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    captain joel's Avatar
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    organic eggs vs burford browns (london)

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    burford browns eggs are not officially organic, but the birds are fed a 'vegetarian' diet and left to forage

    organic eggs are well, organic

    my question is which do you go for, I have a bit of both nowadays, the thing is the so called vegetarian diet of the burford browns could be grains and corn

    and the organic birds could be fed organic grains and corn

    what does one do?

    there is actually a farm next to where i live, the eggs were delicious, but i need to check what they are fed, that may be my personal answer, but what to do when on the road, which would you go for ?

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    Birds are equipped to eat grains. You don't avoid birds that eat grains you avoid birds that eat solely grains and that are kept in unhealthful conditions, such as locked in a cramped building with no real access to the outdoors.
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain joel View Post
    burford browns eggs are not officially organic, but the birds are fed a 'vegetarian' diet and left to forage

    organic eggs are well, organic

    my question is which do you go for, I have a bit of both nowadays, the thing is the so called vegetarian diet of the burford browns could be grains and corn

    and the organic birds could be fed organic grains and corn

    what does one do?
    Yeah, interesting. From the description the Burford Browns get to "forage"--but what that means we don't know. (Potentially, not much ground for not a lot of time.) The "organic hens" may, or may not, get to ...

    I'd probably buy the Burford Brown eggs on that basis. BTW, where is this? Waitrose?

    there is actually a farm next to where i live, the eggs were delicious, but i need to check what they are fed, that may be my personal answer, but what to do when on the road, which would you go for ?
    That's another fascinating discussion. Perhaps if they really are delicious then that's your senses sending you back information and you ought to pay attention to that.

    On the road, I like the sound of the Burford Browns. Why would anyone keep a heritage breed if they weren't interested in something more than a narrow economic perspective?--eggs per hen, in this case--I'll guarantee you any old breed isn't a top layer. They can maybe reckon on more per egg, but still I don't think they're working purely on an economic basis, so they'd get my money.
    Last edited by Lewis; 08-21-2012 at 11:12 AM. Reason: spelling

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    vegitarian diet could mean they are being fed soy.
    Not to mention.. if they really are "foraging" then there not really vegitarian..... Yummmm. Bugs....
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    Quote Originally Posted by DinoHunter View Post
    vegitarian diet could mean they are being fed soy.
    Not to mention.. if they really are "foraging" then there not really vegitarian..... Yummmm. Bugs....
    They can technically be "fed" a vegetarian diet because "fed" implies that the feeding is done by a person. But yeah, they'd still be eating bugs when they are foraging, which not "being fed". Ah, marketing...

    Of course, I'd rather they were eating bugs anyway.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncephalized View Post
    They can technically be "fed" a vegetarian diet because "fed" implies that the feeding is done by a person. But yeah, they'd still be eating bugs when they are foraging, which not "being fed". Ah, marketing...

    Of course, I'd rather they were eating bugs anyway.
    Yup... Nothing wrong with bug fed chickens.. thats why I get my eggs from the farmer down the road.. I know the feathered providers of breakfast are out every day eating bugs & soaking up the rays
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncephalized View Post
    They can technically be "fed" a vegetarian diet because "fed" implies that the feeding is done by a person. But yeah, they'd still be eating bugs when they are foraging, which not "being fed". Ah, marketing...

    Of course, I'd rather they were eating bugs anyway.
    Sure.

    But I don't necessarily see "a vegetarian diet" as being a sinister term here. I'd guess what it probably means is something like "Don't worry, we're not feeding them pelleted recycled cattle carcasses declared unfit for human consumption or pelleted sterilized droppings from other farm animals or the like".

    Too much soy or maize wouldn't be good, but there's worse stuff out there.

    I guess in Joel Salatin's ideal world we'd all be keeping our own hens in the back garden and giving them kitchen scraps, and I guess kitchen scraps from some Primal kitchens would mean hens dining like royalty. They say "you can't turn the clock back" but why would "they" need to assert you couldn't unless actually you could? ... but I don't see many of us doing that all the same.

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    I appreciate the responses

    The Burford Brows can be bought in most supermarkets, I buy them from Sainsburys.

    Everything brought up in discussion is valid, vegetarian diet may not be as desirable as it sounds, organic is a bit of an empty term, and doe snot prohibit grains etc

    Nonetheless we can all agree, organic free range in pasture eggs are better than your bog standard eggs.

    The brows caught my eye as it said they are left to forage, as I do not fall victim to the organic label, It seemed promising

    Now look at the web site, it looks very promising.

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    But they are fed maize corn .... well at least its not gmo

    the question is are the organics fed corn too... probably yes

    So whilst the browns are fed corn too, and are not officially organic, they seem more natural to me

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    Quote Originally Posted by captain joel View Post
    The Burford Brows can be bought in most supermarkets, I buy them from Sainsburys.
    Right. I was thinking I'd seen them in Waitrose, but that may have been Old Cotswold Legbar (the ones with blue eggshells). :-)

    The Old Cotswold Legbar seemed like good eggs. The yolks were actually orange. Assuming they're not feeding the hens a dye to make them orange, that seems like a good sign.

    I think Sainsbury's varies. My local one has Hoads Farm free range eggs, which seem fine.

    What Waitrose also does is "organic free range" from Duchy Foods, which is the Prince of Wales's own label. That seems to tick a lot of boxes. I think I'd also trust Charles. I mean some companies might do the minimum for organic standards compliance just to get the higher price, but I think Charles would be likely to do whatever he thought was best all round -- best for the customer, best for the chicken, best for the land. I think anything less would be offensive to his ethical (even religious) standards. You don't plant something like Highgrove Garden unless you're seriously interested in doing what's best in a deep and meaningful way:

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    You can also buy eggs from little egg producers - small farms which sell free range, small holdings etc. In Sussex where I live there are quite a number of houses / gateways with "free range eggs for sale" signs. Same where my parents live in Northumberland, and where I keep my narrow boat in Northamptonshire.

    The eggs are great, really fresh, and tend to be cheap. I eat loads of them and haven't had to buy an egg from a supermarket for over 30 years. It's so nice to see the hens foraging about when you are poking cash into the little money box thing!

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