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Thread: Need Advice from Those who Lift Properly and Understand the Body page

  1. #1
    Louisa655's Avatar
    Louisa655 is offline Senior Member
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    Need Advice from Those who Lift Properly and Understand the Body

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    Hi, everyone. I do a combination of body conditioning exercises at home and some light lifting with 10lb hand weights.

    Four years ago I SEVERELY herniated a disc a L5/S1 -- this is the lowest disc that sit inside the pelvis. Surgery is not recommended however I manage this injury every day. I feel pain daily when I sit for too long. Exercises like skipping rope causes pain. I'd like to lift weights CAREFULLY but am worried about doing more harm and ending up on my back in the hospital again (never want to go there again).

    Is there anyone qualified on this forum who can recommend what lifting exercises I can safely do and what I should completely avoid? I have no problem making some new purchases of lifting equipment (bar/plates) from our Fitness Depot Store.

    I currently carefully do squats, paying close attention to form but I do not use a bar with weights.

    Please also advise if I should have a slight curve to my spine when I lift or if that will exacerbate a herniated disc even more.

    Thanks for your help/advice on this.

    /louisa
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    F, 48, 5'10"
    Start Date: 25-06-12 @ 161lbs
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    Started Cross Fit 20.12.12 ---- Can't wait to submit my success story on the 1st anniversary of starting primal.

  2. #2
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    Hi Louisa. I honestly would go to a chiropractor to get some advise especially with the herniation. I was having some L 4-5 issues recently and once they where on the way to healing I asked my chiro if I should be still doing squats ( I use bar and weights) and he said absolutely. Its a primal movement. I think your back needs to arch if you are doing them correctly so I would really get some advise from someone who really knows backs and the movements required in a proper squat. I've never had a herniation but from what I hear you don't want to aggravate it!

  3. #3
    Goldie's Avatar
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    I went to a chiropractor for neck/whiplash injuries and what he did actually masked the true source of my pain (not spinal at all), and seemed to have made my whiplash recovery slower. Maybe I just had a bad chiropractor, although he was recommended by several people. So I hesitate about going along with the recommendation to see a chiropractor.

    I would recommend that you find a weight lifting coach who understands your issues and can teach and supervise your lifts in person. Written and video instruction is no substitute for having someone watch your form in person--and your back is too important to take risks.

  4. #4
    Dirlot's Avatar
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    I would consult your doctor and I would consider a good bodyweight program Convict Conditioning or PBF. You can build a lot of solid muscle using bodyweight exercises.
    Eating primal is not a diet, it is a way of life.
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  5. #5
    snoops's Avatar
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    Goldie my only problem with a weight lifting coach is their level of kinowledge about the body particularly the spine. My trainer was a kinesiology grad and so I felt like she knew what she was talking about. Some of these trainers though become such after a weekend course!! And I watch them in the gym and cringe because I swear they are going to injure these poor "just starting out" people.

  6. #6
    Owly's Avatar
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    I'd look for a well-certified trainer who has expertise in working with people with injuries and/or a good physiotherapist (preferably both). In my case, working with a good physio along with a qualified trainer made a huge difference in being able to lift after a major knee injury. Ideally, the professionals you're working with should also be willing to talk to each other--my physio was happy to answer my trainer's questions, and she was also on board with working collaboratively to get the best results and work with the rehabilitation process.
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    EvRevFit's Avatar
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    I agree with both Dirlot and Owly. Both are good options to get you started. Also, a good qualified chiropractor would be able to help...just make sure to do your research before letting one work on you.
    Josh Vernier, CPT

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  8. #8
    Louisa655's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone -- such good advice. I have a good chiropractor and I will seek his input on weight lifting. Two years ago I was working with a professional weightlifter and he made all the difference. This time, I'd prefer to work out at home (maybe that's not a reasonable expectation). I have a home gym and it's easier to work out from here. I agree with the comments that some 'trainers' are weekend warrior certificate holders. I did work with a very professional lifter but had to discontinue as my school schedule caused so much conflict. I'm going to give this some thought. Although this accident happened 4 years ago, I feel the herniation every single day and I do have to manage the way I sit, lie down and still careful with how I carry my frame. After such an excruciating and serious injury, I'm mindful of not going back down that road. Thanks for your input -- I'm going to give this some serious thought.
    ----------------------------------------
    F, 48, 5'10"
    Start Date: 25-06-12 @ 161lbs
    Goal Reached: 30-09-12 @ 143lb. Now bouncing between 145lb - 149lb. I'd like less bounce and more consistency :-)

    Started Cross Fit 20.12.12 ---- Can't wait to submit my success story on the 1st anniversary of starting primal.

  9. #9
    EvRevFit's Avatar
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    Considering your condition, I would go back to recommending a bodyweight training protocol like Convict Conditioning. Bodyweight training is self-limiting in a way that you are less likely to further injure your spine. Plus most loaded training automatically compresses the spine (not always bad, even with a herniated disc, but still a risk factor).
    Josh Vernier, CPT

    My Journal

    Evolution Revolution Fitness

    "The question isn't who is going to let me; it's who is going to stop me."

    -Ayn Rand

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