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    Betorq's Avatar
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    Food Tourism Stories & Aspirations

    Quote Originally Posted by Owly View Post
    Our most recent major overseas trip was to India in 2010, and I think I was saved by all the walking, both with my backpack when we were travelling and then walking through archaeological sites and other historic stuff. Oh, and some hiking in the western Himalaya region.

    Last year, my international trips were to Tulum and Merida (Mexico) and NYC. In Mexico I spent so much time in the water and exploring Mayan ruins that I burned off pretty much everything I ate, and then in NY I wasn't really doing the food tourist thing since the foods I think of as classically New York are off-limits for a celiac, although my friend I visited in NJ took me to a classic NJ Italian restaurant that served gluten-free options.

    I think we need a food tourism thread!
    Well I don't know why it took me this long to respond, but here tis...
    Someone jump aboard & I'll add some food-travelogue too...
    "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
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    My favorite food tourism country is Spain. I could live on pata negra, Spanish olives and cafe con leche.

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    On my first trip to Africa, to the southernmost 5 countries, I had a lot of wonderful game meats since I visited several game parks where they allow hunting in order to cull the herds. I had impala, springbok, eland, oryx, cape buffalo, warthog, oh, and deep fried caterpillars are yummy too.

    My second trip to Africa was centered around Mt Kilimangaro. I swear I have never felt so alive, energized and vibrant as i did eating the food from that area. I think there is something about that volcanic soil plus fresh glacier melt water. The produce there just tastes like the vitamins are bursting out of it. They also have some amazing honey there. It's really dark like blackstrap molasses. Such an intense flavor of the flowers but not really very sweet.

    I had some great food when I was in China, Beijing Duck and all that. But it's kind of hard to appreciate good food when you have a perpetual stuffed up nose and sore throat due to the air pollution problem. Blech. I'm really glad I saw China but I don't feel the need to go back there again.

    I will definitely be back to Africa. I want to spend some more time on Zanzibar, the original spice island. Such wonderful flavors.

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    Paleobird, your travels sound great! I have to agree that the most primal friendly places I've been are probably in Asia. China has a lot of good options, and of course Japan has the seafood. I really loved China, though I liked Shanghai a lot better than Beijing. The smog in Beijing is terrible, and I had a panic attack going up the cable car thing at the Great Wall, ha!

    Australia had a lot of variety as well.

    Oh, and Spain... Spain was ALL about the meat, which I remember well because I was vegan when we were there, and it was VERY difficult to be vegan there!

    India obviously was vegetarian heavy, didn't really care for the food there at all to be honest.

    Italy was all about the pasta & "rolls".

    London's getting a lot better for food these days, I was impressed at the high quality of food available recently.

    And Germany of course, I have a fondness for kraut & sausage, yum!

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    Quote Originally Posted by palebluedots View Post
    Paleobird, your travels sound great! I have to agree that the most primal friendly places I've been are probably in Asia. China has a lot of good options, and of course Japan has the seafood. I really loved China, though I liked Shanghai a lot better than Beijing. The smog in Beijing is terrible, and I had a panic attack going up the cable car thing at the Great Wall, ha!

    Australia had a lot of variety as well.

    Oh, and Spain... Spain was ALL about the meat, which I remember well because I was vegan when we were there, and it was VERY difficult to be vegan there!

    India obviously was vegetarian heavy, didn't really care for the food there at all to be honest.

    Italy was all about the pasta & "rolls".

    London's getting a lot better for food these days, I was impressed at the high quality of food available recently.

    And Germany of course, I have a fondness for kraut & sausage, yum!
    Oh, yes the kangaroo in Australia was delicious. And so many interesting immigrant restaurants like Turkish, Lebanese, etc.

    I love Spanish food. I spent a lot of time in Europe as a starving student on a budget but even then you could eat (and drink) well. In the little town in southern France where I lived there was a shop that sold wine by the liter, BYO jug. Five francs a liter and it was really good wine.

    The northern Italian cuisine is more Primal friendly I think. More chicken, veal, salads. Not so much pasta and bread.

    The food in England always seemed to be sturdy and nourishing but not particularly interesting to me. Good sausages though.

    I used to be married to a German so I learned how to cook some things from his mother. She wanted to make sure that I kept her baby happy. Her Black Forrest cake recipe was the best. Those folks seriously know their sausages.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleobird View Post
    Oh, yes the kangaroo in Australia was delicious. And so many interesting immigrant restaurants like Turkish, Lebanese, etc.

    I love Spanish food. I spent a lot of time in Europe as a starving student on a budget but even then you could eat (and drink) well. In the little town in southern France where I lived there was a shop that sold wine by the liter, BYO jug. Five francs a liter and it was really good wine.

    The northern Italian cuisine is more Primal friendly I think. More chicken, veal, salads. Not so much pasta and bread.

    The food in England always seemed to be sturdy and nourishing but not particularly interesting to me. Good sausages though.

    I used to be married to a German so I learned how to cook some things from his mother. She wanted to make sure that I kept her baby happy. Her Black Forrest cake recipe was the best. Those folks seriously know their sausages.
    Yeah, I was married to a Dutchman for 10 years and I do seriously miss the sausage and speklapjes. I refused to eat balknebrij, though. He was from Arnhem (Gelderland) so it was heavy on the raisins and clove and he would fry it then sprinkle with sugar. Blech! Probably would have been fine without all that though. I also seriously miss the aged cheese and assorted pate, liverwurst and availability of game meat (including imported sprinkbok, koedoe, ostrich, kangaroo . . . ) And horse meat butchers.

    I've never been a big pasta eater and did pretty well throughout Italy. Lots of seafood on the coast, had a wonderful rabbit dish in Rome. Any coastal area will be good. Had a massive lobster in Croatia and an amazing roast suckling pig that the owner of the pension got for my husband's birthday and served along with fresh olives and olive oil from his garden.

    Spain is still my favorite though for aforementioned reasons. And the seafood is great as well. I had a wonderful baked tuna and clam in tomato sauce dish that I've been trying to duplicate with other fish. I have to get some tuna steaks to try it.

    We're planning on moving to Ecuador in a couple of years and I've been researching food there. Out in the country the livestock tends to be unpenned from what I can tell. I plan on looking for someone who would be willing to sell me whole/partial animals.

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    My food tourism has been pretty minimal.

    Nepal:
    On the menu were delicacies like top ramen, boiled potatoes, garlic soup (probably instant), and "pizza" which was like a chapati with some wilted vegetables on top. Probably the tastiest item was dal bhat with "pickle" and "spinach" and potatoes but it had a strange spice in it. Otherwise, my favorite restaurant served Western-style breakfast foods and was super cheap. I think it was $5 for about 9 of us at the table with full breakfasts and coffee and everything.

    India:
    We ate often in the mall. One cool Indian fast-food restaurant served the food on plates made of some kind of leaves sewn together. The most fun restaurant in the mall was one where they brought everyone a metal platter with a whole bunch of tiny bowls then filled the bowls with various Indian foods as fast as you could empty them until you cried please no more! Then they washed your hands with hot water and lemon. At one fancy restaurant for dinner I was dared to eat one of these hot chilis they brought out arrayed in a water glass with toothpick handles to hold them. That was the absolute hottest thing I have ever eaten. Oh my god. And I like hot things. The tastiest dish was made of okra. How shocked I was when they told me what it was! The nicest thing about India was how you could get a guava covered in chili powder while you were hiking some trail somewhere or you could get a fresh coconut right on the street.

    Mexico City:
    At a fancy restaurant I got their national dish, since it was around their Independence Day. It was a big green chili stuffed with a pomegranate and walnut creamy mixture. I didn't like it that much so I traded with the man who took us out for his Chicken Mole, which was tasty. The best thing we ate was the salsa, which they would grind up in a mortar and pestle right in front of us.

    The United States:
    Nothing beats going out for breakfast in the US. Nothing is better than being totally starving and having a big giant pancake sandwich and then still being hungry so having ice cream for dessert or a second breakfast of oatmeal with raisins, walnuts and jelly. I lived for breakfasts like these while hiking the PCT.
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    I don't know if it qualifies as tourism, this are the places I lived mostly:

    I like meat at home, in Argentina. Like I really like it and miss it a lot, all of it.
    When I'm at Rome I eat coda alla vaccinara and trippa alla romana while fighting hard to stay away from tiramisł
    Here in Parma I usually go with sausages, most times I choose the meat and use family recipes.
    All around the coast I go seafood, I love regional recipes so I do my best to work around there.
    I'd travel to GB just to get some more stilton and port, and I miss club sandwich a bit. I'm not fit enough to travel a lot and it's been more than twelve years since, I'd love to go to Australia and southern asia but doctors are not of the idea.
    I miss having breakfast in Bahia, and I miss south beach by noon when I was out with friends doing very unprimal stuff. I'd love some crab soup I had once in Louisiana, my friend had grandma and she was a real cook (that woman was a hundred years work of wonder and I didn't get a single word out of the recipe she was trying so hard to explain to me).
    Cebiche in Peru and cheese and mandioca bread in Bolivia. Potatoes all over Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador. Dulce de leche o leche quemada and some small dark caramel we had when up high in the mountains.
    Tapas around Barcelona, all things about patanegra cinco bellotas (that's a blessed piece of pig they have in Spain, yes).

    I'd go to Paris to have some more strawberries and cream, but that's more of an emotional thing.

    On monday I'll be traveling to Rome again, I think I'll try something new this time.


    Paleobird /me envious I really look forward to be allowed to travel to Africa, hopefully I'll get healthy enough
    No limits, only my will and the worlds I build.

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    I've just got back from a holiday in North-East Italy and Slovenia. I enjoyed a lot of fresh mussels, prawns and other seafood. My favourite dish was a mixed seafood grill with a whole baby sea bream, a baby sole, a baby squid, some pieces of fried monkfish tail and fried grey mullet. Eaten with a side of rosemary-infused oven-baked potatoes. Generally the fish and vegetable dishes are quite plain and primal friendly, if expensive compared to the pizza and pasta dishes which I obviously shun. I cooked veggie and goats' cheese omelettes for breakfast and for lunch I ate various goodies from deli-counters with rice salad. Ironically, but unsurprisingly, two of the best meals we had were at a Chinese and Japanese restaurant. My cheats were the traditional gelati - redcurrant, chestnut and Sicilian pistachio were my favourites among those I tried.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    These are all from Ecuador, which is a surprisingly easy place to stay semi-paleo (grain free at least, but be willing to eat potatoes) while traveling. Had a lot of meat, fish, potatoes, fresh avocados, and fruit.

    I'm not really a food tourist in the sense that I don't plan my vacations/trips around food, but I definitely make an effort to try the local cuisine when I'm in another country.
    Subduction leads to orogeny

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