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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    Home economics

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    I didn't really cook before Primal. I cook a lot better now. In the process, I feel like I've become some kind of home-ec queen of sorts, or at least I do a little more toward that every day. For example:

    - Make bone broth or anything that will result in a layer of fat in the fridge. Skim off fat and save for cooking.
    - Make bone broth and save the bits of meat to make other things. Examples: the bits of meat on pig's tails and feet, the bits on soup bones--makes great burrito meat.
    - Cook whole chickens so I can have ready-to-use leftovers. We only ever have the legs and wings when the bird is right out of the oven anymore.
    - I tend now to scan what we have for odds and ends to go with dinner. Example: some garden tomatoes were getting a little iffy, no good fresh anymore, so I cut them in half and baked them with olive oil, pesto and cheese and that was our vegetable side with dinner.
    - I save the olive oil that comes with the sundried tomatoes and use it for salads. I'm now wondering what you can do with the juice that comes with olives or jalapenos.

    I'd be interested in other ideas you might have. Have you become more like a Depression-era saver and user, a home-economics person? Got any ideas to share? I'd even like to hear some cleaning ideas even though I don't do a lot of cleaning (I'm a slob in that department.)
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    I cook a beer can chicken and strip off all the meat for a meals(s) I take the bones, drippings, a can of tomato/fresh, throw in some vegetables for a soup and cook on low....yummy! I find myself gnawing on the bones.

    Is that healthy?

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    The meat from broth is also really good for hash (chopped onion, garlic, random veggies, carrots all cooked in a cast-iron skillet then topped with a couple eggs).

    I too skim the fat from my beef broth. I 've found that this fat is "softer" than pure rendered tallow because it contains more water I guess. I might try heating this latest batch to boil off all the water since I got A LOT (like 2 cups) of fat skimmed off. I think it would keep much better if it was "purified", but I could be wrong.

    Olive and caper juice are good mixed into vinaigrettes. I bet one made with sun-dried tomato oil and caper juice would be awesome.

    One thing I do to minimize waste is to grind meat scraps from when I trim beef heart. I find that trimming off the fascia and valves from beef heart greatly increases the palatability, but I hate to waste all the trim, so I grind it all up. Makes great ground beef.

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    Leida's Avatar
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    I just put meat from broth into the soup that broth maketh.

    - I save the olive oil that comes with the sundried tomatoes and use it for salads. I'm now wondering what you can do with the juice that comes with olives or jalapenos.
    Liquid in gazpachos. Why use water when you can have that? In Russia, juice from pickled cucumbers is the #1 remedy for hangovers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrodieMN View Post
    I find myself gnawing on the bones.

    Is that healthy?
    I've heard some people eat some of the bones. I ate some bones once and thought I might be doing something I shouldn't. Wish I'd known.

    Quote Originally Posted by yodiewan View Post
    The meat from broth is also really good for hash (chopped onion, garlic, random veggies, carrots all cooked in a cast-iron skillet then topped with a couple eggs).

    I too skim the fat from my beef broth. I 've found that this fat is "softer" than pure rendered tallow because it contains more water I guess. I might try heating this latest batch to boil off all the water since I got A LOT (like 2 cups) of fat skimmed off. I think it would keep much better if it was "purified", but I could be wrong.

    Olive and caper juice are good mixed into vinaigrettes. I bet one made with sun-dried tomato oil and caper juice would be awesome.

    One thing I do to minimize waste is to grind meat scraps from when I trim beef heart. I find that trimming off the fascia and valves from beef heart greatly increases the palatability, but I hate to waste all the trim, so I grind it all up. Makes great ground beef.
    Wow, great ideas! I felt so sad throwing out all that heart trim. What do you use for grinding meat? My mom used to have a meat grinder that bolted to the counter and had a hand crank. Do you use something like that?

    Quote Originally Posted by Leida View Post
    Liquid in gazpachos. Why use water when you can have that?.
    I really need to try making gazpacho.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 180 x 2. Current Deadlift: 230 x 2

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    My frugal "waste not, want not" thing is when I'm peeling or chopping veggies, I save the scraps that would normally go into the garbage (onion skins, carrot peels, the hard fibrous center spine of kale, etc...) in a ziploc baggie in the freezer. When the baggie gets full, I boil everything in a big pot on the stove and end up with a ton of veggie broth.

    I usually freeze the veggie broth in small containers and use it later in soups or to cook rice in, or even to add to meat to make a nice sauce.

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    Just last night I made a pesto-like sauce out of a bunch of arugula I forgot about. They were wilted and a bit rubbery, but just blending the whole bunch up with olive oil, coconut milk, garlic, and salt made it into a really yummy sauce!
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Wow, great ideas! I felt so sad throwing out all that heart trim. What do you use for grinding meat? My mom used to have a meat grinder that bolted to the counter and had a hand crank. Do you use something like that?
    Thanks!

    I use the grinder attachment for my KitchenAid stand mixer. It works well and is fairly easy to clean. I did recently inherit a hand crank grinder but I have not tried it out to see how it compares to the KitchenAid. I owe my grinding success to Kenji at SeriousEats.com. He writes wonderful articles for that website and has written extensively on hamburgers. Here is the post about grinding your own beef:
    Equipment: How to Buy, Use, and Care for a Meat Grinder | Serious Eats

    The key is to freeze the grinder (for a long time) and the meat (for a few minutes).

    He also has another article where he compares various grinding methods (pre-ground at the store, food processor, grinder, and hand-chopped with a knife) and the hand-chopped won, so technically you can do it by hand, but it would take a looong time.

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    I just found this: 15 Ways to Use Leftover Pickle Juice: BA Daily: bonappetit.com

    More uses for pickle juice!

  10. #10
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    Since I'm making more of my own sauces and such these days I keep saving containers that other things came in thinking, I might use that to put pesto in. Also I use the containers to make a batch of something such as guacamole that is always handy.

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