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Thread: Blood Donation page 6

  1. #51
    bionicsamm's Avatar
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    Paleobird, by your argument for pathogens, the US should be good with madcow, HIV and Hep. The US blood supply has infected and killed more people than any other blood supply. Canada is almost as bad.

    Given the immunization requirements for my job, starting a campaign for blood donation would be useless as I've already explained, the Canadian blood services deems our blood useless and destroys it.

    I'll stick to saving lives for my day job and someone else can do the blood donation

  2. #52
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    I'm about to go give some blood in the next hour! This will be my first donation since going primal in Dec'2012. As is the norm nowadays, I usually look up " 'activity im doing' + marks daily apple" on Google to see if its been discussed before & I've never been disappointed!

    Great to find this little thread lurking here on MDA! Wish you all a happy Spring/Summer 2013 !

    Regards,
    Vishnu

  3. #53
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    No help for me


    At this time, the American Red Cross donor eligibility rules related to vCJD (mad cow)are as follows:

    You are not eligible to donate if:

    From January 1, 1980, through December 31, 1996, you spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 3 months or more, in the United Kingdom (UK), or
    From January 1, 1980, to present, you had a blood transfusion in any country(ies) in the (UK) or France. The UK includes any of the countries listed below.

    •Channel Islands
    •England
    •Falkland Islands
    •Gibraltar
    •Isle of Man
    •Northern Ireland
    •Scotland
    •Wales
    Eligibility Criteria by Alphabetical Listing | American Red Cross
    04/23/2012 Max Weight : 448 lbs
    01/01/2014 Initial Weight : 438 lbs
    11/20/2014 Current weight : 328 lbs
    12/31/2015 Goal weight : 218 lbs

  4. #54
    diene's Avatar
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    I used to give blood every two months, but that was before I started working out. Since I started working out all the time, I've donated once. I haven't done it again because it really affected my workouts. It took me 10 days to 2 weeks to recover. I feel bad about not giving blood though. It's like, oh, I could save some lives, but my workouts will be harder for 2 weeks so I guess I'm not going to. Perhaps if I ate more liver I would recover more quickly?

  5. #55
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    I give regularly (every 4 months) in the UK, and have only ever once been turned down - because they supposedly had run out of the correct needles to do a proper iron check. (when I was eating too many carbs and processed crap, my blood would float in the test tube) In fact they'd been a bit leery of my acne to start with and had asked if I had chicken pox. They then told me that as they hadn't been able to test the iron levels they couldn't take it. I said fine, I'd go to the neighbouring town when they were there in a few weeks. No, I couldn't do that, because I'd been turned down and would have to wait 8 months now until they'd call me again.

    I did make a complaint because every time my blood has floated or not dropped in the prescribed time, it's always been fine on iron when checked in the light meter. I can see waiting if your iron is actually low, but their log shows 0mgHb for that session, so I should have been dead ... or a vampire , and I was happy to donate at the next session even. Turns out the log of the donation session had no record of running out of the required needles and in fact showed they still had plenty in stock. So I'm pretty sure they just decided my bad flare-up of acne was something I was lying about and yes, that did annoy me.
    Me, My Father and The Alzheimer's - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread84213.html

  6. #56
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    fascinating thread, I gave blood from age 18 to 36 every 16 weeks and nearly got to 75 then had an anaesthetic related stroke. You can never give blood again after that for your own safety. I'm AB-, my blood is only of use to somebody else who is AB- but everyone could have my plasma (universal donor) and I can have anybody else's blood (universal recipient)

  7. #57
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    Interesting discussion.

    As a child I had amoebic dysentery diarrhea, a blood disease that can be cured only by completely replacing all the blood in the body. During WWII in Japan and the Far East at least as many soldiers died of it as did in the actual war. There was no cure at the time. Penicillin "the new wonder drug" had just come out. They tried to treat it with massive doses, but it had no effect. Not many lived through it. I was one of the lucky ones.

    Then in college I donated blood at their Red Cross blood drive. About 2 months later I got a letter from them saying that if I ever crossed their threshold again they would really like to shoot me. Of course I never donated blood again.

    Until 6 years ago. My surgeon wanted 2 pints in reserve for an operation upcoming. At the local blood bank I told them of my blood disease but they said "no problem" even for regular donations. I was really surprised. Science causes a lot of changes. Is the U.S. blood really safe?

    I've read today that the primary benefit to the giver of blood is the removal of excess iron, therefore all men should donate regularly. All pre-menopausal women don't need to because they loose the excess during menstration. What about post-menopausal women, would it benefit them or not? What about post-menopausal iron-anemic women (me)? Would not-supplementing iron give the same benefit as blood donation? What about iron-anemic men?
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 05-21-2013 at 05:26 PM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  8. #58
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    I hope the people who get my blood like bacon and being part superhuman!

    Sent via A-10 Warthog

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbDodger View Post
    fascinating thread, I gave blood from age 18 to 36 every 16 weeks and nearly got to 75 then had an anaesthetic related stroke. You can never give blood again after that for your own safety. I'm AB-, my blood is only of use to somebody else who is AB- but everyone could have my plasma (universal donor) and I can have anybody else's blood (universal recipient)
    I just donated today actually. I'm also AB- so I should probably donate plasma, but the building across from mine has a blood drive every few months, and it's just so much easier to go at lunch. I used to donate plasma in college though, as the center was really close to my apartment. Took a while, but I could study and they paid you 40 bucks!
    No disease that can be treated by diet should be treated with any other means.
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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cryptocode View Post
    Interesting discussion.

    As a child I had amoebic dysentery diarrhea, a blood disease that can be cured only by completely replacing all the blood in the body. During WWII in Japan and the Far East at least as many soldiers died of it as did in the actual war. There was no cure at the time. Penicillin "the new wonder drug" had just come out. They tried to treat it with massive doses, but it had no effect. Not many lived through it. I was one of the lucky ones.

    Then in college I donated blood at their Red Cross blood drive. About 2 months later I got a letter from them saying that if I ever crossed their threshold again they would really like to shoot me. Of course I never donated blood again.

    Until 6 years ago. My surgeon wanted 2 pints in reserve for an operation upcoming. At the local blood bank I told them of my blood disease but they said "no problem" even for regular donations. I was really surprised. Science causes a lot of changes. Is the U.S. blood really safe?
    My mother was Rh- and my brother is Rh+ this means when I was born (A+) she already had Rh antibodies and I was very lucky (probably because I was a few weeks early) to not be born with jaundice and require a full blood transfusion at birth. In any case she was told (mid-1960s) that she could never give blood because of the antibodies, although at O- she was a universal donor. Some time after she had passed the max age for blood donation she was told that they could have taken her blood after all and I believe had a reason for wanting donors with rhesus antibodies specifically. Typical!
    Me, My Father and The Alzheimer's - http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread84213.html

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