Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: Need Paleo/Primal experts to debunk this crap im hearing/reading PLEASE page 2

  1. #11
    KathyH's Avatar
    KathyH is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    252
    Quote Originally Posted by Rosencrantz1 View Post
    The article you posted raises a concern for me out of the gate because it *seems* like the poster isn't a scientist; the tone of the writing strikes me as someone with an axe to grind or an agenda of some kind. That doesn't mean, either, that he/she is wrong, but what it does make me want to do is look into the studies quoted myself, and see if I draw the same conclusions he does.

    I would recommend following through on the cited sources. For instance, one study the author cites (ref #9 in the article) was pretty heavily analyzed by Denise Minger over at rawfoodsos:

    Brand-Spankin’ New Study: Are Low-Carb Meat Eaters in Trouble? « Raw Food SOS
    Wait, so you would "dismiss" one analysis of one non-scientist or at least you would be skeptical about it but yet would recommend an analysis of another non-scientist? Denise Minger is NOT a scientist, she is an english major, doesn't mean she is wrong but I would recommend drawing your own conclusions or seek conclusions of the scientists in this case than recommending someone to read her analysis as a lot of people take her info at the face value, blindly believing what she says.
    Last edited by KathyH; 07-19-2012 at 05:20 AM.

  2. #12
    Timthetaco's Avatar
    Timthetaco Guest
    I was going to do a long post about one of the references in the article on the testosterone and boners site, but I left the house and never really finished. The link he gave was in regard to a study in mice. That doesn't dismiss it right out of the gate, but context is extremely important when you're looking at that kind of research. They were using mice bred specifically to be a model of heart disease, and then they tested different "chows" to see the effect on their atherosclerosis. I don't know if you've ever looked up the ingredients for your average lab rat chow, but it's not shit I would eat.

    Of course, the guy who wrote that article basically asserted "ate fat got herat disease the end," which is why it's so important to look at the studies themselves, examine their design and decide whether the results they obtained are necessarily relevant not just to human physiology at large, but also your life and your particular diet. Personally, I don't think studies like that are.

    And you didn't provide a reference for the link between animal fats and pancreatitis? If you could, I'd like to look at it. I've never heard of that before.

    I would heed this fantastic advice given a few posts back:

    1) Learn what you can about interpreting/reading scientific studies.

    2) Try to make an assessment if the source you are reading is reputable or not.

  3. #13
    BestBetter's Avatar
    BestBetter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    sunshine state
    Posts
    1,220
    Quote Originally Posted by primal_alex View Post

    Let's speak about a nice "venetian style beef liver", an excellent source of proteins, fats and vitamins. That's worth comparing to a portion of baked potatoes.
    You know, I eat liver because I know how healthy it is, but I would take a white wine/rosemary risotto that my husband cooks (he's from Italy) or one of his pasta dishes (Penne Arrabiata) over liver any day. And even though I'm sure I don't cook my liver anywhere near as good as you (I'll have to look up that Venetian Style Liver recipe, it sounds better than how I cook it!), I'd still prefer a plain baked potato, mashed up with a little salt and pepper. To each his own, I guess!

  4. #14
    primal_alex's Avatar
    primal_alex is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Geneva (Switzerland)
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I'll have to look up that Venetian Style Liver recipe, it sounds better than how I cook it!
    (sorry the website is in Italian): Ricetta Fegato alla veneziana - Le Ricette di GialloZafferano.it

    You can also make a great risotto with rabbit or chicken liver. Me too (like most people I guess) cannot eat liver all alone as if it were a steak. But maybe this should go under the recipes thread.

  5. #15
    BestBetter's Avatar
    BestBetter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    sunshine state
    Posts
    1,220
    Quote Originally Posted by primal_alex View Post
    (sorry the website is in Italian): Ricetta Fegato alla veneziana - Le Ricette di GialloZafferano.it

    You can also make a great risotto with rabbit or chicken liver. Me too (like most people I guess) cannot eat liver all alone as if it were a steak. But maybe this should go under the recipes thread.
    Thanks! I just made my husband interpret it, and it seems like it's the same way I currently cook liver, only I don't use vinegar. I wonder if that makes a big difference?
    Last edited by BestBetter; 07-19-2012 at 09:22 AM.

  6. #16
    Rosencrantz1's Avatar
    Rosencrantz1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    NYC area
    Posts
    127
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Quote Originally Posted by KathyH View Post
    Wait, so you would "dismiss" one analysis of one non-scientist or at least you would be skeptical about it but yet would recommend an analysis of another non-scientist? Denise Minger is NOT a scientist, she is an english major, doesn't mean she is wrong but I would recommend drawing your own conclusions or seek conclusions of the scientists in this case than recommending someone to read her analysis as a lot of people take her info at the face value, blindly believing what she says.
    KathyH, a very good point. I actually did not intend to imply "Denise is right, this other dude is wrong," though I can certainly see why my post would lead you to that conclusion. I actually just meant to point out that different people - be they scientists or no - interpret the same scientific studies differently. I would say, though, that the two authors took different approaches in responding to the cited study. The original author cited the study, said "Hey, this shows x and y," while Denise took the time go through it piece by piece and point what she found poor or inconsistent with it. I'm not coming down in favor, necessarily, of either interpretation in this particular case, just wanted to highlight the way different people look at the same piece of data.

    And I agree with you wholeheartedly: that we, as consumers of this information, need to work on being as educated and well-informed as possible, and then draw our own conclusions. One piece of that, of course, is finding sources that we feel are trustworthy and reputable. We won't always be correct when we make those assessments, I suppose, but I think there is value in finding "experts" we feel we can have faith in.
    “If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people together to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea” -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •