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    JoanieL's Avatar
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    Question Why is cheese not primal?

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    I was wondering, since it's such an old food, why cheese isn't primal?

    I don't mean the slices or blocks of beige and yellow that are sold in most large grocery stores - I get that totally. I'm wondering about the cheeses that come from goats and sheep (probably no hormones and are grass fed) and from family farms.

    If there's a link to this answer that I've missed, my apologies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I was wondering, since it's such an old food, why cheese isn't primal?

    I don't mean the slices or blocks of beige and yellow that are sold in most large grocery stores - I get that totally. I'm wondering about the cheeses that come from goats and sheep (probably no hormones and are grass fed) and from family farms.

    If there's a link to this answer that I've missed, my apologies.
    It's not paleo simply because cavemen didn't eat it. But it's not unhealthy and maybe even healthy, it's a little of an empty calorie food though. Mark considers it primal
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    High quality cheese (especially raw cheese) is Primal, but it's not Paleo.
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    Primal vs paleo. What are the most differences significant differences? Does this pretty much cover it?

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/whats...#axzz20XofgWGS
    Last edited by Artbuc; 07-14-2012 at 08:20 AM.

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    Is that the origin of ass cheese?

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    Thank you for your answers and the link!

    Fortunately I did not have a mouthful of coffee when I read about the origins of ass cheese.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadsie View Post
    It's not paleo simply because cavemen didn't eat it. But it's not unhealthy and maybe even healthy, it's a little of an empty calorie food though. Mark considers it primal
    How in the hell could mammalian milk be an empty calorie food?

    It should be obvious that the opposite is the case, as baby mammals are growing.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    Graycat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleo-bunny View Post
    How in the hell could mammalian milk be an empty calorie food?

    It should be obvious that the opposite is the case, as baby mammals are growing.
    I don't know about "empty" per ce, but it's definitely calorie dense and easy to overeat. Cheese and nuts have always been the foods that have stalled my Primal weight loss efforts.

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    Agreed cheese and butter are calorie dense.

    My point was about empty calories, as in low micronutrient density. i.e. fewer micronutrients per calorie.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    Lewis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanieL View Post
    I was wondering, since it's such an old food, why cheese isn't primal?

    I don't mean the slices or blocks of beige and yellow that are sold in most large grocery stores - I get that totally. I'm wondering about the cheeses that come from goats and sheep (probably no hormones and are grass fed) and from family farms.
    it's a horrifically complex answer, and in truth all you've really got are people's best guesses.

    If there's a link to this answer that I've missed, my apologies.
    There is. It's got to off the main page under the menu item "primal 101". Here it is:

    The Definitive Guide to Dairy | Mark's Daily Apple

    The short answer is that if it's well-aged cheese and from goats or sheep that haven't been intensively reared, then it's about the best form you could get dairy in. If you're not sensitive to casein, or any other component in milk, then a piece now and then would be a fairly nutritious, and at any rate harmless, addition to the diet.

    You're in the U.S. aren't you? Says so in the top right of your post.

    Here is what I would do if I were, and if I had the spare cash. I would use the service at Cyrex Labs to check whether I was gluten- (and in general wheat-) sensitive or not (Array Number 3). If it turned out that I was I would then have my blood checked against their "Array Number 4" (Cross-reactive foods.)

    Cyrex Tests & Arrays

    It seems to be a particular form of β-casein in some types of cow's milk that's particularly problematic:

    Beta-casein

    And this is why sheeps or goats cheese would be a better choice.

    However, as I understand it casein is pretty similar in configuration to gluten and the body can "mistake" the one for the other. This is what Cyrex mean by a "cross-reactive" food. Casein is one of the most commonly cross-reactive foods to gluten. Quite honestly, if I were gluten-sensitive and was shown to be getting a cross-reaction to casein then I'd leave all dairy products well alone. Because, if I were in that position and didn't, every time I ate some I'd be provoking a immune-reaction to it. You can have silent and long-term damage from that that you don't know about till years later.

    But if you're not sensitive to casein, or don't have a gluten cross-reaction to it, then your goat's cheese is a good food.

    I suppose one day all doctors will be screening their patients for this kind of thing. At the moment it seems to be in its infancy, and I don't think it's cheap.
    Last edited by Lewis; 07-14-2012 at 11:06 AM. Reason: spelling

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