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    cavequeen's Avatar
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    Mom of teen boys

    Primal Fuel
    I'm not sure where to post this thread but this section seems the most logical.

    I've always had got luck with LC as had my DH. We both have a lot of native american heritage and family history of diabetes. I've had problems with high blood pressure whenever I gain weight so I am determined to lose 20 lbs (though 35 lbs would probably be better) again and keep it off. Primal seems a perfect lifestyle for me. I have given up grains, not a big deal with my history of LC and have greatly cut down dairy, just fage yogurt, occasional cream and hard cheese. Power yoga, interval cardio running, swimming is about all I have they energy to do now. So far it's working well for me!

    Luckily with my three boys we have always emphasized meat, fruit, and veggies and some grains, mainly at breakfast like oatmeal. We never have kept sodas in the house or juice. Only water and milk (and unsweetened tea and coffee for the adults) They have never been overweight in their life and are very physically active with martial arts with my DH and lots of conditioning training there and have spent time outside every week doing yard work, swimming in the pool.

    Here is the diet, I am thinking of for them. I have two boys in early teens and 8 year old.

    Breakfast- eggs and some protein, bacon, or sausage. With a protein smoothie made with half almond milk/coconut milk, protein powder, berries/banana, almond butter, and spinach. I'm going to add some cod liver oil just because we don't eat very much fish and we do have 1 teen with mild ADHD and constipation and the other teen with mild skin issues so I think they would benefit. They like this breakfast in fact it's their preferred one.

    Lunch- I will pack for my 8 year old just because he doesn't do well on school lunches and prefers his own lunch anyway. I will probably make for him similar to what I pack for myself though he is picky and I will have to get his input. Teens will probably buy at school. They enjoy buying and it is too hard with their schedule to go back to their locker to get a lunch. They don't carry backpacks and only have 4 mins to get there. Plus, I will never convince them since they are not overweight.

    Dinner- Will most likely be whatever I am fixing that's more primal. Is there a bread product that's better for them if they do hound for one since they aren't doing primal? Corn bread maybe? I know I can add rice or potatoes for them as well.

    evening snack- I have some pineapple frozen greek yogurt that they like with some local honey that doesn't seem to set off cravings for them so I will probably keep giving them that. In addition to some natural calm magnesium to try to help them sleep and ward off constipation for my one son.

    I'm not sure about daily multivitamins/calcium since they are going through growth spurts? The cod liver will have the vitamin D and omega 3's and the magnesium at night. Currently I am giving just regular kids multivitamin but I am not sure about calcium since the teens are growing right now and we are trying to limit milk to 1 glass a day as we keep running out of milk (my 8 year old especially tends to overdrink milk)

    Another factor is expense. Frankly the cost of feeding 5 people is hugely expensive not to mention other expensive that we have like their cell phones which are necessary with both my DH and I working and their fees for martial arts. We are going to have to probably supplement with at least some grains for them just to fill them up. We try to buy meat when on sale and just stick it in the freezer and eat right away for the moment. The plan in the fall when we have more money is to buy a freezer and buy some local grass fed beef which we have a contact and probably split with my mil who is interested as well. But still I am spending way too much on groceries. I have noticed the increase in price just for myself eating more primal and I can imagine if I do it for the rest of the family as well.

    Any tips from parents of teens? Sorry for the length. I am new to primal eating and this website. Any links to thread that talk about budget and family meal planning appreciated. I haven't found them yet though I am trying to search different topics.

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    I should also add that one thing I do to stretch the grocery budget is to cook dried beans and added some rice, veggies and protein to it. Maybe once a week to eat for my DH and kids. I don't do this myself since I am the one with high blood pressure and overweight but since the rest of the family is not primal, I figure it is better than grains? Cheaper anyway.

    Edited- I did find a couple of threads on feeding a large family. So tips I have found for budgeting. I may add to this list as I find tips.

    1. Buy meat on sale doesn't have to be the more expensive grass fed. (I do this already and have for years but I do need to investigate cheaper meats, I love my crockpot anyway as it is easier to throw in before heading to work. Bacon may be too expensive unless it's b1 get 1 free like we found recently.)
    2. Supplement with rice, potatoes, and dried beans which aren't as primal but better than other starchs and probably cheaper.
    3. Eat more eggs as they are cheaper and good source of protein.
    4. Buy fruit and veggies that are on sale especially seasonal ones. (This month I have found a lot of buy 1 get 1 frees with spinach. )
    5. I also may cut back on milk as a cost cutting measure. They way overdrink it. Since they won't be eating as much cereal, they won't need it anyway. They can drink more water.
    Last edited by cavequeen; 07-06-2012 at 12:35 PM.

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    Your answer is eggs. Lots and lots of eggs. Cheaper than meat, but a good dose of protein and fat, and some good vitamins.

    Speaking of vitamins, can you get them eating offal? Cheap and full of goodness. Start with steak and kidney and move through hearts to liver.

    Packed lunches: sandwiches with peppers instead of bread? Didn't someone post a link about that somewhere?

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    One thing to remember is that primal does not equal low-carb for everyone. Primal is grain free not carbohydrate free. There is no reason to limit to carbohydrates for active, growing, normal weight people. Let them eat all the fruit, rice and potatoes they want with their otherwise primal meals.
    Sandra
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    There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

    DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

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    Have you done any reading on a Weston A Price style diet? It is pretty close to what you are doing - emphasis on adding in lots of nutrient dense foods and then on limiting any damage from less paleo foods. So grains and beans are soaked to reduce anti-nutrients. I followed the diet for a few years before finding primal. I feel better eating primal, but if I had children I would feed the WAP diet (keeping grains on the lower end of the consumption).

    There is a great book on this called Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by orielwen View Post
    Your answer is eggs. Lots and lots of eggs. Cheaper than meat, but a good dose of protein and fat, and some good vitamins.

    Speaking of vitamins, can you get them eating offal? Cheap and full of goodness. Start with steak and kidney and move through hearts to liver.

    Packed lunches: sandwiches with peppers instead of bread? Didn't someone post a link about that somewhere?
    We all can't stand liver! lol It makes me gag as does some fish. Though I am trying to overcome the fish one, by eating more tuna and tilipia which seem okay for me. My DH is in charge of cooking fish and getting my kids to like fish. He cooks salmon and other cheaper fish for them sometimes and they seem to like sardines and tuna. He hasn't done that in a while though I will have to remind him. Definitely worth thinking about though.

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    Growing children should not be put on a restricted diet unless there are specific issues. Definitely get your 8 yo's input on his lunches. You could try a bento lunch box and help him choose what goes in each area every day - protein, veggies, fruits, etc. That's my plan once my kids start school. You need to be sure that your growing children are getting plenty of carbs - potatoes, rice, squash. Another important thing will be to NOT limit how much they eat. Keep the junk food out of the house, except on occasion so they don't gorge, and let them eat their fill of healthy foods. We've found some great gluten-free brownies that the kids and DH love (Bob's Red Mill) that I will make once every couple months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jammies View Post
    Have you done any reading on a Weston A Price style diet? It is pretty close to what you are doing - emphasis on adding in lots of nutrient dense foods and then on limiting any damage from less paleo foods. So grains and beans are soaked to reduce anti-nutrients. I followed the diet for a few years before finding primal. I feel better eating primal, but if I had children I would feed the WAP diet (keeping grains on the lower end of the consumption).

    There is a great book on this called Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.
    Thanks! I will definitely read it when I get some money. I am a book worm and love to read and research and I am off this summer as a work for a school district. I am over my budget this month in books though because I read "Why we get fat", "Primal Blueprint" and "Paleo Answer". I loved them though! Edited- I did find a website called the nourishing cook which is cooking through all the recipes. So I will look through those recipes till I can read the book.

    I have always bought dried beans anyway because I am sensitive to salt with my high blood pressure and they say to soak them so I have always soaked them overnight and then thrown them in the crockpot before work the next morning. I just want to feed them the best nourishing good I can. But, it's hard during the school year because we are so busy as I work full time, my DH travels more and the kids do more afterschool activities in addition to their martial arts. I had to start cooking food or at least starting it the night before and/or using a crockpot so we can just warm up most of the time.
    Last edited by cavequeen; 07-06-2012 at 01:35 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by teach2183 View Post
    Growing children should not be put on a restricted diet unless there are specific issues. Definitely get your 8 yo's input on his lunches. You could try a bento lunch box and help him choose what goes in each area every day - protein, veggies, fruits, etc. That's my plan once my kids start school. You need to be sure that your growing children are getting plenty of carbs - potatoes, rice, squash. Another important thing will be to NOT limit how much they eat. Keep the junk food out of the house, except on occasion so they don't gorge, and let them eat their fill of healthy foods. We've found some great gluten-free brownies that the kids and DH love (Bob's Red Mill) that I will make once every couple months.
    Thanks for the brownies recommendation sounds good! I love brownies, it's a weakness. lol We have never limited carbs for the kids though know I think about it we haven't cooked as much potatoes and sweet potatoes as much (though we still do cook it) for them on the times my DH and myself have gone low carb so I will offer that more instead of bread. They get rice at least 1 or 2 a week anyway probably offer it more if we are cutting back on grains. They hate squash with a burning passion at least summer squash. I'm not sure why my DH and myself love it! They like spinach, tomatoes, bell peppers, okra, asparagus etc. They might start eating it and acorn squash if I cook it with more butter and maybe a bit of local honey.

    My 8 year old doesn't give me a choice on lunches! lol He's kind of bossy and mature for his age so I always have to negotiate with him for lunches. He eats well for other meals though. I do need to buy a bento type lunch box though right now he has the Avengers!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cavequeen View Post
    Thanks! I will definitely read it when I get some money. I am a book worm and love to read and research and I am off this summer as a work for a school district. I am over my budget this month in books though because I read "Why we get fat", "Primal Blueprint" and "Paleo Answer". I loved them though!

    I have always bought dried beans anyway because I am sensitive to salt with my high blood pressure and they say to soak them so I have always soaked them overnight and then thrown them in the crockpot before work the next morning. I just want to feed them the best nourishing good I can. But, it's hard during the school year because we are so busy as I work full time, my DH travels more and the kids do more afterschool activities in addition to their martial arts. I had to start cooking food or at least starting it the night before and/or using a crockpot so we can just warm up most of the time.
    I got nourishing traditions from my local library - so you may want to try that. You can also get some info from the WAP website: The Weston A. Price Foundation - Weston A Price Foundation

    As far as beans, I think that it is recommended they be soaked, then boiled for at least 15 minutes, and then simmered until soft to destroy the anti-nutrients.

    Either way, just the fact that your kids aren't getting fed a standard american diet filled with transfats, high fructose corn syrup, crappy oils and highly refined grains and filled with healthy fats, meats, fruits and veggies puts them a million miles ahead of where most kids are. If you need to keep a few pots of lentil soup or curried chickpeas on the menu to make it work I wouldn't feel one bit bad about that!
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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