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Thread: Calling any recovered EDs - I need som help with binge-fast-binge cycle page 3

  1. #21
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    BestBetter - thanks for taking the time to write that! As a struggling binge eater your comments/ideas were helpful I recently went to an OA meeting and they talked about something you hit on - that binge eaters need to "medicate" every day. And by "medicate" they meant - go to meetings, work on different self-talk, journal, whatever the case may be. The same way we would never expect to increase strength or lose body fat by lifting or dieting for one day - rather it is a months/years of choices that change our bodies - the same is true of binge eating restraint. Each and every cookie aisle you may need to talk yourself through. Each day you may need to attend an OA meeting or journal or something. Just like taking a pill for blood pressure or something. You just gotta keep going.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dexy View Post
    Do you have an ED? Binging can be a little bit different from 'normal' eaters. I can binge with impunity when I'm not having an episode of anorexia, pick myself up and get on with life. But the anorexia brings with it obsessive thoughts about food and very compulsive food behaviour. This for me is worse than the binges as it's constant and sould destroying.
    It is great and I don't think I will go back to bingeing any time soon. Primal might not be the best diet for you though. I could not stop myself from bingeing on primal. The best way to do it is to not restrict any foods, even "trigger foods," just eat them in moderation and control yourself.

    Also, I would binge on any diet. Primal has nothing to do with it -why do you think it would?
    Being primal can cause bingeing because it restricts whole food groups...I have read opinions from different "experts" that restricting whole food groups causes you to fixate and binge on them, and I know it does for me. I eat everything I want, but in moderation.

    And I certainly am not anorexic but I can't imagine that I don't have binge eating disorder. I would eat until I was stuffed and eat more and more throughout the day. I have finally gotten a handle on it and it feels great. Brain over binge was a big part of that.

    To be honest thought binge eating disorder is completely different than anorexia and I have no idea how to deal with anorexia. I would think just forcing yourself to eat a normal diet would do it but I guess for some reason or another that is hard to do?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorichka6 View Post
    BestBetter - thanks for taking the time to write that! As a struggling binge eater your comments/ideas were helpful I recently went to an OA meeting and they talked about something you hit on - that binge eaters need to "medicate" every day. And by "medicate" they meant - go to meetings, work on different self-talk, journal, whatever the case may be. The same way we would never expect to increase strength or lose body fat by lifting or dieting for one day - rather it is a months/years of choices that change our bodies - the same is true of binge eating restraint. Each and every cookie aisle you may need to talk yourself through. Each day you may need to attend an OA meeting or journal or something. Just like taking a pill for blood pressure or something. You just gotta keep going.
    I don't want to sound like a negative nancy, but I really think this view is complete BS. You don't need to journal or go to meetings to stop binge eating. You need to do EXACTLY one thing. Learn how to deal with your cravings to binge. If you learn how to deal with your craving to binge and not give in, you will never binge again. And the more you refuse these cravings the easier it will get until the cravings become less frequent and ultimately all but disappear.

    I have friends and family that have gone through AA and the like and I think it is complete BS. It helps some but it just makes it easier to rationalize IMO when "you are powerless to your addiction." That is BULLSHIT, no one is powerless to their addiction, and you don't need a higher power for help. All you need is discipline and you need to figure out a way to deal with your cravings.

    As I said, if you have problems with bingeing I cant recommend this book enough. Look at the reviews.

    Amazon.com: Brain over Binge: Why I Was Bulimic, Why Conventional Therapy Didn't Work, and How I Recovered for Good (9780984481705): Kathryn Hansen: Books

  4. #24
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    [QUOTE=jimhensen;880460]I don't want to sound like a negative nancy, but I really think this view is complete BS. You don't need to journal or go to meetings to stop binge eating. You need to do EXACTLY one thing. Learn how to deal with your cravings to binge. If you learn how to deal with your craving to binge and not give in, you will never binge again. And the more you refuse these cravings the easier it will get until the cravings become less frequent and ultimately all but disappear.

    I have friends and family that have gone through AA and the like and I think it is complete BS. It helps some but it just makes it easier to rationalize IMO when "you are powerless to your addiction." That is BULLSHIT, no one is powerless to their addiction, and you don't need a higher power for help. All you need is discipline and you need to figure out a way to deal with your cravings. /QUOTE]

    Jim, at first I actually way impressed that you were giving some seriously compassionate, and helpful advice. But now I'm realizing that you really don't know what you're talking about, and you're a little out of your league here.

    Maybe journaling isn't your thing, but who are you to say that it's BS if it works for some people? And for that matter, who are you to call AA BS? My suicidal alcoholic mother would have killed herself years ago, had she not become sober and transformed herself through the help of AA. It's an organization of generous, compassionate addicts who take charge of their recovery and has helped probably millions of people. Maybe I should go tell my mom that some schmuck on the internet says AA's 'powerless to your additiction' idea isn't cool enough and she should drop the whole thing. Too bad, she just celebrated her 10th sober year and finds great fulfillment in sponsoring others.

    If you don't agree with their stance, keep it to yourself, because no one cares about your opinion on this.

    Not everyone can just order a book off of Amazon and fix their lives like you did.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BestBetter View Post
    I don't want to sound like a negative nancy, but I really think this view is complete BS. You don't need to journal or go to meetings to stop binge eating. You need to do EXACTLY one thing. Learn how to deal with your cravings to binge. If you learn how to deal with your craving to binge and not give in, you will never binge again. And the more you refuse these cravings the easier it will get until the cravings become less frequent and ultimately all but disappear.

    I have friends and family that have gone through AA and the like and I think it is complete BS. It helps some but it just makes it easier to rationalize IMO when "you are powerless to your addiction." That is BULLSHIT, no one is powerless to their addiction, and you don't need a higher power for help. All you need is discipline and you need to figure out a way to deal with your cravings. /QUOTE]

    Jim, at first I actually way impressed that you were giving some seriously compassionate, and helpful advice. But now I'm realizing that you really don't know what you're talking about, and you're a little out of your league here.

    Maybe journaling isn't your thing, but who are you to say that it's BS if it works for some people? And for that matter, who are you to call AA BS? My suicidal alcoholic mother would have killed herself years ago, had she not become sober and transformed herself through the help of AA. It's an organization of generous, compassionate addicts who take charge of their recovery and has helped probably millions of people. Maybe I should go tell my mom that some schmuck on the internet says AA's 'powerless to your additiction' idea isn't cool enough and she should drop the whole thing. Too bad, she just celebrated her 10th sober year and finds great fulfillment in sponsoring others.

    If you don't agree with their stance, keep it to yourself, because no one cares about your opinion on this.

    Not everyone can just order a book off of Amazon and fix their lives like you did.
    Well just about anyone can order the book off amazon. If it changes their lives is another thing.

    As for my comments on AA, NA, OA, and whatever other anonymous meetings their are, I will stand by them. Like I said, they work for some people, and that is great. If it helps you I would never say you should stop or it isn't the right thing for you. But I really had a problem with THIS STATEMENT:

    "I recently went to an OA meeting and they talked about something you hit on - that binge eaters need to "medicate" every day. And by "medicate" they meant - go to meetings, work on different self-talk, journal, whatever the case may be."

    This is COMPLETE BULLSHIT. Binge eaters DON'T need to do anything other than not binge. If a journal or going to meetings helps, great, do it, but by no means is it 100% necessary and it certainly won't stop everyone from bingeing.

  6. #26
    Omni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimhensen View Post
    This is COMPLETE BULLSHIT. Binge eaters DON'T need to do anything other than not binge. If a journal or going to meetings helps, great, do it, but by no means is it 100% necessary and it certainly won't stop everyone from bingeing.
    It's not quite as simple as that, if it was we would all be living a utopian lifestyle.
    It's like saying Anxious people should just stop worrying or depressed people should just be happy.
    Bingeing is not the issue, it is merely a symptom of an underlying condition, just stoping the Binge does not resolve the problem, it may help and be a part of the solution but the drivers for the behaviour need to be addressed. BestBetter has put forward some good points on the process of Neural reprogramming of the behavioural triggers, CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) is one of the techniques to do this.
    Basically the brain has learned a set of responses, most likely in childhood, these may have been appropriate for that time and place, but are not appropriate for the current time as we have matured and are different now, yet the behaviour persists. The behaviour is a well worn groove and as soon as we get the trigger off we go down that groove, so the process is to build new neural pathways as alternatives. Identifying the trigger point and throwing in a trip line to distract us, so at the first sign of a Binge thought we count to 100, do a set of breathing exercises, run around the block, talk to someone, write in a Journal etc. etc. gradually the Binge trigger becomes associated with a new behavioural pathway. Over time the urge becomes weaker and weaker until it fades out entirely, for some it may take a few months, others may take years.
    Personally as a child I had anger issues, if people touched me at the wrong time I'd go into a blind rage, one day I hurt someone pretty badly and I realised this was not a good thing, so every time I hit that trigger i took it out on an inanimate object, gradually over time because my violence hurt me more than the rock or tree, I learned to take a few deep breaths and let it pass. I have seen similar processes for all manner of behavioural issues in myself and others, first step is recognition and identifying a trigger point, then providing an alternative healthier behaviour, but it is up to the individual to take the required steps and retrain their mind, diligence is required and it does take time & dedication.
    Last edited by Omni; 06-25-2012 at 06:19 PM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Omni View Post
    It's not quite as simple as that, if it was we would all be living a utopian lifestyle.
    It's like saying Anxious people should just stop worrying or depressed people should just be happy.
    Bingeing is not the issue, it is merely a symptom of an underlying condition, just stoping the Binge does not resolve the problem, it may help and be a part of the solution but the drivers for the behaviour need to be addressed. BestBetter has put forward some good points on the process of Neural reprogramming of the behavioural triggers, CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) is one of the techniques to do this.
    Basically the brain has learned a set of responses, most likely in childhood, these may have been appropriate for that time and place, but are not appropriate for the current time as we have matured and are different now, yet the behaviour persists. The behaviour is a well worn groove and as soon as we get the trigger off we go down that groove, so the process is to build new neural pathways as alternatives. Identifying the trigger point and throwing in a trip line to distract us, so at the first sign of a Binge thought we count to 100, do a set of breathing exercises, run around the block, talk to someone, write in a Journal etc. etc. gradually the Binge trigger becomes associated with a new behavioural pathway. Over time the urge becomes weaker and weaker until it fades out entirely, for some it may take a few months, others may take years.
    Personally as a child I had anger issues, if people touched me at the wrong time I'd go into a blind rage, one day I hurt someone pretty badly and I realised this was not a good thing, so every time I hit that trigger i took it out on an inanimate object, gradually over time because my violence hurt me more than the rock or tree, I learned to take a few deep breaths and let it pass. I have seen similar processes for all manner of behavioural issues in myself and others, first step is recognition and identifying a trigger point, then providing an alternative healthier behaviour, but it is up to the individual to take the required steps and retrain their mind, diligence is required and it does take time & dedication.
    Well stopping the bingeing stops the bingeing problem. If you have underlying issues that led to bingeing you might want to resolve them for a life improvement but it isn't necessary to stop bingeing.

    I completely agree with what you said though. You need to reprogram your brain by not giving into your cravings to binge. Whatever strategy that works is the right one for you.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimhensen View Post
    This is COMPLETE BULLSHIT. Binge eaters DON'T need to do anything other than not binge.
    Oh. And all anorexics have to do is stop starving themselves and start eating. Gosh, it's so simple! Who would have thought?

    /snark

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackieKessler View Post
    Oh. And all anorexics have to do is stop starving themselves and start eating. Gosh, it's so simple! Who would have thought?

    /snark
    Check out the book that I have linked up twice in this thread. To stop binge eating you just need to learn how to deal with your cravings. No one ever binges unless they get a craving to binge. Every single binge comes after a craving to binge. So instead of trying to eliminate your triggers, you need to address how you deal with the craving to binge. If you learn to deal with your craving to binge, and not give into it, you will stop bingeing whether you resolve your personal issues or not.

  10. #30
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    I don't think I have a binge disorder, but I did notice that when I tried IFing or fasting longer than 14 hrs I would way overeat in the next few days. Not just eat more, but with the feeling of loss of control and shame afterwards. Once I stopped IF, the urge to overeat also went away (mostly). Just my own experience.

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