Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47

Thread: What weight kettlebell should I buy? to strengthen my back (prevent injury page

  1. #1
    OnlyBodyWeight's Avatar
    OnlyBodyWeight is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    USA, F.yea!
    Posts
    252

    What weight kettlebell should I buy? to strengthen my back (prevent injury

    Primal Fuel
    I want to do kettlebell swings to strengthen my back (prevent injury)
    I assume I want to go heavy...for maximum benefit/exertion/explosion.
    How many reps should I fail at to know this is the ideal weight?
    How do I figure out the weight to buy? Do swings in the store?
    Last edited by OnlyBodyWeight; 06-25-2012 at 08:40 PM.

  2. #2
    pdjesson's Avatar
    pdjesson is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Burton, Staffs., UK
    Posts
    130
    It's suggested that an untrained female start with 8kg, trained 12kg (for men 16/20kg respectively.) If you intend to work with two-handed swings something bigger as a starting weight may be required. Unless you already have the kettlebell technique dialed in it will be a little difficult to ascertain a good starting weight in-store. Also, in my experience, one progresses fairly quickly in the initial stages, so, again, something beyond a 'comfortable weight is desired.
    All the best!

    PDJ

    The quieter you become the more you're able to hear.

    Mawlana Jalaludin Rumi

  3. #3
    OnlyBodyWeight's Avatar
    OnlyBodyWeight is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    USA, F.yea!
    Posts
    252
    Let's try again.
    For the MEN Who use kettlebells to build your back muscles, what weight do you use?

  4. #4
    June68's Avatar
    June68 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    511
    My husband has been a weight lifter and runner for many years and he started with a 20kg bell and now uses a 24kg for most everything. I use a 16kg and am a beginner. I think it depends on your overall body strength, stamina and coordination. Be aware that kettlebell workouts use LARGE muscle groups and rely on bone for structural support so starting too light is counter-beneficial. Google Pavel or Dan John and kettlebell and check out their beginner tutorials.
    5' 9" 44 YO F
    PB start June 2, 2012
    Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)


    PB Journal

  5. #5
    TorMag's Avatar
    TorMag is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by June68 View Post
    starting too light is counter-beneficial..
    Where is your proof of that? Using a lighter k-bell is not going to make your weaker!!!! Which "counter-beneficial" would imply. People starting out k-belling should start with a lighter k-bell first to get form down, before swinging a 50 lb + bell. With Kettle belling, form definitely comes before function.
    I Kettlebell therefore I am.

    My Journal
    My Journal

  6. #6
    June68's Avatar
    June68 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    511
    Well, from all my listening and reading of Dan and Pavel, it seems a light bell can limit your ability to stress your muscles and you do not properly control the bell, instead it flies out of line easier than a heavier one. At least that's what I get from the pair of them. Nothing wrong with practicing with a light one, but if the OP wants to build strength on top of what he has, he may be better served by starting out a bit heavier.

    So where's your proof that it isn't counter productive? And where did I say he should start with 50lbs plus? I said MY HUSBAND did because he already could do 20 pull ups and bench 350 before starting with a bell.
    5' 9" 44 YO F
    PB start June 2, 2012
    Pre PB SW = 180 (no scale at home, Mom's scale January - 153lbs!)


    PB Journal

  7. #7
    KimT's Avatar
    KimT is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    180
    Female responding, but have 7 years kb expereience as certified coach through the IKFF. It truly depends on your fitness and flexibility level. I used to train a big guy, could lift a lot of weight, but couldn't do swings for any amount of time with a 25 pound bell due to back/glute/hamstring/hip flexor tightness. On the flip side, I trained a lady in her 60's that was to the point of using a 53 pound bell for all her swings. The other day we did a workout that had swings in it. My husband used a 106 pound bell and I used a 70. It truly depends on your ability. Maybe try to find a gym with bells that you can experiment with. Be sure to get proper instruction (not Bob Harper or Jillian Michaels DVD's), get your technique, then decide what weight to buy. A lot of trainers have their own bells, so maybe find one in your area and take a class or two to get a feel for it. Check either the IKFF, WKC, or RKC. Different styles, but usually reputable trainers. I see you are in NY, depending on the area, I have a friend in NYC that trains.

  8. #8
    TorMag's Avatar
    TorMag is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by KimT View Post
    Female responding, but have 7 years kb expereience as certified coach through the IKFF. It truly depends on your fitness and flexibility level. I used to train a big guy, could lift a lot of weight, but couldn't do swings for any amount of time with a 25 pound bell due to back/glute/hamstring/hip flexor tightness. On the flip side, I trained a lady in her 60's that was to the point of using a 53 pound bell for all her swings. The other day we did a workout that had swings in it. My husband used a 106 pound bell and I used a 70. It truly depends on your ability. Maybe try to find a gym with bells that you can experiment with. Be sure to get proper instruction (not Bob Harper or Jillian Michaels DVD's), get your technique, then decide what weight to buy. A lot of trainers have their own bells, so maybe find one in your area and take a class or two to get a feel for it. Check either the IKFF, WKC, or RKC. Different styles, but usually reputable trainers. I see you are in NY, depending on the area, I have a friend in NYC that trains.
    Great advice
    I Kettlebell therefore I am.

    My Journal
    My Journal

  9. #9
    KimT's Avatar
    KimT is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    180
    I was typing while the other posts were rolling in. I agree with June68 on the lighter being counter-productive to a point. If the person, even a beginner, is somewhat strong, the body needs a weight that is heavy enough to register on the muscles and get the body to do the proper technique. Lots of times people will "muscle" through a swing and do a front shoulder raise instead of the hip pop. In all my training, 2 certs, multiple seminars with tops in the field, if someone isn't picking up on the technique, they always give them a heavier weight.

  10. #10
    Drmike's Avatar
    Drmike is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    97
    What you mean Bob Harper and Jillian Michaels aren't experts on every new fitness trend if it could sell more of their DVDs (sarcasm)

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •