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Thread: Gym member, what are the best machines to use for Primal workout

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  1. #1
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    Question Gym member, what are the best machines to use for Primal workout

    I know we don't need to hit the gym and body weight is good enough, but I have a membership seeking words of wisdom to which machines would fit Primal Fitness best. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    Free weights are the best. Machines allow you to train specific muscles in specific ranges of motion. That is not functional. IN other words in life those are not the movements you need to be fit and strong. Squats, deadlifts, bench press are all functional movements. Your body has to balance and lift all at the same time. Just like real life. ANy good gym should have someone who can show you how to use the wieghts properly. I would highly recommend a personal trainer for a time until you feel comfortable. It was the best money I ever spent. I'd still be with her if I hadn't moved.

  3. #3
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    Thanks snoops, they have a pull up machine as well and a personal trainer is free with my membership, so i'll definately get with one of them.

  4. #4
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    Also, I have read several people saying that body weight is good enough. I don't get that. Doesn't Mark advocate lifting heavy things? I would not be anywhere near as strong as I am now if I had only been doing body weight squats. You have to stress a muscle for it to grow. And then it adapts and you have to do it again. No?

  5. #5
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    I too am much stronger now from adding weights to my body weight routines, however if you are just getting started and have not been active then body weight only workouts maybe enough and all they can handle. Better to start with that than see those injuries by jumping quickly into the weighted workouts.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoops View Post
    Also, I have read several people saying that body weight is good enough. I don't get that. Doesn't Mark advocate lifting heavy things? I would not be anywhere near as strong as I am now if I had only been doing body weight squats. You have to stress a muscle for it to grow. And then it adapts and you have to do it again. No?
    Have you tried pistol squats? Lifting the majority of your bodyweight with one leg is pretty decent- I would guess about a 1.5x squat weight, which is a pretty decent place for most people. I'm about 150 pounds. A one-arm pushup for me is about 110-120 pounds. That's a 200 pound bench, give or take a bit, plus I've never found anything yet to work my obliques quite as much as a one-arm pushup. Those numbers aren't impressive, but they aren't shabby either, and better than average.

    Get yourself some Al Kavadlo, or Convict Conditioning. Check out "Building the Gymnastic Body" and see the feats of strength that gymnasts are expected to do that aren't even considered competition moves- controlled muscle-ups, L-sits, handstands (on rings, no less)- and those are the basic skills.

    Bodyweight is more of a skill, but I feel it is more useful. Iron builds strength much faster, though, and in a more obvious progression. The goal is to become more fit, and bodyweight is definitely an option for pretty much everyone.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    Have you tried pistol squats? Lifting the majority of your bodyweight with one leg is pretty decent- I would guess about a 1.5x squat weight, which is a pretty decent place for most people. I'm about 150 pounds. A one-arm pushup for me is about 110-120 pounds. That's a 200 pound bench, give or take a bit, plus I've never found anything yet to work my obliques quite as much as a one-arm pushup. Those numbers aren't impressive, but they aren't shabby either, and better than average.

    Get yourself some Al Kavadlo, or Convict Conditioning. Check out "Building the Gymnastic Body" and see the feats of strength that gymnasts are expected to do that aren't even considered competition moves- controlled muscle-ups, L-sits, handstands (on rings, no less)- and those are the basic skills.

    Bodyweight is more of a skill, but I feel it is more useful. Iron builds strength much faster, though, and in a more obvious progression. The goal is to become more fit, and bodyweight is definitely an option for pretty much everyone.
    Pistol Squat? Really that is really hard to do. How many people do you think on here can do this properly? Not only you need some serious flexibility for this to bring your leg up and plus control your balance while descending.

    I think body weight exercises are great when you can't get to a gym or you have some kind of injury. However overtime your body becomes skilled at the same thing hence this is where adding resistance in the form of lifting heavy comes into play. Of course heavy varies from one person to another.

    I'm curious about this book you are referring to. I will have to read it at some point. I get it gymnasts have awesome bodies but these people have been training since they were children. Keep in mind that most of these athletes have the genetics to become what they are today. Training is their life but for the rest of us we have to train only with an athlete's mentality to change our body composition.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cayla29s View Post
    Pistol Squat? Really that is really hard to do. How many people do you think on here can do this properly? Not only you need some serious flexibility for this to bring your leg up and plus control your balance while descending.
    Obviously he wasn't saying you should just jump straight to pistols. There are many ways of regressing and working your way up. The point was that your own body is adequately heavy to a great extent. You can make it pretty damn hard and get ridiculously strong before you really have to add weight.
    Josh Vernier, CPT

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cayla29s View Post
    Pistol Squat? Really that is really hard to do. How many people do you think on here can do this properly? Not only you need some serious flexibility for this to bring your leg up and plus control your balance while descending.

    I think body weight exercises are great when you can't get to a gym or you have some kind of injury. However overtime your body becomes skilled at the same thing hence this is where adding resistance in the form of lifting heavy comes into play. Of course heavy varies from one person to another.

    I'm curious about this book you are referring to. I will have to read it at some point. I get it gymnasts have awesome bodies but these people have been training since they were children. Keep in mind that most of these athletes have the genetics to become what they are today. Training is their life but for the rest of us we have to train only with an athlete's mentality to change our body composition.
    1. Yes. Yes. A fair number. Yes. I've been working on it for over a year, via the Convict Conditioning progressions, and only recently been able to do them consistently. Building the Gymnastic Body is actually too advanced for me, I think (I haven't read it, but the website seems pretty intense) but I'm looking forward to one-arm pullups, and bending over backwards into a bridge with CC (those are the two exercises I'm struggling with the most at the moment).

    I started with bodyweight squats with my hands on a table. I moved on to half squats, full squats, close squats, uneven squats, then back down to half uneven squats, then finally to half pistol, full pistol with a counterbalance weight, and now full pistol squats. These progressions exist for all kinds of different bodyweight exercises.

    2. Yes, but by changing the leverage, or reducing to single-limb exercises, you can become amazingly strong. Jack LaLanne's famous fingertip pushups with straight arms are pretty amazing- I've never met anyone who could do that, but lots of people can do regular pushups. There are always ways to make a particular exercise harder. Adding weight is just one of those ways.

    3. I really recommend Convict Conditioning, as I have had a great deal of success with it personally. I don't think it's the perfect exercise book, but the steps are reasonable and the goals achievable for me, I think. Building Gymnastic Bodies seems to be something to try when I'm done with CC.

    In addition, my knee problems that started 7 years ago when I broke my kneecap are all gone, my legs have mostly balanced out again, and I'm faster than I have been in years. The bridging and pullups have mostly fixed some posture issues that I had. Bodyweight workouts have more benefits than just getting stronger.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfreaksho View Post
    1. Yes. Yes. A fair number. Yes. I've been working on it for over a year, via the Convict Conditioning progressions, and only recently been able to do them consistently. Building the Gymnastic Body is actually too advanced for me, I think (I haven't read it, but the website seems pretty intense) but I'm looking forward to one-arm pullups, and bending over backwards into a bridge with CC (those are the two exercises I'm struggling with the most at the moment).

    I started with bodyweight squats with my hands on a table. I moved on to half squats, full squats, close squats, uneven squats, then back down to half uneven squats, then finally to half pistol, full pistol with a counterbalance weight, and now full pistol squats. These progressions exist for all kinds of different bodyweight exercises.

    2. Yes, but by changing the leverage, or reducing to single-limb exercises, you can become amazingly strong. Jack LaLanne's famous fingertip pushups with straight arms are pretty amazing- I've never met anyone who could do that, but lots of people can do regular pushups. There are always ways to make a particular exercise harder. Adding weight is just one of those ways.

    3. I really recommend Convict Conditioning, as I have had a great deal of success with it personally. I don't think it's the perfect exercise book, but the steps are reasonable and the goals achievable for me, I think. Building Gymnastic Bodies seems to be something to try when I'm done with CC.

    In addition, my knee problems that started 7 years ago when I broke my kneecap are all gone, my legs have mostly balanced out again, and I'm faster than I have been in years. The bridging and pullups have mostly fixed some posture issues that I had. Bodyweight workouts have more benefits than just getting stronger.
    Yes I know that there are progressions to pistol squats, I just thought that the original post suggested that one should try the full on pistol squat right away. My mistake for assuming that.

    I have been lifting for 8 yrs and I have definitely gotten so much stronger and perfected my form. There are definitely exercise I would love to be able to do without assistance ie. pull ups. Any suggestions on progressions? My upper body strength has gotten pretty good but I would say that my legs are much stronger.

    Would you reccomend CC for women?

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