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Thread: The Etymology of Hate

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    The Etymology of Hate

    (So "etymology is perhaps a bad term, but maybe what the word means can shed light on it's origin and social evolution), Why is there so much hate and violence in the world? A tired question, to be sure, but one worth continually seeking answers to, as we have never evolved past brutal violence and hate. Sociology points to the tendency for an "in-group" to assert dominance over an "out group," and the "out-group" revolts against the pressure and ostracism of the "in-group." It's an endless cycle of chest-beating, dominance, assertions of power, demands for recognition.

    Some scholars think, it starts with OWNERSHIP and PRIVILEGE. It began with a notion that we own a certain land, a certain god, certain properties. It evolved with the notion that our kin, biologically linked, or socially linked, also owns and has distinct privilege of a certain material wealth. The idea begins, since everyone has this idea of privilege and ownership, that everyone else wants what "belongs to you." You must defend "it". THEY must defend "it." They are the out-group, you are the in-group. You are the in-group, they are the out-group.

    What, would happen to us, as a race, without corporeal bodies? Without material possessions? Would our disembodied, intellectual forces find new ways of classification, dominance, terror, and discrimination? Is our species flawed to the spiritual core, or is it the physical manifestation of difference that gives shape to our hatred? What do you think? Can we evolve past hate, or is it tied intrinsically with physical being?

    P.S. I don't have the answer, but it pains me.
    Last edited by Rasputina; 08-06-2012 at 04:30 PM.

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    pains me as well .. I think we can evolve, I only hope it's before we blow ourselves up.

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    This is going to sound awful, but I'm around a lot of dogs for work, and I have to be able to read them pretty well or I end up in the ER.

    Human behavior is eerily close to canine behavior.

    I can tell you the two types of dogs that I hate to deal with are the ones that are afraid of me and the ones that were raised without any kind of care or bonding. Both will attack me, given the chance, and I have to decide whether to try to change that with a soft, soothing, reassuring voice or by acting more badass than them. Seems people are a lot like that too.

    That's about all I have to say on the subject (so far), but I'm curious what others have to say.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by RitaRose View Post
    This is going to sound awful, but I'm around a lot of dogs for work, and I have to be able to read them pretty well or I end up in the ER.

    Human behavior is eerily close to canine behavior.

    I can tell you the two types of dogs that I hate to deal with are the ones that are afraid of me and the ones that were raised without any kind of care or bonding. Both will attack me, given the chance, and I have to decide whether to try to change that with a soft, soothing, reassuring voice or by acting more badass than them. Seems people are a lot like that too.

    That's about all I have to say on the subject (so far), but I'm curious what others have to say.
    I is very similar, because humans are animals. I, too, am eager to see whether or not people think that there is a "human principle," a difference, spiritual, biological, intellectual, that separates us from other animals. Does this difference help us or hinder us? Is our capacity for hatred unique, or the natural order of the animal kingdom? Some cite, survival of the fittest, survival of the species, but who can survive, when even the mentally and physically weakest have the ability to annihilate our species?

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    *it

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    Seems like lots of people have what I call *clan mentality* IOW, if you don't belong to my clan, you are to be feared and hated. Could be a instinctive behavior that isn't quite buried yet, could be that *birds of a feather* tend to reinforce each other, especially their insecurities.

    If you recall, Native Americans tribes made war on each other long before Columbus was even born. Same thing in Africa~ So having a common heritage/race is no guarantee of acceptance. Is it human nature?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nady View Post
    Seems like lots of people have what I call *clan mentality* IOW, if you don't belong to my clan, you are to be feared and hated. Could be a instinctive behavior that isn't quite buried yet, could be that *birds of a feather* tend to reinforce each other, especially their insecurities.

    If you recall, Native Americans tribes made war on each other long before Columbus was even born. Same thing in Africa~ So having a common heritage/race is no guarantee of acceptance. Is it human nature?
    Native Americans, as well as Africans, have not been a unified "race" for ages, way before Columbus. They have been separate for aeons, with separate identities, cultures, territories and religious beliefs. These very segregated peoples are indeed a part of the "in-group" vs, "out-group" notion. No one idealizes some happy Eden-land of natives in any academic sociological community. Hatred seems a human condition, but can we evolve past hatred? Or is it intrinsic and somehow connected with the core existence of what it means to be a human?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasputina View Post
    Hatred seems a human condition, but can we evolve past hatred? Or is it intrinsic and somehow connected with the core existence of what it means to be a human?
    I think as individuals we can. As a group? We can make it something punished by being ostracized, but sadly, I believe there will always be people who will hate. Genetic "errors", or even genetic problems with their parents which, in turn, influence their upbringing (trust issues, acceptable behavior, lack of bonding) could all contribute to a person that would be more likely to hate.

    Hell, something like a lack of resources can cause hate, even in a supposedly civilized society like we have now.

    So I just don't see it ever being erased. It's too base of an emotion, and may be even protective when resources are scarce.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by RitaRose View Post
    I think as individuals we can. As a group? We can make it something punished by being ostracized, but sadly, I believe there will always be people who will hate. Genetic "errors", or even genetic problems with their parents which, in turn, influence their upbringing (trust issues, acceptable behavior, lack of bonding) could all contribute to a person that would be more likely to hate.

    Hell, something like a lack of resources can cause hate, even in a supposedly civilized society like we have now.

    So I just don't see it ever being erased. It's too base of an emotion, and may be even protective when resources are scarce.
    Lack of resources have certainly caused wars, recently, many wars. It does all come down to protection of the things that humans materially "own". People, I think, give a cursory thought to the others who suffer at expense of this material ownership, but, like a dog with a bone, we aren't likely to share, or stop fighting for our little scrap. It doesn't occur to the dog, that by keeping the scraps from his fellow, starving dogs, that he might be aiding in the death of his species, but, as humans, certainly we should recognize the folly of selfishness? Maybe we can't see that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasputina View Post
    Lack of resources have certainly caused wars, recently, many wars. It does all come down to protection of the things that humans materially "own". People, I think, give a cursory thought to the others who suffer at expense of this material ownership, but, like a dog with a bone, we aren't likely to share, or stop fighting for our little scrap. It doesn't occur to the dog, that by keeping the scraps from his fellow, starving dogs, that he might be aiding in the death of his species, but, as humans, certainly we should recognize the folly of selfishness? Maybe we can't see that.
    I think many are still too deeply involved in the day to day. The number of people driving expensive cars while in serious debt is proof that not everyone thinks of the impact of their own actions on the future, let alone on a global basis.

    Not to get religious or anything, but some would debate that "selfishness" is the original sin. You're not born angry or sadistic, but a being born with a healthy amount of self-preservation goes a long way toward making it out of infancy.
    My sorely neglected blog - http://ThatWriterBroad.com

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