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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    My husband and I also have/had a collection of seemingly random health problems that are mysterious...it seems like we're constantly getting pieces of a puzzle but can't see the whole picture, so I can sympathize that this situation must feel really overwhelming, but don't give up! I don't have any definite answers, but I can share some things that have helped us, and some insights we've gathered.

    I'm a 33 year old woman, and my husband is 29. I'm diagnosed with MS, he's got psoriatic arthritis in his knees that affects his daily life, and at times an be crippling. We both suffer from extreme fatigue. I had IBS-C for years, but anytime I told a doctor I was diagnosed with MS, they basically said the IBS was due to the MS,
    IBS is not from MS. IBS has been linked to a lack of intestinal flora, which can be built up with cultured foods and fibers.

    MS is an autoimmune disorder involving a viral infection and weak adrenal glands. The virus implicated in MS is human herpes virus type 6. The poor adrenal function leads to the over production of low affinity (nonspecific) antibodies seen in autoimmune disorders.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    and I'd just have to deal with it. Same for the fatigue. I've been convinced that I've been hypothyroid for like 20 years, because I have all the symptoms, but every blood test comes back totally normal. Also convinced I have some kind of adrenal issue. The list goes on and on, it's like going down the rabbit hole.
    Thyroid tests are notorious for missing cases of hypothyroidism for several reasons. Doing basal body temperature for at least a week is a lot more accurate in determining hypothyroidism than lab tests. An average body temperature below 97.6 along with symptoms of hypothyroidism indicate hypothyroidism regardless of what the lab tests say.

    There are numerous causes of hypothyroidism though, adrenal dysfunction being one of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Both my husband and I have been researching health issues like crazy, and over time, 2 big ideas seemed to emerge:

    1) STRESS / SLEEP
    2) GUT HEALTH

    Originally, I had been told and read that autoimmune issues CAUSE fatigue and poor sleep quality, but the deeper I dug, the more evidence I found that poor quality/not enough sleep more likely CAUSES or contributes to autoimmune and health issues.
    Autoimmune conditions do not cause poor quality sleep in most cases. But lack of sleep does not cause autoimmunity either, although it can aggravate autoimmune disorders. In fact any form of stress including lack of sleep or pain can aggravate autoimmune conditions by weakening the adrenals further. Stimulants like caffeine and nicotine and steroids like Prednisone will also weaken the adrenals further aggravating autoimmune conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Anything you can do to improve sleep quality is a priority. I find that taking 2 Benedryl generally help me reach a deep sleep, and benedryl is pretty safe as far as medicines go. Only down side is tolerance will develop if you take it chronically, so I try to not take it more than 2x/week. Some people find that supplements like magnesium before bed or melatonin help them sleep, other people find that a carby dinner works well...now is the time to experiment and find some things that promote good quality sleep.
    I would be careful with melatonin, or better just avoid it all together. The average melatonin tablet is 3mg, which is literally hundreds of thousands higher than the body will naturally produce on its own. What the adverse effects are of such high levels are long term is unknown. Shutdown of the body's own production is likely though as this happens with the substitution of other hormones.

    A good quality magnesium is great. I recommend either magnesium malate, magnesium citrate or magnesium glycinate. Magnesium oxide/hydroxide should be avoided since it is poorly absorbed and is highly laxative due to its ability to burn the intestinal wall. Magnesium works by helping to elevate serotonin levels. Although, the glycinate will also increase GABA further calming the brain.

    Chamomile, which is the highest herbal source of tryptophan also increases serotonin.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Digestive health also seems to play a major role in many SEEMINGLY unrelated health issues.

    As I mentioned before, i had IBS-C for years. It was intermittent, and actually got signifiantly worse when I cut grains and sugar from my diet and ate 100% paleo. I couldn't figure out why the heallthier and cleaner i ate, the worse my IBS got. Then, I found Fiber Menace, and together with some other information, cured my IBS over the course of several months.

    At first, I was a little confused by the gut sense site, because I couldn't find anywhere a list of what to eat/not eat. After reading the book, I realized that he doesn't specifically say that you have to eat or avoid foods, it's more about avoiding fiber in general. He recommends keeping fiber around 10g/less, but as close to zero as possible if you are suffering from an acute problem. (The book, Fiber Menace goes into more detail on different types of digestive disorders, so you might find it helpful to read since I mainly focused on the IBS-C related stuff.)
    The Fiber Menace is so full of contradictions and misinformation:

    Addressing "The Fiber Menace"


    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I've been reading a lot about chronic fatigue, because it's something that I've been struggling with, but again, since I have an MS diagnosis, doctors won't diagnose or treat CFS in me (not that they know much about CFS, anyway.) Here are some interesting links about CFS and the methylation cycle - there are suggestions for some some supplements to try to improve fatigue:

    CFS - The Central Cause: Mitochondrial Failure - DoctorMyhill

    CFS - The Methylation Cycle - DoctorMyhill
    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is not a singular thing. Syndromes are not diseases or conditions, but rather groups of symptoms that can have multiple causes. Some common causes of CFS include adrenal dysfunction and hypothyroidism.

    Methylation itself is essential to so many processes within the body. Here are more links with additional information:

    Methylation Equals Life

    Comparing SAMe, choline, DMG and TMG



    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    My stance on diet is that is really helps some people and makes a HUGE difference, and for other people it has zero effect. I started making dietary changes about 5 years ago when I had my first MS symptom. I continued to have symptoms, but overall they were relatively mild. I haven't had any flares or lesions in the past 2 years, which is likely helped by eating paleo (no dairy, gluten, soy) but I actually think my improvement is more related to some major life changes I made 2 years ago. No way to know.
    The key to successfully treating MS is to destroy the triggering virus and restore proper adrenal function first. The regeneration of myelin can then be addressed with supplements such as lecithin, EPA/DHA and B12 as methylcobalamin.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Unfortunately, eating paleo/primal has actually made me feel worse in some ways - it worsened my IBS (too much fiber!)
    Fibers are prebiotics used to treat IBS, which results from a lack of flora. There are some fibers though I would not recommend such as psyllium and hard fibers like wheat bran. I prefer soft fibers such as rice or oat bran since they are also rich in silica and B vitamins. Vegetable gums and mucilaginous fibers such as chia seed are also great.


    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    and my fatigue got worse to the point of it being crippling. Also, eating paleo coincided with my normal lowish blood pressure becoming way too low, to the point that I had trouble standing without getting dizzy. (Low blood pressure could have been contributing to the fatigue, also).
    The getting dizzy upon standing is known as orthostatic hypotension. This is a symptom of adrenal dysfunction, which again also plays a major role in the MS. Normally when we stand up gravity pulls blood away from the brain. To prevent us from getting dizzy, passing out or having a stroke the adrenals will respond by releasing epinephrine (adrenaline) to constrict the blood vessels maintaining circulation to the brain. If the adrenals do not respond quick enough because they are not working properly we get dizzy for a short spell until they kick in and restore blood flow to the brain.


    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Pregnenolone and DHEA - since it seems that your wife has some hormonal issues and some arthritis/inflammation issues. These hormones are important for a millioin different things - neurological, hormonal balancing, anti-inflammation (pregnenlone was originally studied for it's anti-arthritis properties but was eclipsed by the discovery of cortisone and then forgotten). There is some discrepancy about whether higher doses of pregenolone are safe. I've been taking 100mg/day (with periodic breaks) and I think that overall it is contributing toward my improvement.
    People need to be extremely careful about fooling with pregnenolone and DHEA. Substituting hormones for the body is just asking for trouble. It is much safer to support the glandular system to allow the body to generate what it needs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thwilson View Post
    She has very low blood pressure.
    Chronically low blood pressure is generally from poor adrenal function or severe hypothyroidism.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by thwilson View Post
    Lower blood pressure days are definitely worse for fatigue. Her normal is 90/65. The blood pressure increasing advice (eat salt and celery) has not made any difference. What worked for you?
    Salt will rarely raise blood pressure. Only about 10% of hypertensive patients are sodium sensitive so sodium is not a big factor in raising blood pressure to begin with.

    Make sure you are hydrated since dehydration can lead to low blood pressure.

    If it is not dehydration then adrenal or thyroid dysfunction are the other major possibilities.

    Adrenal dysfunction can also cause low energy, allergies, asthma, autoimmune disorders, hormone imbalances, hypoglycemic reactions when you do not eat, increased inflammation, decreased ability to deal with stress, hypothyroidism, etc.

    The biggest give-a-way to hypothyroidism is an abnormally low body temperature. This is best checked by doing basal body temperature first thing in the morning for at least a week and using the readings to get an average. Other possible symptoms include dry hair and skin, hair falling out, low energy, mental fogginess, low pulse rate, weight gain, insomnia, etc.

    The best way to raise the blood pressure will depend on the cause of the low blood pressure to begin with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I just realized that I do have a recommendation for raising blood pressure - licorice! Not the fake candy licorice-flavored crap (which is actually anise flavored but called licorice) but actual 100% licorice. You could buy licorice root and boil it to make a strong tea, or you could order 100% licorice (it's hard, shiny, black, but tastes nothing like what we in America have come to think it is) online.

    I've been in Italy the past month, where unsweetened 100% licorice candies are easy to find (I've never seen these in the U.S.) I've been consuming them every day for the past 3 weeks, and today I check my BP and it was 116/83! I think my BP has never been this high in my life, it's really amazing.


    Liquorice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Licorice root is an adaptogenic herb that works by supporting adrenal function.

    If taken is extremely high doses for more than 6 months can lead to hypertension, but this would be due to the steroidal component of the licorice root causing potassium depletion and sodium retention.

    Most licorice candy as you pointed out does not takes like licorice root or real licorice candy. That is because the flavoring for most of the black licorice candy we are familiar with is star anise or plain old anise oil, not licorice root.

    Natural vitamin C sources, pantothenic acid and other adaptogens can also normalize blood pressure by strengthening the adrenals. Some of my other favorites other than licorice root include schisandra berry, astragalus, suma and Siberian ginseng (eleuthero).

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    I haven't read all the responses so my apologies if I'm repeating something already discussed. Have you heard about or looked into Low-Dose Naltrexone? It is being used to treat auto-immune disorders with much success all over the world.

    This site has lots of useful information and links.

    I hope that you find something that works, things really do sound awful for your family.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    IBS is not from MS.
    I agree. Unfortunately, since it's a common issue for many MS patients, and also because doctors know so little about IBS in general, they routinely tell folks with MS that their IBS is probably caused by their MS. I've personally had more doctors than I can count tell me this. And I proved them wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post

    MS is an autoimmune disorder involving a viral infection and weak adrenal glands. The virus implicated in MS is human herpes virus type 6. The poor adrenal function leads to the over production of low affinity (nonspecific) antibodies seen in autoimmune disorders.
    I don't want to argue about MS here, but that is only one of many competing theories about the cause. In fact, one of the most credible theories (among several others) in my opinion is the Hygiene Hypothesis.

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post

    Thyroid tests are notorious for missing cases of hypothyroidism for several reasons. Doing basal body temperature for at least a week is a lot more accurate in determining hypothyroidism than lab tests. An average body temperature below 97.6 along with symptoms of hypothyroidism indicate hypothyroidism regardless of what the lab tests say.
    I've read this, too. When I've tested my basal tempf irst thing in the morning on the first 3 days of my cycle, it was consistently between 96.9 - 97.3 but since my bloodwork always looks perfect, no doctor would ever treat for hypothyroid. Very frustrating!


    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    Autoimmune conditions do not cause poor quality sleep in most cases. But lack of sleep does not cause autoimmunity either, although it can aggravate autoimmune disorders.
    There is so little known about both sleep and autoimmune issue, so I don't think anyone can make this kind of statement with certainty, but I have read some very compelling articles showing a correlation between the two.

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post

    The Fiber Menace is so full of contradictions and misinformation
    As someone with 6+ years of intermittent excruciating IBS, I healed myself with the help of Fiber Menace. I don't give a rat's ass what anyone says about it, it was the one thing that worked when nothing else did (including accupuncturists, herbalists, and naturopathic doctors, who all gave me probiotics as well.)


    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post

    The key to successfully treating MS is to destroy the triggering virus and restore proper adrenal function first. The regeneration of myelin can then be addressed with supplements such as lecithin, EPA/DHA and B12 as methylcobalamin.
    Since there is no consensus for the cause of MS (and likely, there could be multiple causes), I don't know that there is one specific way to treat it that will work for everyone. Perhaps for some people, this strategy would work, but what I've been doing has so far been working very well for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post

    The getting dizzy upon standing is known as orthostatic hypotension. This is a symptom of adrenal dysfunction, which again also plays a major role in the MS.
    I never had OH issues until I developped low BP as a result of eating low carb. Now that I've reintroduced tham back to my diet, I'm doing significantly better. Perhaps there are other factors besides adrenal dysfunction that can cause this symptom? (unless maybe low carb in some way reduces the efficiency of the adrenals)
    Last edited by BestBetter; 09-08-2012 at 03:34 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I don't want to argue about MS here, but that is only one of many competing theories about the cause. In fact, one of the most credible theories (among several others) in my opinion is the Hygiene Hypothesis.
    I have no idea what the "hygiene hypothesis" is. But microbes have been found to be the triggers for the majority of autoimmune disorders. Type 1 diabetes has been linked to several viruses. Rheumatoid arthritis to a chlamydia bacteria and mycoplasmas. Several viruses have been implicated in Paget's disease. Viruses have also been implicated in lupus, ALS, etc.

    Virus-induced autoimmunity: potential role of ... [Viral Immunol. 2001] - PubMed - NCBI

    The viruses can present as antigens mimicking healthy tissues. But the viruses, or bacterium, cannot cause the autoimmune conditions on their own. The adrenals have a regulatory effect on the immune system including the sensitivity of antibodies. If the adrenals are working properly the primary antibodies produced are high affinity (specific). If the adrenals are weakened though the primary antibodies produced are of a low affinity (nonspecific) form. If you want to look in to the difference more research the process of separating low affinity antibodies from high affinity antibodies in the process of making monoclonal antibodies. Anyway, it is the lack of specificity that allows the low affinity antibodies targeting the microbe to inadvertently tag healthy tissues for destruction by the white blood cells. The reason these autoimmune conditions are specific to certain tissues is because the triggering microbes the immune system is trying to target is specific to certain tissues.


    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I've read this, too. When I've tested my basal tempf irst thing in the morning on the first 3 days of my cycle, it was consistently between 96.9 - 97.3 but since my bloodwork always looks perfect, no doctor would ever treat for hypothyroid. Very frustrating!

    Readings need to be taken for at least a week. With women some people even recommend 2 weeks worth of readings.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    There is so little known about both sleep and autoimmune issue, so I don't think anyone can make this kind of statement with certainty, but I have read some very compelling articles showing a correlation between the two.
    Yes, there is a correlation as I also mentioned. But correlation does not mean cause. Many people that have erratic schedules or do not get enough sleep don't get autoimmune disorders. If they develop an autoimmune disorder though then the lack of sleep can aggravate the condition by weakening the adrenals. Especially if they then try to rely on stimulants to keep awake, which weaken the adrenals even further. But there still has to be a trigger. For example, a lack of sleep can make a person more prone to catching a cold because the lack of sleep runs down the immune system. But they still need to be infected with the cold virus to actually get a real cold.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    As someone with 6+ years of intermittent excruciating IBS, I healed myself with the help of Fiber Menace. I don't give a rat's ass what anyone says about it, it was the one thing that worked when nothing else did (including accupuncturists, herbalists, and naturopathic doctors, who all gave me probiotics as well.)
    Fine, that is your choice. But that was not a private message to you. These are public forums and there are other people reading the information that may actually "give a rat's ass" as to the misinformation the book presents.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    Since there is no consensus for the cause of MS (and likely, there could be multiple causes), I don't know that there is one specific way to treat it that will work for everyone. Perhaps for some people, this strategy would work, but what I've been doing has so far been working very well for me.
    Again the evidence to a viral infection is overwhelming. And no, the same thing is not going to work for everyone. For example, not everyone can take the same adaptogens because they may be allergic to certain adaptogens. Or maybe they refuse to give up their coffee or cigarettes. That is what happened with one friend of mine. She did not get rid of her MS with the supplements until she decided to finally give up the cigarettes to allow her adrenals to strengthen. But again, you can choose to go whatever way you want to go. As I pointed out earlier though this was not a private message. It is a public message so those who choose to read and look in to the information presented can do so.

    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I never had OH issues until I developped low BP as a result of eating low carb. Now that I've reintroduced tham back to my diet, I'm doing significantly better. Perhaps there are other factors besides adrenal dysfunction that can cause this symptom? (unless maybe low carb in some way reduces the efficiency of the adrenals)
    There are only three ways carbs can increase blood pressure. 1. You have an allergic reaction to the carbs, which will cause a release of epinephrine raising the blood pressure. 2. You are an early stage type 2 diabetic. In this case your pancreas would over release insulin, which in high levels constricts the blood vessels raising the blood pressure. Both of these are very transient though making them more unlikely. But you are not going to like hearing number 3 since it involves yet another benefit of fiber. 3. Your increased intake of carbs also meant an increase of fiber intake. This in turn feeds the intestinal flora, which as I mentioned earlier produce 80% of the body's serotonin. This serotonin is separate from the serotonin produced by the brain. There are about 18 different serotonin receptors in the body serving different functions. Among the various functions of intestinal serotonin are regulation of intestinal peristalsis, which is why fibers help IBS, and constriction of blood vessels to help maintain blood pressure.

    Or it may have not been the carbs at all. It could have been as simple as the carb sources you were consuming contained high levels of nutrients that are supporting the adrenals and/or thyroid. This would have also helped with the MS since again adrenal dysfunction is a major component of autoimmune disorders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuBee View Post
    eliminating added sugars and grains (basic primal stuff), but also eliminating eggs, nightshades, dairy, nuts and seeds for 90 days.
    I would DIE.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I don't want to argue about MS here, but that is only one of many competing theories about the cause. In fact, one of the most credible theories (among several others) in my opinion is the Hygiene Hypothesis.
    I agree. And if you dont know what it is (seems some don't).....a little googling will get you here The hygiene hypothesis and multiple sclerosis - Fleming - 2007 - Annals of Neurology - Wiley Online Library for a start. Anyone who tells you they absolutely know for certain THE ONE cause is likely FOS. Thats why scientist doing the studies say things like "are implicated" or "could produce" or "is a model for review".
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 09-09-2012 at 11:53 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    I agree. And if you dont know what it is (seems some don't).....a little googling will get you here The hygiene hypothesis and multiple sclerosis - Fleming - 2007 - Annals of Neurology - Wiley Online Library for a start. Anyone who tells you they absolutely know for certain THE ONE cause is likely FOS. Thats why scientist doing the studies say things like "are implicated" or "could produce" or "is a model for review".
    Apparently you do not know what a hypothesis is either. A hypothesis is nothing more than an educated GUESS, not backed by any real evidence.

    When they come up with actual evidence to back the hypothesis then they have a theory. Evidence such as these:

    J Clin Virol. 2000 May;16(3):179-91.
    Frequent HHV-6 reactivation in multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients.
    Ablashi DV, Eastman HB, Owen CB, Roman MM, Friedman J, Zabriskie JB, Peterson DL, Pearson GR, Whitman JE.
    Source

    Department of Microbiology, Georgetown University, School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. dablashi@abionline.com
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:

    HHV-6 is a ubiquitous virus and its infection usually occurs in childhood and then becomes a latent infection. HHV-6 reactivation has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of AIDS and several other diseases.
    OBJECTIVES:

    To determine what role HHV-6 infection or reactivation plays in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
    RESULTS:

    Twenty-one MS and 35 CFS patients were studied and followed clinically. In these patients, we measured HHV-6 IgG and IgM antibody levels and also analyzed their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for the presence of HHV-6, using a short term culture assay. In both MS and CFS patients, we found higher levels of HHV-6 IgM antibody and elevated levels of IgG antibody when compared to healthy controls. Seventy percent of the MS patients studied contained IgM antibodies for HHV-6 late antigens (capsid), while only 15% of the healthy donors (HD) and 20% of the patients with other neurological disorders (OND) had HHV-6 IgM antibodies. Higher frequency of IgM antibody was also detected in CFS patients (57.1%) compared to HD (16%). Moreover, 54% of CFS patients exhibited antibody to HHV-6 early protein (p41/38) compared to only 8.0% of the HD. Elevated IgG antibody titers were detected in both the MS and the CFS patients. PBMCs from MS, CFS and HD were analyzed in a short term culture assay in order to detect HHV-6 antigen expressing cells and to characterize the viral isolates obtained as either Variant A or B. Fifty-four percent of MS patients contained HHV-6 early and late antigen producing cells and 87% of HHV-6 isolates were Variant B. Isolates from CFS, patients were predominately Variant A (70%) and isolates from HD were predominately Variant B (67%). Moreover, one isolate from OND was also Variant B. Persistent HHV-6 infection was found in two CFS patients over a period of 2.5 years and HHV-6 specific cellular immune responses were detected in PBMCs from ten CFS patients.
    CONCLUSION:

    In both MS and CFS patients, we found increased levels of HHV-6 antibody and HHV-6 DNA. A decrease in cellular immune responses was also detected in CFS patients. These data suggest that HHV-6 reactivation plays a role in the pathogenesis of these disorders.


    Nat Med. 1997 Dec;3(12):1394-7.
    Association of human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) with multiple sclerosis: increased IgM response to HHV-6 early antigen and detection of serum HHV-6 DNA.
    Soldan SS, Berti R, Salem N, Secchiero P, Flamand L, Calabresi PA, Brennan MB, Maloni HW, McFarland HF, Lin HC, Patnaik M, Jacobson S.
    Source

    Viral Immunology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Abstract

    Viruses have long been suggested to be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). This suggestion is based on (1) epidemiological evidence of childhood exposure to infectious agents and increase in disease exacerbations with viral infection; (2) geographic association of disease susceptibility with evidence of MS clustering; (3) evidence that migration to and from high-risk areas influences the likelihood of developing MS; (4) abnormal immune responses to a variety of viruses; and (5) analogy with animal models and other human diseases in which viruses can cause diseases with long incubation periods, a relapsing-remitting course, and demyelination. Many of these studies involve the demonstration of increased antibody titers to a particular virus, whereas some describe isolation of virus from MS material. However, no virus to date has been definitively associated with this disease. Recently, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), a newly described beta-herpes virus that shares homology with cytomegalovirus (CMV), has been reported to be present in active MS plaques. In order to extend these observations, we have demonstrated increased IgM serum antibody responses to HHV-6 early antigen (p41/38) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), compared with patients with chronic progressive MS (CPMS), patients with other neurologic disease (OND), patients with other autoimmune disease (OID), and normal controls. Given the ubiquitous nature of this virus and the challenging precedent of correlating antiviral antibodies with disease association, these antibody studies have been supported by the detection of HHV-6 DNA from samples of MS serum as a marker of active viral infection.


    J Neurovirol. 2007 Aug;13(4):347-52.
    Evidence for human herpesvirus 6 variant A antibodies in multiple sclerosis: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.
    Virtanen JO, Färkkilä M, Multanen J, Uotila L, Jääskeläinen AJ, Vaheri A, Koskiniemi M.
    Source

    Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Abstract

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has been linked to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). HHV-6 antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 27 patients with clinically definite MS (CDMS) were compared with age- and sex-matched controls, including various other neurological diseases and symptoms (OND). In addition, we studied a series of 19 patients with clinically or laboratory supported possible MS (CPMS). Seroprevalence to HHV-6A was 100% in patients with MS, both in CDMS and CPMS, compared to 69.2% in patients with OND (P = .001 and .007). The mean immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were significantly higher in patients with CDMS and CPMS than in controls (P = .005 and .00002). The proportion of acute primary infections without CSF involvement was similar in all groups; however, primary infections with intrathecal HHV-6 antibody production were more frequent in MS. In CSF, HHV-6A-specific antibodies were present in three (11.5%) and four (21.1%) patients with CDMS and CPMS, compared to none with OND (P = .06 and .01, respectively). Serological suggestions to HHV-6A infection occurred more often in both CDMS and CPMS than in OND (14.8% versus 21.1% versus 3.8%). We conclude that a subpopulation of MS patients, and even a greater proportion of possible MS subjects, has serological evidence of HHV-6A infection, which might provide new markers for diagnosis and therapy.


    J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2011 Aug;44(4):247-51. Epub 2011 Jan 20.
    Human herpesvirus-6 viral load and antibody titer in serum samples of patients with multiple sclerosis.
    Behzad-Behbahani A, Mikaeili MH, Entezam M, Mojiri A, Pour GY, Arasteh MM, Rahsaz M, Banihashemi M, Khadang B, Moaddeb A, Nematollahi Z, Azarpira N.
    Source

    Medical Technology Research Center, Faculty of Para-Clinical Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Behbahani_2000@yahoo.com
    Abstract
    BACKGROUND:

    Despite the number of cases with definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) being on increase, the role of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) infection as a trigger for MS disease still is deliberated. Based on antibody detection and quantitative HHV-6 polymerase chain reaction assay, this study was achieved to find out the possible association between infection with HHV-6 and clinical progression of MS disease.
    METHODS:

    A total of 108 serum samples were obtained from 30 MS patients followed prospectively for a 6-month period. These samples were analyzed for the presence of HHV-6 DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and for anti-HHV-6 IgG titer. Activation of the disease was determined by either magnetic resonance imaging or by clinical status of the patients. Control groups were also included.
    RESULTS:

    The average antibody index for the MS patients in the first sample collection was higher than both control groups (p = 0.001). HHV-6 DNA was detected in the serum samples of 10 of 30 MS patients. The mean HHV-6 viral load in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with and without relapse was 973 and 714, respectively. Seven patients showed an exacerbation during the study period. Of those, four patients had HHV-6 DNA in their collected samples. The prevalence of HHV-6 DNA was significantly higher in patients with MS as compared with control groups (p = 0.001).
    CONCLUSIONS:

    The results indicate that HHV-6 is implicated somehow in MS disease. Over time, rising HHV-6 IgG antibody titers together with an exacerbation and detection of HHV-6 DNA in serum samples of some MS patients suggests possible association between the reactivation of the virus and disease progression.


    This is why they are not finding cures for these diseases. People are preferring to stick to their hypotheses rather than rely on real evidence to causes of diseases.

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