Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: Plantar Fasciitis and Vibram Five FIngers. page 2

  1. #11
    wiltondeportes's Avatar
    wiltondeportes Guest
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by gstuartw View Post
    I must admit that I've looked upon the Vibram Five Fingers footwear with amusement and asserted to myself that I'd never wear such an item.

    Joining MDA (Mark's Daily Apple) I've found myself revisiting those shoes...gloves? Foot gloves? Reading Mark's comments has given me pause to look at them with different eyes. Never the less, I have what might be a conflict with wearing them and that is Plantar Fasciitis.

    A couple of years ago I started developing foot issues that were diagnosed as Plantar Fasciitis. This condition was brought on by a combination of long hours on my feet in the film business and 3 days a week fitness boot camp held primarily on asphalt.

    I have been advised to wear footwear that supports my arch as often as possible. I avoid going barefoot as much as I can wearing Birkenstocks around the house etc. Additionally I had custom orthotics made to use daily in what ever type of shoe I am wearing be it work or exercise.

    Anyone have thoughts on wearing the Vibram Five Fingers in consideration of Plantar Fasciitis?
    I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis when I was in 7th grade (13 years old). I was the type of guy that played sports every season, ran around at recess (although middle school ended that), and was active all summer. It crushed me. It became immensely painful to just walk from class to class at school.

    I then got those hard plastic inserts and had to find shoes that fit them (impossible). I had to stop playing some of those sports and found a sport I could participate in without too much time on my feet. This was wrestling, and I digress.

    Fast forward to my sophomore year in high school. I was sick and tired of finding shoes that fit my orthotics and not having the stamina to run around on my feet like everyone else. I searched the web for answers, and found some things to try. I did heel raises and possibly another exercise I forget now while watching TV at night. I rolled my plantar around on a tennis ball to massage it. I did this for about a month, took out my inserts, and I never looked back. I can now run barefoot no problem.

  2. #12
    wendyland's Avatar
    wendyland is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    141
    I've had plantars fasciitis for about 5 years (since my last pregnancy). I've always been a minimal shoe/barefoot person, so I have a hard time believing that the vibrams are the cure all. Maybe for some. For me, I had it pretty much healed by eating a low inflammation diet and eating fish oil & diatomaceous earth(I was eating this due to a pinworm outbreak at preschool). Then, I went to disney world and walked all day for 4 days in a row and the pain came back.

    Wearing the boot at night that stretches helped me, too.

  3. #13
    Lewis's Avatar
    Lewis is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,316
    Quote Originally Posted by wendyland View Post
    ... I have a hard time believing that the vibrams are the cure all.
    Sure, I think that would be going too far.

    Although there now seem to be quite a few joggers who wear minimalist shoes, I'd guess that if they're wearing them in the hope that they make them bullet-proof they might be mistaken. If your mechanics are poor, and you do too much of something, and your diet's inadequate ...

    I don't expect minimalist shoes will end the injury problems among joggers who use them, although they'll probably greatly reduce them.

  4. #14
    mommymd's Avatar
    mommymd is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    187
    I agree with the foot strengthening and ball rolling suggestions. Also stretch your Achilles's tendon.

    mommymd

  5. #15
    Primal123's Avatar
    Primal123 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    242
    I had PF recently and found some stretches online that totally eliminated it as long as I remember to do the stretches each day. I think walking barefoot makes way more sense than arch supports and shoes all the time. My feet were designed to walk without shoes. My friend had PF she was told to wear orthotics, arch supports all the time, never walk barefoot etc...etc... Well, her PF continued to be a problem until she found a treatment provider who suggested foot strengthening exercises and barefoot walking. Problem resolved pretty quickly after that. Foot doctor does not make any money on expensive orthotics if he tells you to walk barefoot and stretch.
    Last edited by Primal123; 08-17-2012 at 04:24 PM. Reason: typos

  6. #16
    Sissypants's Avatar
    Sissypants is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    11
    I've had PF flare ups on and off for the last 7 years. I had surgery to lengthen the tendons and 2 years later they were right back flaring up again. The only relief I've found is by wearing Kalso Earth shoes. By the heel being lower than the toes, it feels like it stretches my feet with every step I take. Now I can't wear any other brand, once I got used to them, the other brands hurt. I can even wear the Earthies high heels for hours without pain. It works for me, YMMV.

    Sierra Trading Post usually has good prices for Earth shoes, I've bought them for as little as $15. I bought my walking shoes for $30 from STP and I love them. If you can find a good sale they might be worth a try. I wish I had found them before I spent $450 on custom orthotics (that did not work at all).

    I hope you find something that works for you. Good luck.

  7. #17
    jkr's Avatar
    jkr
    jkr is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    385
    In addition to exploring chiropractic treatment and utilizing the golf balls (my chiro teacher recommends this, by the way,) also consider acupuncture. Here is a 2011 study that showed a significant decrease in PF pain by needling one point. Acupuncture Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Six Months Follow-Up You could even try moxa or acupressure, if you don't have a practitioner in your area.

  8. #18
    Bosnic's Avatar
    Bosnic is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    646
    Never understood all this "custom orthodontics". Nature/God made our foot perfect. Why would Nature/God give us feet that would require another "attachment" that was only invented recently?

  9. #19
    Sissypants's Avatar
    Sissypants is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    11
    LOL When I was younger and in so much pain I couldn't walk, I was willing to try anything to help. If that meant "custom orthotics," I tried it. I'm glad your feet are perfect, mine were not. At the time, I didn't have any internet experts telling me how to fix things myself. The "experts" (Drs) back then gave me a diagnosis and, after a second opinion confirming it, I believed them.
    Last edited by Sissypants; 08-19-2012 at 08:40 PM. Reason: remove unnecessary

  10. #20
    magick727's Avatar
    magick727 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1
    PrimalCon New York
    I was born with dual Morton's Toes, which likely led to flat footedness. By my early 20's I had developed incredibly painful fibromas on the arch of each foot I'm also about to purchase my second pair of Vibrams. The first lasted approx 1500 miles an I've found that with minimalist shoes there is no grace period between insole and pavement. The first pair of vibrams has not cured the fibromas but I'm willing to look ridiculous and pay for another pair because they forced me to begin walking correctly and understand my foots natural support structures. I firmly believe improper orthotics in conjunction with high impact sports produced the fibromas in the first place. It's somewhat ironic that I received the orthotics to address flat footedness but the relief I get from vibrams is that they taught me to walk with an arch which keeps the fibromas from impacting ground.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •