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Thread: Has ANY study shown eating lots of meat is good for longevity and health? page 11

  1. #101
    Omni's Avatar
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    I was doing some surfing on Ketogenic diets regarding disease management,
    Aside from Epilepsy, there is a variety of diseases that respond well to this diet including, Diabetes, Alzheimers, Lafora, Metabolic Syndrome, NA Fatty Liver I'm sure there are others as well.
    Interesting thing I found is that there seemed to be some questions on the NAFL, seems some studies showed improvement but one I found showed the opposite, but it was studying the starvation response, so was only short term (after 36 Hr fast), the fat accumulation in the liver may well be appropriate to a non keto adapted individual.
    It seems Ketogenic diet studies is as close as you will get trying to get a comparison between Paleo style (no grains) to CWD/SAD (grain heavy).

    I won't post all the studies I looked at, but here is a couple of them:
    The effect of the Spanish Ketogenic Medit... [J Med Food. 2011 Jul-Aug] - PubMed - NCBI
    Showed improvement in Fatty Liver & Metabolic Syndrome.

    The next one, although funded by the Atkins foundation, showed improved CHD markers on a Ketogenic diet.
    A Ketogenic Diet Favorably Affects Serum Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease in Normal-Weight Men
    The Diet:
    Dietary intervention. The aim of the intervention diet was to reduce carbohydrate intake to <10% of energy. The diet was designed so that fat comprised 60% of energy with no restrictions on the type of fat from saturated and unsaturated sources or cholesterol levels. The actual diets consumed were mainly comprised of beef (e.g., hamburger and steak), poultry (e.g., chicken and turkey), fish, oils, various nuts/seeds and peanut butter, moderate amounts of vegetables, salads with low-carbohydrate dressing, moderate amounts of cheese, eggs, protein powder, and water or low-carbohydrate diet
    drinks. Foods avoided or consumed infrequently included fruits and fruit juices, most dairy products with the exception of hard cheeses and heavy cream, breads, cereals, beans, rice, desserts/sweets, or any other foods containing substantial amounts of carbohydrate. A portion of the food consumed during the intervention diet (3040% of total energy) was provided to subjects during weekly meetings to review compliance with the registered dietitian. These foods included
    pumpkin seeds, roasted cheese, low-carbohydrate bars, shakes, and bake mix (Atkins Nutritionals, Hauppauge, NY) and protein powders (Super Whey Fuel and Fuel Plex Lite; Twin Laboratories, Hauppauge, NY). Subjects were also provided with a daily multivitamin/mineral complex (Daily One Caps With Iron; Twin Laboratories)
    The foods excluded are probably more telling than those included.

    The Outcome:
    There were significant decreases in fasting serum TAG (33%), postprandial lipemia after a fat-rich meal (29%), and fasting serum insulin concentrations (34%) after men consumed the ketogenic diet. Fasting serum total and LDL cholesterol and oxidized LDL were unaffected and HDL cholesterol tended to increase with the ketogenic diet (11.5%; P  0.066). In subjects with a predominance of small LDL particles pattern B, there were significant increases in mean and peak LDL particle diameter and the percentage of LDL-1 after the ketogenic diet. There were no significant changes in blood lipids in the control group. To our knowledge this is the first study to document the effects of a ketogenic diet on fasting and postprandial CVD biomarkers independent of weight loss. The results suggest that a short-term ketogenic diet does not have a deleterious effect on CVD risk profile and may improve the lipid disorders characteristic of atherogenic dyslipidemia. J. Nutr. 132: 18791885, 2002.
    This is as close a study as I could find to show that consumption of meat, as part of a meat heavy paleo type diet, is better for your health. All the subjects were normal weight men and weight gain or loss was controlled through counselling to eliminate weight loss as a confounding factor.
    Last edited by Omni; 07-16-2012 at 05:47 PM.

  2. #102
    JoanieL's Avatar
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    #1: Eat lots of plants, animals, and insects. That doesn't mean necessarily: eat bacon 'til you puke and you'll be healthy.

    #2: Avoid poisonous things. I'm guessing that for most people in the U.S., if you told them never to eat anything out of a box or can, and to never eat anything cooked that you couldn't eat raw, you'd substantially improve their health. And I think that's what the people in the blue zones have in common foodwise - they don't eat food that's been processed into yummy tasting garbage.


    P.S. I love pork loin. Cook it on high heat; let it rest so the juices go back inside; it's a fine source of leeeeean proteeeein.

  3. #103
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    I enjoy a plumb pork loin as well. But I generally slow cook my meats on lower temps for longer times, as everything I've ever read says it's MUCH healthier to go lower temp. And shouldn't pork be a bit more thoroughly cooked through than other meats? I never heard of pork tartar... But a quick high heat broil to sear the outside I guess is a trade off of sorts. Am curious, what temp & how long do you cook your pork loins?
    "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
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  4. #104
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    Hi Betorq,

    I get the sliced loin "chops" at WFoods. There's just one of me here, so that's easier. Then I put it on the highest heat on my Cuisanart Griddler (best thingy I've bought in a year) - I think that's 450F. Cook 'til grill marks are dark. Turn off and let sit 'til I've prepared the rest of my plate, and they're done.

    If I cooked a whole loin, I'd be eating pork 'til I oinked.

    It is possible to get trichinosis from undercooked pork, but the CDC states: "Cooking is one of the most common methods of assuring that ‘Trichinella’ are destroyed; a temperature of 170 F (77 C) substantially exceeds the thermal death point and is usually achieved if the meat is cooked until it is no longer pink "

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beverly393 View Post
    Are you including fish and eggs in your definition of "meat?"
    Yes, I definitely undercook my meats,eggs & even fish/seafood. I've eaten some amazing raw seafood, when super fresh. I do raw eggs for many years in smoothies, on tartar & cook & eat them runny a lot too.
    "Science is not belief but the will to find out." ~ Anonymous
    "Culture of the mind must be subservient to the heart." ~ Gandhi
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  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by KathyH View Post
    Please point me to these studies. I really want to read them.
    Also by the same analogy it is possible to live on grains as well (not alone).
    Here is a famous study that involved the Arctic explorer, Vilhjalmur Stefansson, who spent one year in a controlled (hospital) environment recreating the diet he had lived on while living with the Eskimos (Inuit) in the Arctic for 11 years. CW of the time thought that living on an all-meat diet would be suicide.

    Eskimos Prove
    An All Meat Diet
    Provides Excellent Health
    Part 1
    Harper's Monthly, November 1935

    "In 1906 I went to the Arctic with the food tastes and beliefs of the average American. By 1918, after eleven years as an Eskimo among Eskimos, I had learned things which caused me to shed most of those beliefs. Ten years later I began to realize that what I had learned was going to influence materially the sciences of medicine and dietetics. However, what finally impressed the scientists and converted many during the last two or three years, was a series of confirmatory experiments upon myself and a colleague performed at Bellevue Hospital, New York City, under the supervision of a committee representing several universities and other organizations."

    for the rest of the story . . . http://mendosa.com/stefansson1.htm"mendosa.com/stefansson1.htm
    Last edited by Primal in Korea; 07-16-2012 at 10:50 PM.

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