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    YogaBare's Avatar
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    Fish - smoked versus canned?

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    Hey everyone,

    Does anyone know how the preparation of fish affects the nutritional composition? I went through a phase of eating a lot of smoked mackerel and trout, but wasn't getting much energy from it. As soon as I switched the canned salmon, I noticed a big difference.

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    Nigel's Avatar
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    I think you'll find smoking fish introduces carcinogens. But OTOH isn't smoked haddock or salmon just the poodle's parts?
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    RichMahogany's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel View Post
    I think you'll find smoking fish introduces carcinogens. But OTOH isn't smoked haddock or salmon just the poodle's parts?
    I am so putting "The Poodle's Parts" on my own personal list of favorite British vernacular.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel View Post
    isn't smoked haddock or salmon just the poodle's parts?
    Explain yourself sir!

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YogaBare View Post
    Hey everyone,

    Does anyone know how the preparation of fish affects the nutritional composition? I went through a phase of eating a lot of smoked mackerel and trout, but wasn't getting much energy from it. As soon as I switched the canned salmon, I noticed a big difference.
    Negligible effect, I'd have thought. I guess hot-smoked or cooked fish would have less nutritional value than raw fish (or fish that's smoked but not long enough or hot enough to cook it) in that some nutrients will be heat-labile. Canned salmon is cooked in the can, of course.

    I'd think this is coincidence. But you can try at a kind of cross-check, by swapping out the canned salmon for smoked salmon. That gives you some kind of stab at seeing whether the fact of the smoking or the type of fish might be involved. There are so many variables, though -- and food is only one of them.

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    My guess, not the best, but in the smoking you probably lose a lot of the fish's healthy fats. Smoke fish tends to be dry... That would be my best guess. But I do agree, it is the Poodle Parts.
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    One thing I can't understand is why all the smoked salmon seems to be farmed, and all the canned stuff is wild.

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