Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Working out in a fasted state page 2

  1. #11
    StackingPlates's Avatar
    StackingPlates is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    456
    Umm, attempted thread jacking? What does your post on Lalanne have to do with this thread topic?

    Okay, I'll indulge...from what I have read, LaLanne was largely a vegetarian (Ornish-like) and ate lots of grains so saying he "didn't know what a CHO was" doesn't change the fact that the majority of his diet was made up of them. I couldn't care less about this, but touting him on a Paleo™ board is mildly humorous (ironic?) to me considering these points. He was also known to take over fifty "supplements" every day which is also against core Paleo™ belief systems, me thinks...

  2. #12
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8,064
    I didn't read other replies....but, here is my N=1.

    Currently I've been working out in a 20+ hour fasted state. I do HIT resistance training 1-2x/week and eat relatively low carb (average is bellow 100g/day). So in my fasted states I have continued to get stronger.

    Just theorizing a bit here, that working out in this state would lead to your bodies better usage of fat as energy. There is a lot of keto-adapted training science articles that indicates your body becomes more resourceful in its use of carbohydrate when you are adjusted to working out in keto. In other words you can rely on fat for fuel at higher rates and at higher intensities. Seems to me that if you train consistently in a fasted state you could expect similar results, but without having to reduce carbohydrate to less than 30g/day on a consistent basis.

    I like the idea of my body saving the high octane fuel (glucose) for when it is really needed and relying on its tens of thousands of calories worth of energy stored as fat for all non life threatening circumstances.

    My view of things are from a health and metabolic perspective. I'm not going to say it is the best way to induce hypertrophy necessarily. Much comes back to what your goals are in exercising.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 08-09-2012 at 09:55 AM.

  3. #13
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8,064
    Quote Originally Posted by StackingPlates View Post
    Umm, attempted thread jacking? What does your post on Lalanne have to do with this thread topic?

    Okay, I'll indulge...from what I have read, LaLanne was largely a vegetarian (Ornish-like) and ate lots of grains so saying he "didn't know what a CHO was" doesn't change the fact that the majority of his diet was made up of them. I couldn't care less about this, but touting him on a Paleo™ board is mildly humorous (ironic?) to me considering these points. He was also known to take over fifty "supplements" every day which is also against core Paleo™ belief systems, me thinks...
    Jumping Jack was more right than wrong, and he is a prime example of why your exercise program may help or hinder your chosen style of diet. More frequent and intense work gives you more metabolic head room. More sedentary behavior typical of your standard 9-5'er.....not so much. It's much about making the two congruent with each other to reach your particular goals.

    In this recognize that the Primal Fitness Program tm goes along with the recommended eating plan quite well. Change one to a significant degree and you may have to tweak the other also.

    I wrote this after I answered with my own goals and current strategy, since it seemed relevant.
    Last edited by Neckhammer; 08-09-2012 at 10:02 AM.

  4. #14
    sbhikes's Avatar
    sbhikes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    10,187
    Jack Lalanne wasn't a vegetarian his whole life. He advocated eating meat and eggs and vegetables and staying away from bread and sugar. When the low-fat thing came out in the early 80s/late 70s, he fell for it. But since he had so many years of such a strong base of muscle and health to build on, he survived the low-fat thing very well. If you are young, you won't have any idea the icon of health and fitness that he was back in the day.

    Personally, I consider it fasted if I am hungry at the time I go work out and if I do the whole workout without eating anything (such as going for a hike without breakfast, hiking until late afternoon without lunch -- that's fasted hiking. Or going to my noon workout before lunch feeling hungry and eating lunch after at about 2 -- to me that's a fasted workout. Not much of a fast.)
    Female, 5'3", 49, Starting weight: 163lbs. Current weight: 135 (more or less).
    I can squat 180lbs, press 72.5lbs and deadlift 185lbs

  5. #15
    StackingPlates's Avatar
    StackingPlates is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    456
    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes View Post
    Personally, I consider it fasted if I am hungry at the time I go work out...
    Exactly, I mean why let a silly thing like the actual definition of fasted stop a fasted workout...

  6. #16
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by StackingPlates View Post
    Umm, attempted thread jacking? What does your post on Lalanne have to do with this thread topic?

    Okay, I'll indulge...from what I have read, LaLanne was largely a vegetarian (Ornish-like) and ate lots of grains so saying he "didn't know what a CHO was" doesn't change the fact that the majority of his diet was made up of them. I couldn't care less about this, but touting him on a Paleo™ board is mildly humorous (ironic?) to me considering these points. He was also known to take over fifty "supplements" every day which is also against core Paleo™ belief systems, me thinks...
    Didn't mean to come across as a thread "Jacker". I was trying to point out that this guy worked out in a fasted state every day and practiced IF before it had a name. I think we get wrapped up in dogma and science and could learn a little from a man who lived to be 96 lifting weights and shunning processed foods.

  7. #17
    StackingPlates's Avatar
    StackingPlates is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    456
    Maybe, maybe not.

    Counter point to this is that Jeanne Calment smoked for over a hundred years until she passed away at the age of 122. Just because she was active, cognitive, and lived until that ripe old age, I wouldn't recommend that anyone follows her lifestyle choices.

  8. #18
    otzi's Avatar
    otzi Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by StackingPlates View Post
    Maybe, maybe not.

    Counter point to this is that Jeanne Calment smoked for over a hundred years until she passed away at the age of 122. Just because she was active, cognitive, and lived until that ripe old age, I wouldn't recommend that anyone follows her lifestyle choices.
    For someone with a website proclaiming "No bro-science or dogma", you sure seem to spout both.

    Instead of lambasting Jack Lalanne and Jeanne Calmen, you should spend a little time dissecting them. From your link:

    "Calment's remarkable health presaged her later record. At age 85 (1960), she took up fencing, and continued to ride her bicycle up until her 100th birthday. Calment was still in good shape, and continued to walk until she fractured her femur during a fall at age 114 years 11 months (January 1990), which required surgery.[3][12]

    Calment smoked from the age of 21 (1896) to 117 (1992),[1][14] though according to an unspecified source, she smoked no more than two cigarettes per day.

    Calment ascribed her longevity and relatively youthful appearance for her age to olive oil, which she said she poured on all her food[4] and rubbed onto her skin, as well as a diet of port wine, and ate nearly one kilogram of chocolate every week.[11]"


    1KG of chocolate a week? Port Wine? Olive oil? Walking? Fencing? Bigtime nuggets there. You made it sound as if she laid on the couch watching soaps and stuffing bobbons in her mouth while chainsmoking Pall Malls.

  9. #19
    StackingPlates's Avatar
    StackingPlates is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    456
    Quote Originally Posted by otzi View Post
    1KG of chocolate a week? Port Wine? Olive oil? Walking? Fencing? Bigtime nuggets there. You made it sound as if she laid on the couch watching soaps and stuffing bobbons in her mouth while chainsmoking Pall Malls.
    So, in other words, you didn't read what I wrote at all or just lacked comprehension because you were excited to unleash an ad hominem attack. I'll state again, exactly what I wrote..."just because she was active, cognitive, and lived until that ripe old age".

    Not sure what part of the word "active" caused your imagination to leap straight to an image of her laying on the couch watching TV; not that any of her activities beyond smoking are relevant anyway as they are strawmen in the context of our discussion point. Nor did I "lambast" either of these individuals, your sense of dramatic flair is strong.
    Last edited by StackingPlates; 08-09-2012 at 11:22 AM.

  10. #20
    Neckhammer's Avatar
    Neckhammer is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    8,064
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by StackingPlates View Post
    Maybe, maybe not.

    Counter point to this is that Jeanne Calment smoked for over a hundred years until she passed away at the age of 122. Just because she was active, cognitive, and lived until that ripe old age, I wouldn't recommend that anyone follows her lifestyle choices.
    I would argue being active and cognitive are actually lifestyle choices in and of themselves though if we really wanna keep on this. Maybe you mean ALL of her lifestyle choices.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •