Page 5 of 17 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 166

Thread: Soy page 5

  1. #41
    Gilleh's Avatar
    Gilleh is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    445
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    Soy has been a part of the human diet for around 5,000 years.
    Neolithic food FTL.
    Everything is bad for something - How do you feel today?

  2. #42
    JamesS's Avatar
    JamesS is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    457
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Its unfortunate that soy has become the black sheep of the legume family. I personally think it has more to do with "he who cant be named" (Monsanto). Yes there are phytoestrogens in soy, and yes there are phytoestrogens in flax as well as cashews, almonds, rice, quinoa, spinach, and the beloved sweet potato.
    Yes. And apples, onions, garlic, grapes, pomegranates, seaweeds, lettuce, blueberries and every other plant humans consume.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    That being said IMO its the shear volume of products that soy has found its way in to that makes it such a target. If one really wanted to rid the body of excess estrogens look at all the man made chemical compounds that severely alter not just our hormone levels but the hormone levels of our offspring. BPA/S, dioxins and other obesogens are the room in which the soy bean sits. Why doesnt anyone talk about those?
    Again, I totally agree. As where phytoestrogens are 200-400 times weaker than human estrogens, and other mammal estrogens tend to be stronger than human estrogens they should also be mentioned. But xenoestrogens like DDT, dioxins and PCBs that also tend to be found in animal proteins are on average 30,000 to 100,000 times stronger than human estrogens. So which estrogenic compounds should we really be worried about?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    I dont recommend soy as I feel there are better choices out there. I wont recommend soy because a large population is allergic to it. But at the same time buying canned sardines, oysters, tuna, salmon thinking that these items are going to help one raise the O3 intake does far more damage to the overall sytem from toxic phytoestrogens than a bowl of edamame anyday.
    Yes, soy is a common allergen. So are beef, eggs and dairy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    I would also like to add that I dont recommend soy because of the correlation between soy consumption and lower testosterone levels. I had to plug in my tablet and wanted post before I found the references. Unfortunately I cant find those either. JamesS can you comment?
    Soy does not reduce testosterone. That is just another of the debunked myths that refuse to die because people would rather believe something they hear that is negative than to research the facts. Same reason the negative campaign ads work so well. Anyway, here is a study proving it:

    Serum prostate-specific antigen but not test... [Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006] - PubMed - NCBI

  3. #43
    magicmerl's Avatar
    magicmerl is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,904
    How long has unfermented soy been consumed for?
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
    Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
    TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
    bloodorchid is always right

  4. #44
    Jerseyjim's Avatar
    Jerseyjim is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    What's wrong with legumes? Legumes have health benefits as well.
    Umm, cause they make me gassy

    Last week I ate some mixed nuts that included peanuts. Picked out all the peanuts from what I ate...you still didn't want to be downwind of me the next day. I was surprised, didn't realize how powerful the effect was for me til I went primal; lesson learned.

    I think the comment about Roundup-ready soybeans (the GM version that can have Roundup sprayed right onto it to control weeds without it killing the soybean plant) is spot-on.

    Maria Rodale: Why GE Labeling Is Monsanto's Worst Nightmare

    The above is an opinion piece, not reporting. But it's an interesting quick read.

  5. #45
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    8,718
    I'm not convinced I should eat soy instead of beef. I ate a lot of soy before and now I don't. I eat a lot of beef now and I look and feel better than ever.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Highest squat: 167.5 x 2. Current Deadlift: 190 x 3

  6. #46
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by Piscator View Post
    Okay, Iron Will, while I stated that I cannot pinpoint any one food as a problem, I definitely focused my diet attention on increasing my O3 to O6 ratio and it seems to have been a benefit. If you've read this thread from the beginning, can you give me some indication of your opinion on O3 intake in regards to that last paragraph? What I've done is working, and I'd welcome any further understanding.
    If it came across as I was singling you out by no means was that my intention. I supplement with fish oil myself and recommend them to all my clients. Fish oils are fanstastic! They work on so many systems it's hard to find another product that is so benificial. I was making my comment based on other threads that I have read about people who eat canned sardines etc. believing they are better for you than a fish oil supplement. Personally I take up to 15 grams a day of fish oil.

  7. #47
    Radialhead's Avatar
    Radialhead is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Purton, UK
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    Personally I take up to 15 grams a day of fish oil.
    When it comes to fish oil, more is not better

  8. #48
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesS View Post
    Yes. And apples, onions, garlic, grapes, pomegranates, seaweeds, lettuce, blueberries and every other plant humans consume.



    Again, I totally agree. As where phytoestrogens are 200-400 times weaker than human estrogens, and other mammal estrogens tend to be stronger than human estrogens they should also be mentioned. But xenoestrogens like DDT, dioxins and PCBs that also tend to be found in animal proteins are on average 30,000 to 100,000 times stronger than human estrogens. So which estrogenic compounds should we really be worried about?



    Yes, soy is a common allergen. So are beef, eggs and dairy.



    Soy does not reduce testosterone. That is just another of the debunked myths that refuse to die because people would rather believe something they hear that is negative than to research the facts. Same reason the negative campaign ads work so well. Anyway, here is a study proving it:

    Serum prostate-specific antigen but not test... [Eur J Clin Nutr. 2006] - PubMed - NCBI
    Thanks for the link JamesS. PudMed is awesome. I'll continue my research and I'll still try to find those links to post.

  9. #49
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by Radialhead View Post
    Here's an excerpt from your link.

    "Interest in fish oil supplementation started with observations that the Inuit had almost no heart disease. It was assumed their high intake of marine oils produced this benefit. While this may be true, at least in part, what was overlooked is that the Inuit don’t consume marine oils in isolation. They eat them as part of a whole-food diet that also includes other nutrients which may help prevent the oxidative damage that otherwise occurs with such a high intake of fragile, n-3 PUFA.

    It’s also important to note that there are many other traditional peoples, such as the Masai, the Tokelau, and the Kitavans, that are virtually free of heart disease but do not consume high amounts of marine oils. What these diets all share in common is not a large intake of omega-3 fats, but instead a complete absence of modern, refined foods.

    Eat fish, not fish oil – cod liver oil excepted
    That is why the best approach is to dramatically reduce intake of omega-6 fat, found in industrial seed oils and processed and refined foods, and then eat a nutrient-dense, whole-foods based diet that includes fatty fish, shellfish and organ meats. This mimics our ancestral diet and is the safest and most sane approach to meeting our omega-3 needs – which as Chris Masterjohn points out, are much lower than commonly assumed.

    Some may ask why I continue to recommend fermented cod liver oil (FCLO), in light of everything I’ve shared in this article. There are a few reasons. First, I view FCLO as primarily a source of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, K2 and E) – not EPA and DHA. Second, in the context of a nutrient-dense diet that excludes industrial seed oils and refined sugar, and is adequate in vitamin B6, biotin, calcium, magnesium and arachidonic acid, the risk of oxidative damage that may occur with 1g/d of cod liver oils is outweighed by the benefits of the fat-soluble vitamins.

    So I still recommend eating fatty fish a couple times per week, and taking cod liver oil daily, presuming your diet is as I described above. What I don’t endorse is taking several grams per day of fish oil, especially for an extended period of time. Unfortunately this advice is becoming more and more common in the nutrition world.

    More is not always better, despite our tendency to believe it is.

    Note: As always, I’m open to discussion and dissenting views. But please don’t link to short-term studies on the efficacy of fish oil, because as I’ve explained in this article, it’s the long-term effects that we’re primarily concerned with. I’d be interested in seeing any studies longer than 2 years showing that 1) fish oil benefits extend beyond reducing arrhythmia in patients with chronic heart failure and patients who have recently survived a heart attack, 2) doses higher than 1g/d produce a larger benefit than doses of 1g/d, and (most importantly) 3) doses of >1g/d or higher do not increase the risk of heart disease or death"





    I'd like to high light the comments made by the doctor about the Inuit and the low levels of heart disease. He also includes the comment "They eat them as part of a whole-food diet that also includes other nutrients..." Whole food diet is the key here. We all should be eating a "whole food" diet. But when comparing the SAD with supplementation vs. "whole food" diet and supplementation the results will be different. The doctor also makes the statement of using fermented cod liver oil because of the fat soluble vitamins (cue the I hate vit A zealots).

    Fish oil is good for you. long term and short term. The only difference is what else you eat with it. Would I recommend a soccer mom who has difficulty walking up 4 flights of stairs 15 grams of fish oil a day? No. Do I recommend taking 15 grams of fish oil every day for eternity? No. Alternating sources and amounts is key to any supplementation, just like exercise programs. Your body will adjust to dosage if you continue the same volume everyday day in day out. Making adjustments of type, supplier, fermented vs non, high O3 vs low and over all volume allows the body to get the best results.
    Last edited by Iron Will; 08-20-2012 at 10:30 AM.

  10. #50
    Iron Will's Avatar
    Iron Will is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vancouver B.C
    Posts
    621
    PrimalCon New York
    Quote Originally Posted by Radialhead View Post
    I would also like to add that 15 grams sounds like a lot, but what about 3 teaspoons? They're equal. How many people put a teaspoon of sugar in each of their multiple cups of coffee or tea?

Page 5 of 17 FirstFirst ... 3456715 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •