJecka View Post
    For those in the primal/paleo/grain-free community - tell me this: Are there a good variety of recipes? Are the non-recipe portions a good read? Any favorite recipes that have won you (or your family) over?
    I'm of two minds on it.

    1) I like the recipes. I don't love them...but I like them. I think they're good guidelines for developing your own future recipes. I find the spices to be a little tame and possibly even bland. It's a very "American" cookbook in that way, and by "American" I mean "midwest, where ketchup is considered spicy".

    2) I'm less inclined to like the rhetoric. I don't really want it in a cookbook, and I ignore most of it. But then, I don't need convincing that lard's not scary and industrial seed oils are crap.

    Also, they have a thing against chocolate. Which is -- meh. Whatever.

    So I guess I think it's okay? It's good, and I'd probably feel it was great without the agendariffic blah blah blah.

    I think I like "Full Moon Feast" better. Also a WAPF-supported book, but also part-memoir. A very pleasant read with some good recipes by a woman (Jessica Prentice) who part-runs a coop kitchen in the Bay Area.

  6. #6
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    I did enjoy the book a lot - but I got it from the library and just read it through once or twice. I don't think it is something one would need to own.

    If you are already primal, much of the info on soaking and sprouting won't be helpful for you.

    If you are interested in adding fermented food to your diet, I really liked Wild Ferment by Sandor Katz.
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

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  7. #7
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    We have it and enjoy it. It's our go-to recipe book on fermenting and sprouting.

    And while we don't go for anything grain based any more, it's still largely in line with primal principles.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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  8. #8
    MissJecka's Avatar
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    I may check it out from the local library before buying it. I mainly want to dive into fermented foods a bit more, and get some good basic recipes that I can twist around and make changes to to make them my own. I am a cookbook-lover and wouldn't mind another entering my library, but renting it first is probably a good way to go!

    Thanks, everyone. Keep the opinions coming!
    >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
    >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

    >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
    >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

    Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

  9. #9
    Iron Fireling's Avatar
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    I think it's a good book, and well worth reading. Yes, they say grains are okay (as long as they're properly prepared) but in general it's quite primal, really... just make the stuff without grains (I used to love preparing my rice the NT way though lol).

  10. #10
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    I've got the book and love it -- it was a step in my journey to primal. It got me over my fear of eating animal fats (lots of good scientific info about why animal fats are good for you). It also got me eating liver again. I thought liver was where the modern toxins accumulate so I quit eating it, now I've started eating it again and realized how much I missed it. I like her idea of soaking liver in lemon juice (I add water so I'm not using quite so many lemons). Although she suggests breading the liver with flour, I just cut it in strips and stir fry it plain in bacon fat with sliced onions (I start the onions first and when they are mostly cooked I add the liver). I also like her directions for sauerkraut -- it isn't that hard and you only need to make a quart jar at a time, not a huge crock full. Her fermented dill pickles are really easy too -- I'll probably be going to the farmer's market this week and get a bucket of baby cucumbers for a batch of her dill pickles. She has ways for cooking all kinds of meats -- I'm going to try one of her duck recipes this week. And she gives directions for soaking and drying nuts, which isn't as much of a problem as Mark seems to think -- especially if you have a dehydrator. My son-in-law with IBS says it really makes the nuts much more digestible for him. The salad dressings, and mayonnaise recipes are wonderful too. Just a few of the many things I like about this cookbook!
    Ruth

    "I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody."
    ~Bill Cosby

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

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