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Thread: How strong should I be? page 2

  1. #11
    Coach Palfrey's Avatar
    Coach Palfrey is offline Senior Member
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    It can be confusing with the huge array of different programmes and information on offer. It sounds as though you could do with a little goal setting before making any adjustments. The standard barbell programmes are strength programmes but that actually isn't what a lot of people want or need - it's just become very trendy for our industry to jump on that bandwagon. It's at a point now where people can be frowned upon for doing anything outside a certain programme and that's just plain bullshit. It happens on this forum too.

    What's most important is that your programming supports your goals. What are your goals?

  2. #12
    RusM's Avatar
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    https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...Ri3o_q3Q&pli=1
    Here's some strength standards by weight and training level courtesy of the Internet.

  3. #13
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    wolfman is offline Senior Member
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    I just want to be strong and fit, I don't care about aesthetics, I have no desire to look big with out having relative strength. I want to be strong and have a healthy amount of body fat, I would like to bench 275x1, Squat 315x1, Dead 365, and OHP 185x1, If I hit those numbers I would feel strong, while still being in good condition. I was very primal this summer and got lean, but I wanted to get bigger and stronger so I upped my calories, and I feel off the primal wagon and gained some fat, I just feel like I can't get stronger or bigger if I don't shoved 3,500 calories down my throat a day, and when I'm on primal diet, it's hard, I'm just not that hungry.

  4. #14
    Coach Palfrey's Avatar
    Coach Palfrey is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
    I just want to be strong and fit, I don't care about aesthetics, I have no desire to look big with out having relative strength. I want to be strong and have a healthy amount of body fat, I would like to bench 275x1, Squat 315x1, Dead 365, and OHP 185x1, If I hit those numbers I would feel strong, while still being in good condition. I was very primal this summer and got lean, but I wanted to get bigger and stronger so I upped my calories, and I feel off the primal wagon and gained some fat, I just feel like I can't get stronger or bigger if I don't shoved 3,500 calories down my throat a day, and when I'm on primal diet, it's hard, I'm just not that hungry.
    In that case I'd certainly continue with the basic lifts and aim to add weight as often as you can. Supplement this with some high intensity conditioning stuff from time to time. I also cycle in more bodyweight focused weeks from time to time. And I put in the assistance exercises that I know help me with some of the sticking points in the main lifts.

    It's good not giving a shit about aesthetics - makes it easier to focus on performance and feeling good.

  5. #15
    otzi's Avatar
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    Why not use the Primal Blueprint measures for fitness?
    I don't have them here, but it was something like: 20 pullups, 1 mile swim, 2 mile run. Anyone else know what they are--they were in the front of the PBF Free Fitness e-book.

  6. #16
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Oh, here it is:

    • 1/2 mile swim
    • 200 yard run, at full sprint speed
    • Ability to jump over waist-high objects
    • 15–20+ pullups
    • 25+ dips
    I would add that anyone should be fit enough
    to take on a new fun activity without fearing an
    injury. In fact, true fitness can best be defined by
    the acquiring of a variety of strengths and skills,
    a combination of speed, power, agility, endurance
    balance, and coordination…all the while enjoying
    excellent health. Fitness is no longer simply
    a snapshot measure of how much you can bench
    press or how fast you can run a marathon. True
    fitness is more a question of how many push-ups
    you can stop and do in the middle of a 5k run while
    carrying a child on your back…while looking fabulous
    in a skin tight racing suit!

  7. #17
    emerson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    Oh, here it is:
    ...
    True fitness is more a question of how many push-ups
    you can stop and do in the middle of a 5k run while
    carrying a child on your back…while looking fabulous
    in a skin tight racing suit!
    Careful, Crossfit(TM) might sue you...

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfman View Post
    Hey all, just thinking, feeling weak in the gym as of late. Just wanted to throw my numbers out there and see what other people were hitting, I just don't know if I am strong, sometimes I feel strong sometimes I don't.

    Squat: 275 x 3
    Military: 135 x5
    Dead: 315 x 1
    Bench: 245 x 2

    All my lifts feel fine except my bench, it just always feels so heavy.
    I think the hardest thing to remember at times like this is what some of our colleagues have said, which is that strength is a relative kind of thing. What it means to be "strong" in the sense of competitive power lifting is clearly not the same thing as what it means to be "strong" for you, given genetics, how long you have been lifting, and all of that.

    Having once been about as lean as you described myself, I might personally caution against shoving thousands of calories in your mouth in the hopes that this will increase strength. I learned the hard way that eating like a body builder doesn't work well unless you lift that way - and it didn't sound like you did.

    If you want a program which will push your totals up, I might suggest something called the Juggernaut method. It uses rep-maxes and 4 "waves" to push your numbers up. I found it fairly helpful (prior to an injury), and plan on starting it again in a few weeks.

    You might also use a 5-rep max scheme and just set goals. Back off from your max and work back up to it, doing each type of lift once a week. Avoid too much assistance work, so that you don't get worn down.

    But definitely get some core/ab work in. That will help the rest out a lot. Power-wheel crawls or planks would be helpful here.

    In the end, though, it's about being stronger tomorrow than we are today. At least, that's how I see it.

    Good luck!

  9. #19
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    The answer is, you should be as strong as possible!!

    Which means you should always be gaining more strength, every day, day by day by day.

  10. #20
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    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Weightlifting Performance Standards

    this should give you a pretty good idea of where you fall for each lift.

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