Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 51

Thread: I work for CW doctors and sometimes their advice makes me cringe page 2

  1. #11
    RobinNM's Avatar
    RobinNM is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    126
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabine View Post
    Nix on Ensure and Boost as well, but this is the part that caught my attention:

    The patient is losing weight while eating the same.
    The NP tells her 'not eating is not a good way to lose weight', completely disregarding what the patient is telling her: that she is eating the same.
    Obviously something besides calories is going on.

    How about investigating that?
    But it is so much easier to assume that the patient is lying or 'just doesn't know'.
    While this may be the case, is it something to assume?
    How about starting with the idea that the patient will tell her NP the truth. After all, she's there for help, right?
    We're also assuming that medical practitioners actually listen. After four years of doing these kinds of reports, I am NOT a fan of nurse practitioners. A couple of them in this practice sound very good from their reports, but they've got a couple who can't even pronounce the chemo medications correctly and this is an oncology practice.

    My mom was 5' 2" and overweight her whole adult life. About 5 years before she died she started gaining weight and gaining a lot of weight. She said something about this to her doctor. She also told him very specifically that she was not doing anything differently with her eating habits. He completely ignored her and just said she needed to lose weight. This went on for a couple of years and she got more and more uncomfortable (and bigger) and finally ended up in the ER having a paracentesis. That's where they basically stick a tube in the side of your stomach and drain out all the fluid that has accumulated. I think that day they took of something crazy like 6 to 8 liters of fluid. But she just needed to lose weight...

    She also needed to get a better doctor but no one in this town was accepting new Medicare patients. The fluid was ascites and that is generally (and was indeed in Mom's case) a sign of the liver not working appropriately. Mom was a diabetic and none of this raised a flag for her idiot doctor.

    I work for doctors and they provide me a decent living, but some days ...

  2. #12
    Moll's Avatar
    Moll is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by healthy11 View Post
    It's devastating because the right nutrition could be the key to these patients survival and they're drinking Ensure. It just makes me sick. It's just hard to believe that we live in such a time that this is the norm and that it's considered the right practice... the right advice.
    Completely agree. I'm also appalled by the lack of nutrition classes/training it takes to become a doctor! We literally are what we eat - shouldn't that be the biggest component of diagnosing and treating illness? It seems almost impossible that the nutritional aspect of medical training will improve, as it is completely antithetical to Big Pharma...and I find that sad beyond belief. These poor people go to their doctors looking for help, and instead they get a good dose of whatever watered-down death will benefit these multi-billion dollar industries.

  3. #13
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,090
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabine View Post
    How about investigating that?
    But it is so much easier to assume that the patient is lying or 'just doesn't know'.
    While this may be the case, is it something to assume?
    How about starting with the idea that the patient will tell her NP the truth. After all, she's there for help, right?
    So true. And so frustrating.

    A person can be unaware, of course, or lying, but why not just take them at their word? I don't know.

    I remember when I had a pituitary tumor, the doctor kept asking me over and over how much marijuana I used. I didn't (and don't and never have) used any. The symptoms that I had could be caused by that, and he wanted to rule out whether or not I needed an MRI. He said "you have to be honest with me. there's no reason why a young woman like you should have this problem, unless you're using too much marijuana." and then, when I left his office, he said "try using less marijuana and maybe it will go away."

    I was so frustrated. He then ordered an MRI which he said "I'm sure will show up with nothing, as this is probably caused by your excessive marijuana use."

    Jerk.

    Turns out it was a pituitary tumor, and thankfully it healed itself after I went vegan. I haven't had any problems since, and I've been unmedicated for the issue since the day it was discovered, but in all honesty, I was really, really annoyed that he figured that I was lying the whole time.

    Because it's not like a 19 yr old girl could be telling the truth about that, right?

  4. #14
    zoebird's Avatar
    zoebird is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    8,090
    I hear you there, RobinNM.

    My friend's mother went through hell in a similar situation. She was older, but not that old really (she was in her 60s for goodness sakes), and she was complaining of stomach pains. She would go to the doctor and say that she had pains, etc. He diagnosed her with depression!

    Three years later, she was hardly eating, and her belly looked like she'd swallowed a basketball. She was in so much pain she couldn't stand anymore, and I happened to get a good look at her when I helped her bathe and dress for a special event that she wanted to attend.

    I suggested to her son (my friend) that they go and see a different doctor, because this was not "depression." He made an appointment, and they saw a different doctor who asked her about her symptoms and then asked "why would your other doctor think you were depressed?" She didn't know.

    He sent her to the hospital immediately, where they discovered a massive stomach cancer. It was the size of a small basketball! Once they had that removed, she was able to eat again, but my goodness, she needed so much physical therapy just to manage her muscle atrophy from not walking for a long time. She was back on her feet in about 6 months, and very normal. She then got another cancer, and went through chemo and another surgery, and ultimately died about 2 years after the initial cancer had been finally "discovered."

    Her new doctor said that if her original doctor had sought out what was wrong with her before, then she likely would have had a better quality of life over that time, and possibly better treatment early on would have kept her from needing treatment later.

  5. #15
    emmie's Avatar
    emmie is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,296
    Re Zoebird's experience

    A couple of years ago, I collapsed in a public building, EMT's told me that since I could not sustain my BP to stand I needed to go to the ER.

    After tests, ER doctor diagnosed 'pancreatitis' and asked me about my alcohol consumption--which is miniscule. I will have an occasional glass of wine with a restaurant meal, and that occurs about once a month. But what I didn't know at the time is that 'pancreatitis' is common among alcoholics, so doctor and nurses kept at me about my 'drinking'--and no one would believe that I don't have a 'drinking problem.'

    The next morning, my own GI arrived and told me that he suspected that I'd passed a tiny gallstone that had 'tipped' the pancreas, which is apparently super-sensitive [I had had an intense stomach pain just prior to passing out.] Everything had resolved, and no further treatment was necessary.

    I remain furious with the ER personnel who insisted on fitting me into their 'textbook' knowledge. Someone told me once that to earn an MD, you don't have to be smart; you just have to be able to memorize. That's why there are so many medical people who can't go beyond their basic textbook info.

  6. #16
    meeme's Avatar
    meeme is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Pennswoods
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Moll View Post
    Completely agree. I'm also appalled by the lack of nutrition classes/training it takes to become a doctor! We literally are what we eat - shouldn't that be the biggest component of diagnosing and treating illness? It seems almost impossible that the nutritional aspect of medical training will improve, as it is completely antithetical to Big Pharma...and I find that sad beyond belief. These poor people go to their doctors looking for help, and instead they get a good dose of whatever watered-down death will benefit these multi-billion dollar industries.
    Yes. I would add "do no harm" to it as well. I ended up in the hospital near death a little over a year ago. I can thank my quick recovery on the fact that in my 50's I was fit and healthy. I ended up there due to a pneumonia and dehydration from a recently diagnosed CC. While I was there (3 weeks) I could eat almost nothing because I'm gluten and dairy intolerant. I was shocked at the lack of provisions for someone like myself with a special diet. The next time I went to my gastro and told him how I was eating, grain and dairy free, he says "you don't have to be that strict. My mouth fell open and I got mad. This same person wanted me off the one med that controlled the big D and every time I tried within 24 hours symptoms would appear again...I told him, he said, "Well wear a diaper" as though that was an option to strive for. WTF!!! I finally figured out, on my own, that I had MAST cell involvement and taking an antihistamine and avoiding high histamine foods solved my problem. I haven't been back. It's criminal.

    Oh, whilst in the hospital they pushed Ensure on me...LOL

  7. #17
    Quies's Avatar
    Quies is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Naples, Florida
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabine View Post
    <snip>
    But it is so much easier to assume that the patient is lying or 'just doesn't know'.
    While this may be the case, is it something to assume?
    How about starting with the idea that the patient will tell her NP the truth. After all, she's there for help, right?
    When I was in high school, I was diagnosed with epilepsy (Up until that point it had been a "seizure disorder") and the neurologist I was seeing put me on ever increasing doses of medication that weren't working. At one point, right after he had upped the dose again, I started falling asleep in classes I liked when I had never fallen asleep in any class before. I told him and he said that it would go away when I got used to the medication. It never did. I weaned myself off when I started college and while it got marginally better over time, the drowsiness has never gone away.

    Just before I started college I had to get a TB test and a tetanus shot on the same day. The nurse was giving me the shots and the family doctor and my mom were in the room as well. After the first shot I started feeling an aura so I asked the nurse to wait a few minutes because I wasn't feeling well. She said I would be fine, stuck me the second time, and I was out. Found out from my mom later that the doctor and nurse had panicked and she had had to put her arm over me to make sure I stayed on the table and calmed down the doctor and nurse. When they were calm they actually asked her "You've been through this before, haven't you?" Of course, the fact that it said I was epileptic on the chart the doctor was looking at didn't mean anything...

    More recently, I had to have blood drawn for a physical. My dad had brought me and he stayed in the waiting room. On the way to the chair I explained to the nurse that I was epileptic and have had seizures when I have been stuck with needles in the past and if I did just to leave me, I'd be fine. She stuck me, I was out. I woke up in the usual fog but started panicking because I could not breathe and it really didn't help that I had a half dozen nurses standing over me telling me I needed to calm down and control my breathing. It turns out that they had treated me for fainting (I collapse when I have a grand mal, I don't flail or shake) and when the ammonia didn't wake me up, they kept using it until I did. They did not tell my dad, who was literally on the other side of the door, or the doctor who had sent me down for the test.

    These were three different practices, in three different cities, in two different states and does not include the numerous smaller incidents with doctors/nurses not paying attention to what I have to say. :/

  8. #18
    primalperson1's Avatar
    primalperson1 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    16
    Yes, this is so scary and disgusting. When my brother had cancer he found a woman who was living well with the kind of cancer he had (liver et al), and she did it by eating certain types of mushrooms. My brother died several years ago, but I'm eating more mushrooms now and I would never believe what most docs tell me (certainly about nutrition!). Dr. Gundry is one doc who is on board with proper and clean nutrition. I follow his directions which are similar to Marks. See Diet Evolution or google Dr. Gundry.

  9. #19
    meeme's Avatar
    meeme is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Pennswoods
    Posts
    119
    Does anyone know anything about Dr Mercola? I've heard good things about him as well but haven't read much on his website...I'll be honest his selling products puts me off. Thanks for the rec. PP1.

  10. #20
    phigment's Avatar
    phigment is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    florida
    Posts
    394
    one time I went to the er because of an asthma attac. I told the dr I get an allergic reaction to prednisone. He told me prednisone is they give to people for allergies and I must be confused. I told him I wanted another dr.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •