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  1. #11
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    Or get de-glycerized licorice from any vendor of supplements. Worked for me ~15 years ago.

    Oh, and the reason my gut was messed was from using Ibuprofen. Be careful of any pain relievers (aspirin or NSAIDs), because they really irritate the stomach lining, and then other things like coffee worsen it.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    Get yourself tested! Mine is still likely candida, as I'm getting yeast infections on and off when I start introducing sugar of any kind
    See, that doesn't happen to me anymore. I was tested months ago and was positive (February). Not sure how reliable that test was (vega food allergy test).

    Also, my doc says candida tests are absolutely not reliable.
    Last edited by patski; 08-15-2012 at 02:25 PM.
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  3. #13
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    I know Advil is bad for leaky gut...but what the hell else do you do when you're a woman and it's that time of the month?!

    AND DON'T SAY IODINE!
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    James, are you an herbalist?
    I actually work with a variety of "alternative" medicines, but herbs are one of the primary things I work with. I design formulas, and teach classes on dealing with health holistically as well as take people on herb walks in our local deserts and mountains to show people what they can eat and use for medicine. I was in allopathic medicine for 13 years but left due to the massive corruption and simply the fact that most of the medical system knows virtually nothing about medicine.

    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    Where can I find these powders? I live in Canada, and ordering online from the US will probably be a pain in the rear.
    Canada is a bit of an issue when it comes to herbs and supplements. When I was traveling up there I visited a few health foods stores and the selections were rather limited. Talking to some of the store owners I found that a big issue is that Canada requires supplement labels in French and English, so many manufacturers are not going to hassle with redesigning their labels to fit Canadian regulations. And I have made several shipments of herbs up to Canada, but they keep getting stopped by Canadian Customs, so I don't even try anymore.

    Still, both herbs are pretty common so your local health food store should carry them or probably have suppliers they can get them from.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    I'm interested, but live in the US. Need to get some vitamin C anyway, but can't have fruit right now so I'll have to find a good supplement for it.
    Natural sources tend to be stronger and more stable that the higher unstable synthetic ascorbic acid. I refer acerola cherry, rosehips or amla berry, which are all also low sugar. I avoid camu camu since it is so unstable.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    Tasha, I'm honestly starting to wonder if I even have candida or not. I'm eating fruit here and there, and starch. My worst symptoms right now are indigestion. It sounds like all my symptoms go right back to adrenal fatigue.
    Indigestion is generally a great indicator of insufficient levels of stomach acid. This can lead to issues such as bloating, slow gastric emptying and acid reflux.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by namelesswonder View Post
    Get yourself tested! Mine is still likely candida, as I'm getting yeast infections on and off when I start introducing sugar of any kind
    Candida is a dimorphic microbe. So it can exist as a benign yeast or as a pathogenic fungus depending on the pH of the terrain. A normal acidic environment turns the Candida growth gene off and keeps the Candida in its benign yeast form. In an alkaline environment the Candida growth gene is activated and the Candida morphs in to its pathogenic and aggressive fungal form. The acidic pH is maintained by our acid forming Lactobacillus and Bifidus bacterium. Cultured foods and fibers are the best way to maintain the flora.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Or get de-glycerized licorice from any vendor of supplements. Worked for me ~15 years ago.
    The problem with DGL (deglycyrrhizinated licorice) is that it removes the steroidal anti-inflammatory component from the licorice root. DGL is mainly used to treat Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Oh, and the reason my gut was messed was from using Ibuprofen. Be careful of any pain relievers (aspirin or NSAIDs), because they really irritate the stomach lining, and then other things like coffee worsen it.
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs screw with the stomach and increase the risk of bleeding ulcers because they interfere with prostaglandins. There are both inflammatory and non-inflammatory prostaglandins, but these drugs rarely differentiate. Inflammatory prostaglandins are released when tissues are injured to dilate blood vessels. This increases oxygen and nutrients to the area to help promote healing. The over dilation of blood vessels though also causes them to leak fluids in to the surrounding tissues causing the swelling. NSAIDs are used to inhibit the prostaglandins, which causes the blood vessels to constrict. This prevents the fluid leakage, but also inhibits healing and increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, liver failure, tinnitus etc. Even though these adverse effect can happen with a single, recommended dose the risk is greatest for those with already impaired circulation. For example, diabetics and those with congestive heart failure.

    The role these drugs play in ulcer formation is that these drugs can also interfere with non-inflammatory prostaglandins that are needed to stimulate the formation of the stomach's protective lining. Without this protective lining the stomach acid can directly "attack" the stomach wall leading to ulcerations.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    Also, my doc says candida tests are absolutely not reliable.
    I totally agree. Everyone has Candida, but not everyone has candidiasis. From what I have seen the tests really do not differentiate between the two.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by patski View Post
    I know Advil is bad for leaky gut...but what the hell else do you do when you're a woman and it's that time of the month?!

    AND DON'T SAY IODINE!
    Have you tried magnesium malate or magnesium citrate supplementation? Magnesium is a smooth muscle relaxant and reduces menstrual cramps by acting as a natural calcium channel blocker, so in this case is best supplemented without calcium.

    It is believed that women often crave chocolate around menstruation due to the high magnesium content of the chocolate.

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