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Thread: Gr Lakes Kosher Gelatin vs their Collagen Hydrolysate page

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    KerryK's Avatar
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    Gr Lakes Kosher Gelatin vs their Collagen Hydrolysate

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    I want to get my 93 yr old Dad some gelatin to put in his whey protein smoothie I make for him. I also give him a cup of 72 hr bone broth every day, but he's in bad shape (back, shoulder, knee) and glucosamine chondraite w/msm plus the cup of broth isn't enough. I'll try to make even more broth to try increasing the broth to 2 cups but really want to give him some Great Lakes gelatin, too.

    In a 2012 blog posting http://www.marksdailyapple.com/is-it...#axzz23fV54lHx , Mark gives us a link to the kosher gelatin but also cites a study where the hydrolysate made healthier bones in rats. Anyone use either product and can advise me what to buy first?

    Here's what he had to say:

    "Unflavored Gelatin

    The protein powder-, squatz-, oatz-, and gainz-obsessed online lifting culture may frown upon gelatin as a source of protein, but it has its place in a healthy diet. Sure, gelatin, with its unanabolic amino acid profile, can’t be relied upon as a primary protein source – it’s not going to get you huge – and early attempts at protein fasts using gelatin instead of more complete proteins resulted in the most permanent weight loss method of all: death. But as an adjunct to a protein-replete diet? Gelatin is great and underappreciated.

    Hard clinical evidence of its benefits are scant. Anecdotes report benefits to bone, joint, and skin health. I’ve found that a warm cup of gelatin broth just before bed gets me incredibly sleepy. Perhaps its the glycine in the gelatin, which one study found to be effective for improving sleep in humans. Another study found that dietary gelatin reduced joint pain in athletes. At any rate, it seems helpful, if not essential.

    Of course, I’d rather you get your gelatin through bone broth and gelatin-rich cuts like chicken feet, oxtail, ribs, and shanks. These will offer nutrients and complete protein along with the “incomplete” gelatinous protein, and they taste incredible. But if you’re not eating those cuts, if you’re not making broth, if the only meat you eat is completely free of gristle and bone and cartilage and sinew, incorporating a little unflavored gelatin is a worthy consideration to make. Before the days of shrinkwrapped sirloins, 95% lean ground beef, and discarding over 50% of the live weight of a cow carcass as “inedible,” humans utilized the entire animal – tendons, bones, feet, hide, cartilage, head, skin, and all the rest. That’s a lot of gelatin we evolved eating, gelatin that you’re no longer eating.*Think of unflavored gelatin as a replacement for that.

    For optimal digestion, gelatin should be dissolved in warm water before drinking (in one study, hydrolyzed collagen, but not undissolved gelatin, improved bone health in rats). This isn’t a very interesting way to eat it, though, so you might try adding a little fruit juice or tea to the mix and refrigerating it until it gelatinizes. Then you have a fairly healthy jello.

    If you’re worried about the source of the gelatin, for ethical or nutritional reasons, you can always use a grass-fed bovine gelatin, like this one.

    Verdict: Primal."

    Here are the two products from Great Lakes that I'm pondering:

    Amazon.com: Great Lakes Gelatin, Collagen Hydrolysate (Kosher) 16-Ounce: Health & Personal Care
    Great Lakes Unflavored Gelatin, Kosher, 16-Ounce Can (Pack of 2): Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

    Thanks, all.

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    KerryK's Avatar
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    I'm hoping to order it today, so bumpity bump. I hope some one out there can advise me...

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    Of course, I’d rather you get your gelatin through bone broth and gelatin-rich cuts like chicken feet, oxtail, ribs, and shanks.
    To this list add skin. It will sometimes be on pork belly (if you shop at a real butcher shop or ethnic market) and sometimes it'll be sold alone. You can add this to soups to thicken them up with collagen and whatever else makes skin taste thick and sticky.

    Whenever I make oxtails in the crockpot I put the leftovers plus the liquid into a container in the fridge and there's always a layer of gelatin that forms. We're talking with a consistency like jello. One day I cut it into cubes and mixed it with tomatoes for a salad. Pretty tasty.

    But if you are more interested in processed foods, knox is probably sufficient.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 175 x 3. Current Deadlift: 225 x 3

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    KerryK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    To this list add skin. It will sometimes be on pork belly (if you shop at a real butcher shop or ethnic market) and sometimes it'll be sold alone. You can add this to soups to thicken them up with collagen and whatever else makes skin taste thick and sticky.

    Whenever I make oxtails in the crockpot I put the leftovers plus the liquid into a container in the fridge and there's always a layer of gelatin that forms. We're talking with a consistency like jello. One day I cut it into cubes and mixed it with tomatoes for a salad. Pretty tasty.

    But if you are more interested in processed foods, knox is probably sufficient.
    Oh, no, I give him 72 hour bone broth every day. But he's practically crippled with pain and in bad shape. It's a terrible struggle getting him to eat and he likes the broth but there's only so much I can make and serve him. I figured a little extra of the processed stuff couldn't hurt (?) in addition to the broth. It takes 3 days to make and we'd run out (I have active Crohn's and drink one cup a day, too). My bone broth is jello in the fridge, too.

    I'll look into the skin, thanks for suggesting it ... money's tight, but once a week I can do pork belly from a good farmer for him (I'll crisp it up like you do) and yup, I make him oxtail soup too). Getting him to eat it might be a challenge - it's easier getting my 10 yr old to try stuff nowadays.

    But my question is wondering which kind to get - the hydroxylate or the regular stuff.

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    sbhikes's Avatar
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    If you're making all this bone broth, why bother with processed powdered gelatin at all? Just keep a crock pot constantly making soup and throw in a pigs foot for extra gelatin. Anyway, to actually answer your question, I have no idea about powdered gelatin.
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    Starting squat: 45lbs. Current squat: 175 x 3. Current Deadlift: 225 x 3

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