Page 29 of 343 FirstFirst ... 1927282930313979129 ... LastLast
Results 281 to 290 of 3428

Thread: waiting for the whoosh - badgergirl's journal page 29

  1. #281
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,245
    Primal Fuel
    Quote Originally Posted by ssn679doc View Post
    Wait.... It ISN'T pronunced that way??? Well cut my legs off and call me Shorty!
    !

    You will get this... My mom is a German immigrant to the US with no discernible German accent, my dad is a Jersey boy born and raised, I spent my time in Killeen TX, and when my dad finally got transferred out of Texas to go back overseas, we went to visit the family in Jersey before we boarded the plane - and my never-ever-left-New Jersey-once grandma decided to give ME elocution lessons!
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  2. #282
    ssn679doc's Avatar
    ssn679doc is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,864
    Quote Originally Posted by Crabbcakes View Post
    !

    You will get this...
    You sir, give me FAR too much credit!!! lol In truth I do. I left Home in 1968.... I've been gone longer than I lived there and have been gone sooooo long that you can't tell where I come from, but let me spend 10 minutes with Texans, and you'd think I never left....

  3. #283
    badgergirl's Avatar
    badgergirl is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,203
    Quote Originally Posted by Crabbcakes View Post
    is Small Boy sporting an English accent from his parents or an Aussie one from his environment?
    Small boy will proudly tell you he is 'English and Oztrayalien'. Small children always seem to have more of an accent than the adults in their community, no? Perhaps it's because they are still learning, but the key markers of any accent seem more pronounced in the youngsters.

    Actually, only one of small boy's parents is English - me, obvs - but his father's accent is very soft and we do listen to a lot of English voices (story dramatisations and Radio 4). Small boy has slightly less of an ocker accent than his fellow five year olds, but the difference is probably only something a parent's ear would pick up.

    He's probably the only five year old who gets asked 'is that a statement or a question?' every time he finishes what he says with a rising intonation. I CANNOT ABIDE Australian question intonation and make every effort to stamp it out.

    What we have noticed most is that creche and kinder are staffed, not exclusively, but enough for us to be able to hear it in small boy's vocabulary, with young and, sad to say, poorly educated women. It seems that somewhere along the line girls with low ambition/intellect/self-esteem choose one of two routes: childcare or beauty. When we moved small boy from creche to kinder I was happy to note that the room leaders were older (30s-40s rather than 19-25) and had a bit about them.

    I fully expect his accent to change again when he starts school - next week! - and he is exposed to new voices. His teachers are drawn from many nationalities and perhaps there will be a wider variety in the students too.

    As for my accent, it is very different to my parents' (actually, they have different accents to each other - mum has cockney/Irish undertones [fi-lim, for example] and my father has a gentle oyle o' wight accent, rare these days) and brother's (generic country/southern English - a bit like Stephen Merchant only nowhere near as communicative). I suspect I am beginning to pick up Australian turns of phrase if not the whole accent-vocabulary-intonation shebang.
    Last edited by badgergirl; 01-24-2013 at 01:26 PM.
    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60211.html Into RPG table top games? Check out FateStorm and (in development) Vanguard!

  4. #284
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,245
    Just looked up your links - interesting. I did the same thing with my older two in New Jersey - to make an accent situation worse, we had neighbors on the one side from Staten Island, and neighbors on the other from Brooklyn, all while living in the thick of the Garden State. My girls had regular speech lessons, which my well-spoken and solidly Midwestern in-laws were only too happy to help provide during visits.

    Now I have the same situation, just country-fried. You would not believe the twang and bad basic grammar out here! I have absolutely nothing against local accent color in a voice, just because people really can't help it, but when a strong accent is coupled with ungrammatical speech at all times??! NOOO

    At this point, my girls may add a little local color here and there, accent and/or vocabulary, for some fun, but their default speech is and will be (if I am alive to say anything about it) educated, grammatical, non-nasal, well-modulated Midwestern. My niece and nephews out here have grown up with the local speech, and they are not capable of ramping up their game when needed. I see that as a future handicap - it is why I pushed so hard in New Jersey, not because there is anything inherently wrong with being instantly pegged as a kid from "Joisey" by the accent, but because the one-two combo of strong accent and whatever grammatical foolishness is endemic to any place isn't the best first impression in general. Same goes for my current neck of the woods. I have a habit of saying "crick" at home in casual conversation, but I can turn that particular button on and off in public, and therein lies my litmus test.

    You are right to watch his speech at this age - if left completely alone, those habits are almost impossible to root out.
    Last edited by Crabbcakes; 01-24-2013 at 01:45 PM.
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  5. #285
    badgergirl's Avatar
    badgergirl is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,203
    I can speak oyle o'wight when I want to and there are some verbal quirks that I enjoy (somewhen) while others ("I was" + "gerund") that are the very devil. I've taught myself to say either as ay-ther instead of ee-ther, but my father thinks I'm a traitor and a terrible snob. However, as I drill into the small boy, language matters and learning to speak well is very important.

    I (proud parent alert) am constantly impressed by small boy's vocabulary. Truly, he speaks with a range and sophistication that astonishes me. I put this down to the sheer number of books we read and the amount of time husband spends chatting to small boy.

    School is going to be totally amazing...
    Here are the edited highlights from the welcome email the head sent out:
    Hi everyone,

    Candlebark is beginning its eighth year, with record enrolments, and daily enquiries for places. However, for the time being, I am capping numbers at 130, until we see how that dynamic works. Although we have permission to go to 196, it wouldn't surprise me if somewhere around 130 proves to be about the right number for us.

    I'm feeling very warmed up for an exciting year, although to be honest right now I'm slightly jetlagged, having flown from Uganda to Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur to Melbourne last weekend… a circuitous route indeed. I was doing workshops in schools in Kenya and Uganda all last week, with teachers and students, and had some eye opening, even eye-popping, experiences.
    I’ve come back more convinced than ever that we’re taking the right path in the way we approach education here at C’bark. But we keep looking to reinvent ourselves, and to that end the 2013 teachers will gather here tomorrow to spend the day with the guy who is probably Australia's leading authority on technology and education. Mark Sparvell, after winning the Asia-Pacific title as Microsoft's 2009 Most Innovative Teacher went on to Brazil, where he subsequently won the world title! He has been principal at Kadina Primary School in South Australia, where one of his projects was to connect six schools over 5000km across three states in Australia so that they could "think out loud together". Mark facilitated via a live video feed, while the students brainstormed on a virtual whiteboard, asked questions by webcam and debated topics such as the meaning of a fair go.
    Working in a district capacity, Mark also invited students across different age groups and school systems to explore values and environmental projects in a virtual community of up to 30 sites. In his quest to explore the possibilities of technology in education, Mark’s credo is that he is willing to "fail early and fail often". And he's met some tricky technical challenges, like leading a lesson that connected students and teachers on boats near Kangaroo Island via a video link-up to experts on the mainland. Students at more than 20 remote locations joined in, asking questions about dolphins and whales that were answered on the spot.
    Mark says. "Whether it's on the back of a boat or in a remote community, my classroom is wherever my laptop is." Mark has also incorporated Nintendo DS’s, iTouch and netbooks into learning experiences.
    Mark is also a strong believer in values-based education, and has coordinated National values education projects. He currently works for Principals Australia, as an executive consultant in IT and innovation. He frequently travels around Australia and overseas to present at conferences, and we are very fortunate to have him spending the day with our staff.
    As always, there are plenty of exciting new things to see and experience at Candlebark this year. Definitely the most exciting is the acquisition of our own fire engine, which will help us deal quickly with any spot fires. Almost as exciting is the line-up of new staff. Of course, two of them are far from new: Sarita Ryan and Wendy Wright have both taught here before, with great success. They left for the best of reasons, because they wanted further adventures! Sarita went to Finland to study for her Master's degree, in the course of which she did a good deal of work in Africa for several international agencies. Sarita now has a Master’s degree in Education (specialisation in Development and International Cooperation) from the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.

    Wendy and her husband Ross went to Fiji, to teach in an international school.

    Sarita will be taking on a new role here, as Primary Coordinator. Although your first `port-of-call’ will still be the class co-ordinator, please feel free to include Sarita in discussions of any queries, concerns or issues regarding children in primary grades at Candlebark. I'll send the list of class coordinators for 2013 out next week.
    Wendy will be primarily responsible for the Prep grade in 2013.
    Also joining us is, as I mentioned in an e-mail late last year, Terry Willis , who in a previous life was a Props Master who worked on the sets of such film and television productions as Ned Kelly, Big Brother and Neighbours. Terry is a keen cyclist, kayaker, surfer, and a passionate gardener. Terry will be here two days a week, teaching Manual Arts, including metalwork and woodwork, to students from grade 4 upwards (not grade 5, as previously advertised). Each of these students will do Manual Arts for two or three terms a year, using the area next to the art room, which has been converted by Bob over the Christmas holidays into a nice big space perfect for Manual Arts and Art.
    In order to incorporate Manual Arts, there will be a reduction in the amount of Art, classroom music and dance for students from grade 4 upwards. In future, these students will have the subjects for two or three terms a year instead of four. We'll review the situation again at the end of 2013, to see how it has worked.
    As most of you know, Lizanne Richards left Candlebark at the end of 2012 to prepare for the birth of her and Tim's first child. I'm delighted to say that the happy event took place without a hitch just two days ago, when Lizanne gave birth to Amelia Constance Richards, just forty-five minutes after the hour drive to Sunshine Hospital. Amelia weighed in at 8 pounds (3.66kg) with a head full of red hair, and mother and daughter are both well. I've had no report on the father's condition.

    Teaching singing in first term, in Lizanne's place, is Heather Stewart , a vocalist, violinist, teacher and researcher, who has her bachelor of music degree (with honours), is a Master of Arts, has a graduate diploma in teaching, and her AmusA. Heather spent a day here last year, and delighted the students with her zest, humour and musicality.

    We also welcome our first native-born French teacher: Steve Pollett. Steve may not seem like a typical French name, but his parents named him after Steve McQueen! Steve grew up in Lille, and gained degrees in environmental science, landscape design, and education from Lille University. Among Steve's other experiences are working as human resources consultant for the industry and commerce chamber of Lille, where he specialised in inducting and training young apprentices for companies, teaching French and science in a primary school in Togo, West Africa, working for Green Made Easy in Melbourne last year, and organising and running science and sport activities for children aged 5 to 15 in Montréal. He has also taught school groups how to grow plants and how to increase biodiversity in an urban area, in a program aimed at cultivating social cohesion in disadvantaged neighbourhoods by gardening. He has designed, made and marketed a collection of leathergoods and accessories, been involved in the restoration of historic buildings in Denmark and Sweden, is a passionate cyclist, and enjoys hiking, camping, gardening, paragliding and playing the flute.

    In 2013 we are expanding the French program so that it will now begin in Grade 2, with two lessons a week for all classes.

    2013 is also exciting for us because it is the first time we have offered Year 10. Although we have only a small group, we are hoping to build on this start in years to come, as it has become obvious over the years that the transition to other schools is likely to be much more manageable and effective if it takes place from Candlebark at the end of Year 10.

    John
    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60211.html Into RPG table top games? Check out FateStorm and (in development) Vanguard!

  6. #286
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,245
    Sounds like an interesting place! And nary a mention of testing scores and/or how many kids get into Harvard.

    Just "real" people for teachers, qualified to impart the subject matter they are entrusted to teach, accessible to parents, with active lives, open to future learning in all its forms. I would be excited as well!
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  7. #287
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,245
    Quote Originally Posted by badgergirl View Post
    I can speak oyle o'wight when I want to and there are some verbal quirks that I enjoy (somewhen) while others ("I was" + "gerund") that are the very devil. I've taught myself to say either as ay-ther instead of ee-ther, but my father thinks I'm a traitor and a terrible snob.
    I get the feeling that there is still a lot of class-based stuff going on in England. Not that it isn't happening here, but nobody ever called me a "snob" for switching between ay-ther and ee-ther.

    Some of the Brits on the forum were discussing a long while ago how even food choices can label you as a snob; for instance, if you wish to upgrade quality after a childhood of eating low-quality foodstuffs, the "lower-class" folk start making fun of you, or become angry.

    The last thing I personally heard in my own circle of friends was a slur against a young white, middle-class male who looked exactly to me as if he were growing matted blonde dreadlocks. He got called a "wigger" behind his back. I didn't know what it meant, and was told it meant "wannabe nigger". Not nice at all, and racist to boot.
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  8. #288
    badgergirl's Avatar
    badgergirl is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,203
    Yes. Is the short answer... Class matters in many and varied ways. And it's a mistake to think that there are only three classes - there are multitudes of sub divisions! I'm the product of a middle class (by way of the military) grandfather who married beneath him (there was something of the camp follower to by maternal grandmother, not quite that bad, but not far from it), my mother was the dim middle child and, whereas her two sisters climbed back into the middle class by way of education, my mother married a tradesman. My father's family were poor and very, very working class. My parents have slightly conflicting value systems/assumptions about education and work. My brother and I are both middle class (by way of higher education), but there are considerable distinctions between us - not least that he married a working-class spouse whereas I married into a middle class (albeit Australian and by education, not money) family.

    My dad often says things like 'I often wonder if your brother would have been happier on the [work]shop floor, rather than stuck in an office' er, no, Dad. He'd have hated the shop floor. Dad rather wishes I'd stayed on the Isle and got myself a nice little job in the supermarket. That said, he's very supportive and proud of us - he just doesn't understand us (me especially) as our aspirations and frames of reference are beyond his ken.

    B: yoghurt (YUM!)
    L: crudites and two teaspoons of dip - pesto and sweet potato with basil
    D: lamb yellow thai curry with broc and carrots (not a success - husband is much better at korma)
    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60211.html Into RPG table top games? Check out FateStorm and (in development) Vanguard!

  9. #289
    Crabbcakes's Avatar
    Crabbcakes is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    2,245
    Ohhhh, this is sounding familiar in some ways... My pop is as low-working-class as they come, half of the time on the government dole, and has zero appreciation for a college education. He says all it is is "book learning", that those types can do nothing real and practical, that mostly their lives aren't grounded in what he terms "real life". Totally pissed off that I never followed his advice to become a beehive-sporting, stiletto-wearing, pancake make-upped secretary for someone he can brag about straight out of high school. As in "my daughter works for the CEO of NASCAR", which is a company that carries a lot of clout in that world, or as in a spiffy location, such as "my daughter works at the World Trade Center", which I actually did, which also carries weight in his world because it is a world-recognized location. My answer to that has always been "so did all the janitors there". Pop is a high school dropout who did his equivalency GED when I was old enough to remember, and went to the Army for direction in his life very early. He is also an open racist, a male chauvinist, a narcissist, anything flashy-pseudo-patriotic is his politics of the hour, even though he says God doesn't exist thinks he has the right to dictate to me my religious choices, and somewhere along the line he must have become a doctor without an advanced degree because he is an expert in all things medical especially as it pertains to Second and Third - which, as you can imagine, sends me up faster and brighter than a Fourth of July fireworks. No, we do not get along.

    Mom comes from a working class, poor rural German village, but her saving grace is that the trades are absolutely respected in Germany (as in real craftsmen, or very capable tradesmen), she studied hard, and she had a hero for a father - somehow well-versed in holistic health, great appreciation for learning in all its forms, admirer of art and culture, you name it, and absorbed everything her father taught or was. Mom was my firewall many a time from a father who actively sought to discourage anything I ever did. I got my outlook on life from her.

    It would be a real change of pace to have two supportive parents. I am really glad you have your father's support, even if he doesn't really "get" you.

    I married up. Hubby is post-secondary educated, both of his parents and his brother are college educated. His sister is a college dropout - party chick who learned a little late what you are at college to do. Fantastic friend, but lots of issues still to resolve that stem from adoption even though nobody, but nobody, even thinks of the topic - she has always simply been the sister (or SIL in my case). My brother went to a trade school, worked on the shop floor as an advanced-level machinist and impressed the owners so much that he is now off the floor and into management, and currently taking college classes at night to get a piece of paper management would really like him to have. Don't know what that makes him, class-wise.

    If I could create a "perfect society" it would simply be one where it didn't matter, socially or otherwise, what kind of (legit) work you did as long as you do it honestly and well, and have a strong moral character the rest of the time. Wishful thinking, that.
    Last edited by Crabbcakes; 01-25-2013 at 05:05 AM.
    I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

  10. #290
    badgergirl's Avatar
    badgergirl is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,203
    Primal Blueprint Expert Certification
    Small boy is having small girl, daughter of husband's best friend, here for a sleepover. Every ten minutes I call out to them to stop messing and go to sleep. Every fifteen minutes I get up from the embracing arms of Chester Field to catch them in the act of bedroom mutiny. On my last bedroom visit I shouted at them. Oh dear, I will not be the fun mum I had hoped when I was a child. Husband never had sleepovers - his parents kept the five children in a state of house arrest - but I remember all the different rules and routines at my friends' houses. One friend - an only child whose mother was always putting the rest of the mothers to shame - introduced me to midnight feasts. Her mum would bring up a tray of treats in the middle of the night. I am not that mother.

    Yesterday was small girl's birthday party and we were then from 10am to 6pm. I got wasted - red wine, vintage champagne - and ate and ate and ate. Barbecue followed by pizza followed by sweets. Insomnia and glasses of water punctuated the night. When I did sleep I had panic dreams. Rape and violence.

    Husband and I have been talking, talking, talking. Painful, but good painful. There are things there to rescue, I hope. Husband says I have been unhinged ever since we left the UK. It feels better, somehow, to have this recognised. I've felt adrift, lost, without any external validation for so long that I've lost track of who I used to be. Up until now husband has always said - you're still you. But I'm not. I do not feel that I am myself. I feel trapped in a hall of mirrors, lost in distortions. Oh, the melodrama.

    B: yoghurt, coffee
    L: homemade chicken liver pate - best batch ever! a pear
    D: pork and beef mole with sour cream, cheese and rice
    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60211.html Into RPG table top games? Check out FateStorm and (in development) Vanguard!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •