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Thread: Gardening, again... page 3

  1. #21
    aix_sponsa's Avatar
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neckhammer View Post
    My garden this year was completely free form and I loved it (beens, peppers, tomatoes, squash, and second round of carrots, radishes, broccoli coming in now)! All the different stuff just intermingled and working togeather. No rows....and best of all NO WEEDS! Dense planting with various vegetables is an awesome way to reduce disease and weeds while also making the absolute best use of a small space IMO. I'm no advanced gardener (only about 6-7 years doing it), but I love this style. I even planted some fruit trees and berry shrubs for some long term turn out. Can't wait to see what that brings!
    What kind of consistency do you have?

    One thing I've noticed with some growing methods is that there can be huge variations in yield and quality. I've tried a lot of different styles, from permaculture, bio-intensive, square foot, Steve Solomon, John Jeavons, Eliott Coleman, Helen & Scott Nearing, one straw revolution, etc. and no one method is a sure thing when your household depends on what you grow for food.

    Having a big menu of methods to use for a wide variety of growing situations is a great idea. Some years, or some crops, one method may work better than another. But you should always be ready to learn and experiment and be flexible.

    I have to admit being pretty happy to have all the elbow room I need to grow, after trying the small-scale ways. I use composted manure and nettle tea to feed the plants, and they usually grow happily. So do the weeds, but our crazy dark & wet weather doesn't help with that. We are using sheets of black visqueen to kill sod, then we till it, cover it, and till a few more times. Eventually the weed seeds all germinate, and we can plant. It's an investment, but we're going to be here a long time.

    We're also getting ready to use our horse for farm work, so we need a certain amount of spacing. It's all a learning curve...
    Seven Trees Farm - diversified subsistence farming on 1.25 acres.

  3. #23
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    Yes, we have black plastic all over the place this year since we are working this land for the first time this year and are starting from grass and the weeds that grow in it including a lot of thistle. We do have a lot of nettles and will be trying nettle tea soon.

  4. #24
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    Berries are just coming in here, and despite the ravages of North Americain native currant fruit fly (I hate it!) we are getting lovely bunch of berries every day. Carrots, herbs, and beets are all from the garden now too, and peas.... Not to mention fresh flowers.

    Everybody keeps telling me how hard gardening is and how much work, but I don't mind it, and even though I do drop the ball when I am busy, I enjoy raising my garden. There is just something so good about spending half an hour or so in the yard after work picking berries, herbs and other stuff for the supper table....

    In a few years my trees will be fruiting too, and I am hoping that putting plastic down will give me better crops from my currants.
    Last edited by Leida; 07-30-2012 at 09:56 AM.
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  5. #25
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    What a bunch of great ideas, thanks! Now all we need is RAIN!!
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    Still Craving Pterodactyl--my Primal Blueprint blog

    70 is the new 50--without the hot flashes!

    Goals: Feel good, be stronger, and hopefully kick that arthritis in the backside! Oh, yeah, and losing more weight would be okay, too.

  6. #26
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    Wow, I guess the season is officially over for us--hard frost last night! I collected a big basket of mostly green tomatoes, mostly small Romas--and will be making green tomato relish or chutney. I fried two of the bigger ones with dinner tonight (YUM. Arrowroot starch does just fine for "breading"), and have two more to do. There was one pepper big enough to use normally, and several to slip into the relish...and one little stunted cucumber. The cabbage never did anything, and the squash died a horrible death weeks ago, thanks to squash borers...but we loved them while we had them. What a great experiment this has been!
    Best--
    Kate

    Still Craving Pterodactyl--my Primal Blueprint blog

    70 is the new 50--without the hot flashes!

    Goals: Feel good, be stronger, and hopefully kick that arthritis in the backside! Oh, yeah, and losing more weight would be okay, too.

  7. #27
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    We have just put in 2 3x7 raised beds to get our feet wet. We have done similar scale raised beds in the distant past so this seemed a good restart for us. Altogether we have 1.2 acres, about half wooded, so I'd like to expand as we get our garden legs. There are a lot of wild raspberries along the woods at our property line and plenty of places good for blueberries, figs, some fruit trees and a lot more vegetables. I would like to plant some pawpaw as they are native to our area and can't be had commercially.

    Kate, do you think arrowroot would work for a tempura-style batter?
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraSB View Post
    We have just put in 2 3x7 raised beds to get our feet wet. We have done similar scale raised beds in the distant past so this seemed a good restart for us. Altogether we have 1.2 acres, about half wooded, so I'd like to expand as we get our garden legs. There are a lot of wild raspberries along the woods at our property line and plenty of places good for blueberries, figs, some fruit trees and a lot more vegetables. I would like to plant some pawpaw as they are native to our area and can't be had commercially.

    Kate, do you think arrowroot would work for a tempura-style batter?
    I think it would work fine, Laura! I'm probably going to try it...I was very pleased with the result tonight.
    Best--
    Kate

    Still Craving Pterodactyl--my Primal Blueprint blog

    70 is the new 50--without the hot flashes!

    Goals: Feel good, be stronger, and hopefully kick that arthritis in the backside! Oh, yeah, and losing more weight would be okay, too.

  9. #29
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    Man, you guys make me super jealous. I have only my balcony garden (pics in my signature link), so growing enough food for more than a small salad is a bit out the question! I do have quite a few herbs though, and sitting amongst my greenery while I cross stitch makes me happy
    The Paleo Strongwoman - A site dedicated to strength, and feeding strength.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kate Ruckman View Post
    I think it would work fine, Laura! I'm probably going to try it...I was very pleased with the result tonight.
    OK then! I just watched Anne Burrell make cheese stuffed, fried zucchini blossoms. In addition to looking really cool and tasty, I thought it would be a great way to keep the zucchini crop to a manageable level.
    50yo, 5'3"
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    CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
    GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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