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Thread: How many cans of tuna . . .? page 5

  1. #41
    Gorbag's Avatar
    Gorbag is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayla2010 View Post
    I feed sardines to my cats occasionally, not sure i could make myself eat them. May try someday though.
    Your cat should at least be very healthy then, right now I am eating a spicy chicken soup made on broth, sardines, spinach, garlic, chili, oregano, lime and of course chicken. Delicious...

  2. #42
    Ayla2010's Avatar
    Ayla2010 is offline Senior Member
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    our pets should be very healthy, they also eat raw meat. Dogs eat raw meaty bones, with some of our leftovers occasionally. No chemicals/vaccines etc either.

    I might try a soup like that, sounds not too bad.

  3. #43
    JoanieL's Avatar
    JoanieL is offline Senior Member
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    I gave up canned tuna when I went primal - actually as I was transitioning into it. I used to eat it as a cheap source of protein - I didn't know from 03/06. By the time I went from the soy contained national brands to the bpa-free lower mercury brands, I watched that cheap source go from about $1.10 a can to about $2.35 a can (5 oz cans). Considering that most (all?) canned tuna is cooked before processing, and even the stuff packed in oil is suspect since most imported olive oil in this country is suspect, I just added it to my processed food list and forgot about it.

    For me it almost always comes down to this: if most Americans eat it on a regular basis, big food has turned it into garbage.

    It's easy enough to google the fish with the highest 03 levels, but pretty much wild salmon, sardines, and mackeral are always on the list. Albacore tuna is nice and fatty, but again, in a can, in my mind has pretty much been cooked to death.

    Shell fish and a lot of white fish are great for protein and some B vitamins, but aren't very fatty. They do taste grand.

    Even fresh tuna from an upscale market is suspect if you don't live close to the coast. I once asked a Market of Choice how often their "fresh sushi grade tuna" was delivered and the answer was twice a week. Ummm. Okay, that's better than canned, but on day three, it ain't fresh. A lower end grocery store had frozen tuna steaks (usually cleaned and frozen while still at sea), and those puppies smelled yummy when defrosted - just like the ocean.

    The bottom line is that in the US, if you want healthy, wholesome food that hasn't been processed to death, you're going to have to work at it or pay through the nose. I hate it, but there it is.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

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    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

  4. #44
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    If you have a local Asian Market, look at their fresh-frozen fish selection. Ours has mussles, oysters, clams, and some I don't recognize.

  5. #45
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    Ayla2010 is offline Senior Member
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    I have been meaning to check out those kinds of shops, ill look next time I am near one.
    I think we are quite lucky here in Aus, so I should be grateful.
    Tuna, toilet paper, butter, cream, and olive oil are the only things I buy at the supermarket. I shop and small farms for meat, eggs, fruit and veg

  6. #46
    Balance's Avatar
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    I think sources make a huge difference when you are choosing between what types of fish to buy. Fish can vary widely in o3/o6 content depending on where they are farmed as well as other fish variety. I think a major factor when deciding which types of fish to consume especially if you are concerned with mercury is the ratio of mercury to selenium. Most fish except the predatory ones have a positive selenium ratio which helps shield you from the mercury contamination. Here is a link to a free podcast done by Chris Kresser with Dr. Ralston a specialist in the field of fish and mercury toxicity just done a few months ago.

    The Truth About Toxic Mercury in Fish
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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