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Thread: Wolves Threaten Rocquefort Cheese page

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    Wolves Threaten Rocquefort Cheese

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    Sacre bleu!

    Seen this summer for the first time since the 1920s in the southern appellation, the elusive and protected predator has fanned out from the Italian and southeastern French Alps and is now carrying out attacks in the Cevennes mountains of Lozčre in the southern Auvergne, the home of Roquefort cheese.

    Roquefort farmers warn the future of the cheese could now be in jeopardy as they will no longer be able to respect the appellation's strict rules on allowing their sheep to graze freely. These stipulate that it is "compulsory" for sheep to roam on the hilly pastures "every day" provided there is sufficient grass, "weather conditions permitting".

    There have been 30 recent attacks, with 62 ruminants killed and 73 injured. ...
    Roquefort under threat from the return of the wolf - Telegraph


    Don't go messing with bears either:

    Hiker's camera offers clues to bear attack: Bear Attacks | Alaska news at adn.com

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    bloodorchid's Avatar
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    apparently all the farmers have to do is a get a recording of a wolf pack howling. it worked like a charm in a documentary i saw

    also, The More You Know, bears have little to no interest in menstrual blood
    beautiful
    yeah you are

    I mean there's so many ants in my eyes! And there are so many TVs, microwaves, radios... I think, I can't, I'm not 100% sure what we have here in stock.. I don't know because I can't see anything! Our prices, I hope, aren't too low!

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    My brother-in-law has sheep in northern Wisconsin, to make cheese from the milk. He hasn't had any issues with wolves, but he keeps a handful of large dogs that live in the field with the sheep and keep the wolves out. Those dogs are pretty cool animals, actually, but definitely not pets.

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    Poor wolves. Very misunderstood creatures. Let 'em have a few sheep, I say.
    Time for the farmers to hire some shepherds.

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    anatolian shepherds. they are used all over the world to protect livestock from wolves and jackals and even used in namibia to protect livestock from cheetahs.

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    Is the Gorgonzola safe, at least?

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    There have been 30 recent attacks, with 62 ruminants killed and 73 injured. ...
    and the next line is that only a few are verifiable wolf attacks. PLUS the gubbmint is paying farmers for lost sheep.

    jeebus, guys, get some damn dogs.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

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    Quote Originally Posted by noodletoy View Post
    and the next line is that only a few are verifiable wolf attacks. PLUS the gubbmint is paying farmers for lost sheep.

    jeebus, guys, get some damn dogs.
    Of course the government would pay for lost sheep - France works very, very differently than the USA. Roquefort is like Champagne. To carry the Roquefort name, the cheese must come from specific sheep fed specific grass from a certain locale and then aged a certain way. The government protection keeps the market for it fairly stable - only a certain amount of sheep can fit in the area, otherwise there will be no grass. This keeps the amount of farmers producing Roquefort stable, as it's limited to a finite area. This keeps the price fairly stable as well, except for fluctuations based on demand. No sheep farmers in the area will grow rich, but neither will they ever lose their jobs, barring outside influence from things like wolves, high drought affecting the grass production. Which is why the government would step in, since it basically authorizes their cheese, just as Champagne is authorized.

    No value judgments from me on whether this is good or not - I hate political debate. But the situation is a bit more complex than the telegraph's article conveys. The only reason I know about it is that I read a book comparing North America to France and they had a large section covering the French government's treatment of Roquefort cheese.

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    lexie's Avatar
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    Double post....nothing to see here.
    Last edited by lexie; 08-28-2012 at 08:41 AM.

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    PrimalCon New York
    as a sommelier and somebody who has worked in fine-dining with quite a few french chefs i'm well-versed in french agricultural policies. the regulations and standards set often allow for a level of food or wine that will never happen in mass-market-think-cheap-fast-big america. i respect that.

    that being said, just like ranchers in the american west who essentially destroyed the wolf population, after demolishing its habitat and killing off all its natural prey, many of the attacks could be from dogs, foxes and other predators. i doubt at this point the wolf population is sufficiently significant for the ensuing hysteria.

    http://www.kora.ch/malme/05_library/...t_dommages.pdf

    From 1994 to 1995, 129 wolf attacks have been recorded. The intensity of damages is higher on flocks where protection systems are lacking. Livestock guarding dogs lowered these damages.
    like i said, get some damn dogs.

    but hey c'est la vie and all that.

    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    – Ernest Hemingway

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