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Thread: What weight kettlebell should I buy? to strengthen my back (prevent injury

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  1. #1
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    What weight kettlebell should I buy? to strengthen my back (prevent injury

    I want to do kettlebell swings to strengthen my back (prevent injury)
    I assume I want to go heavy...for maximum benefit/exertion/explosion.
    How many reps should I fail at to know this is the ideal weight?
    How do I figure out the weight to buy? Do swings in the store?
    Last edited by OnlyBodyWeight; 06-25-2012 at 08:40 PM.

  2. #2
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    It's suggested that an untrained female start with 8kg, trained 12kg (for men 16/20kg respectively.) If you intend to work with two-handed swings something bigger as a starting weight may be required. Unless you already have the kettlebell technique dialed in it will be a little difficult to ascertain a good starting weight in-store. Also, in my experience, one progresses fairly quickly in the initial stages, so, again, something beyond a 'comfortable weight is desired.
    All the best!

    PDJ

    The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

    Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

  3. #3
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    Let's try again.
    For the MEN Who use kettlebells to build your back muscles, what weight do you use?

  4. #4
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    I was typing while the other posts were rolling in. I agree with June68 on the lighter being counter-productive to a point. If the person, even a beginner, is somewhat strong, the body needs a weight that is heavy enough to register on the muscles and get the body to do the proper technique. Lots of times people will "muscle" through a swing and do a front shoulder raise instead of the hip pop. In all my training, 2 certs, multiple seminars with tops in the field, if someone isn't picking up on the technique, they always give them a heavier weight.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimT View Post
    I was typing while the other posts were rolling in. I agree with June68 on the lighter being counter-productive to a point. If the person, even a beginner, is somewhat strong, the body needs a weight that is heavy enough to register on the muscles and get the body to do the proper technique. Lots of times people will "muscle" through a swing and do a front shoulder raise instead of the hip pop. In all my training, 2 certs, multiple seminars with tops in the field, if someone isn't picking up on the technique, they always give them a heavier weight.
    I just have to say something about this comment, it's driving me nuts. In what universe is it a good idea to "add weight" to an exercise when the client isn't getting the movement. This is how personal trainers get a bad name. By handing out bullshit advice like this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron Will View Post
    I just have to say something about this comment, it's driving me nuts. In what universe is it a good idea to "add weight" to an exercise when the client isn't getting the movement. This is how personal trainers get a bad name. By handing out bullshit advice like this.
    Guess you need to take that issue up with Pavel, Steve Cotter, Ken Blackburn, Mike Mahler, and the numerous other kettlebell instructors I've worked with, learned from, and trained with. I'm not saying they "can't handle" a weight. I would never jeopardize a client by asking them to go heavier. I'm not saying to go from a 12kg to a 32kg. I'm saying the musculature may not recognize the lighter weight and therefore by going from a 12kg to a 16kg, the client gets to feel the muscles that need to be firing in the posterior chain instead of doing a shoulder raise to correctly do a swing.

    There are always conflicting views of the "right way" to do things. Guess like everything else in life, people need to pick who and what they follow and feel is best for them.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimT View Post
    Guess you need to take that issue up with Pavel, Steve Cotter, Ken Blackburn, Mike Mahler, and the numerous other kettlebell instructors I've worked with, learned from, and trained with. I'm not saying they "can't handle" a weight. I would never jeopardize a client by asking them to go heavier. I'm not saying to go from a 12kg to a 32kg. I'm saying the musculature may not recognize the lighter weight and therefore by going from a 12kg to a 16kg, the client gets to feel the muscles that need to be firing in the posterior chain instead of doing a shoulder raise to correctly do a swing.

    There are always conflicting views of the "right way" to do things. Guess like everything else in life, people need to pick who and what they follow and feel is best for them.
    Kim you have to understand that when you go into a seminar, the instructors are teaching you how to use the particular tool that they are promoting. They don't have the time to walk over to each and every person and diagnose faulty movement patterns. That's why they get you to increase the weight in the seminar. To force your body into dynamic movement. It has absolutely nothing to do with training your muscles to fire correctly. It's a short cut that they use to make sure you (The trainer) figure out the movement. So that you can promote the product and make them more money.

    After the seminar, it's now your responsibility as the learned trainer to go and figure out how to get the client's faulty movement patterns working correctly first so that they can use the specific tool that you are showing them. If you use the same short cut that is being used in a seminar while teaching (supposedly) athletic, strong and physically fit trainers with your clients, you are mixing a recipe for disaster. Like I said in my first post, be the better trainer and learn why the client has faulty movement patterns instead of overloading the client to bypass the already apparent instability.

    I would say the exact same thing to someone who was training with the rip trainer, TRX, bosu, swiss ball, ViPR, or pick up sticks. The value of learning why vs training for over compensation is invaluable.
    Last edited by Iron Will; 06-28-2012 at 09:29 AM.

  8. #8
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    My husband has been a weight lifter and runner for many years and he started with a 20kg bell and now uses a 24kg for most everything. I use a 16kg and am a beginner. I think it depends on your overall body strength, stamina and coordination. Be aware that kettlebell workouts use LARGE muscle groups and rely on bone for structural support so starting too light is counter-beneficial. Google Pavel or Dan John and kettlebell and check out their beginner tutorials.
    5' 9" 47 YO F
    PB start June 2, 2012
    Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
    Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by June68 View Post
    starting too light is counter-beneficial..
    Where is your proof of that? Using a lighter k-bell is not going to make your weaker!!!! Which "counter-beneficial" would imply. People starting out k-belling should start with a lighter k-bell first to get form down, before swinging a 50 lb + bell. With Kettle belling, form definitely comes before function.
    I Kettlebell therefore I am.

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  10. #10
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    Well, from all my listening and reading of Dan and Pavel, it seems a light bell can limit your ability to stress your muscles and you do not properly control the bell, instead it flies out of line easier than a heavier one. At least that's what I get from the pair of them. Nothing wrong with practicing with a light one, but if the OP wants to build strength on top of what he has, he may be better served by starting out a bit heavier.

    So where's your proof that it isn't counter productive? And where did I say he should start with 50lbs plus? I said MY HUSBAND did because he already could do 20 pull ups and bench 350 before starting with a bell.
    5' 9" 47 YO F
    PB start June 2, 2012
    Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)
    Current deadlift 245 lbs, squat 165 lbs, bench press 135 lbs


    PB Journal

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