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Thread: Runners stitch page

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    GeorgiaPeach's Avatar
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    Runners stitch

    When sprinting, how do I handle runner's stitch?
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
    When sprinting, how do I handle runner's stitch?
    Deep abdominal breathing; inhale through the nose, exhale through the mouth or bouncing lightly on mid-foot inhale through nose and continuous/extended (as long as you can) exhale through the mouth.

    *Edit: That is lightly bouncing mid-foot not on the balls of your feet.
    Last edited by pdjesson; 06-24-2012 at 10:12 AM.
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    While running not a whole lot you can do, deep breathing helps, slowing down, also putting pressure on the stitch.

    As far as prevention I've figured out what causes a side stitch for me, and it's drinking water (or anything) before I run. Anytime I have liquid in my stomach I get stitches.

    My window is 30 mins, I won't drink more than a sip within 30 minutes of running.
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    I find that if I do tricep stretches, where you're reaching over your head to your shoulder blades and stretching your torso/rib cage, and add a bit of a side bend, that I don't get the stitches as much.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderlust View Post
    While running not a whole lot you can do, deep breathing helps, slowing down, also putting pressure on the stitch.

    As far as prevention I've figured out what causes a side stitch for me, and it's drinking water (or anything) before I run. Anytime I have liquid in my stomach I get stitches.

    My window is 30 mins, I won't drink more than a sip within 30 minutes of running.
    What else might cause it besides food/liquid?
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    It's caused by a build-up of lactic acid in the liver when the muscles are using anaerobic respiration for energy. This can be prevented by improving cardiovascular fitness. Also if you eat within a few hours prior to exercise, your liver will still be working on processing metabolites from the meal, so it won't be able to recycle the lactic acid back to glucose via the Cori cycle so quickly as it would in a fasted state, and this can cause the stitch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleo-bunny View Post
    It's caused by a build-up of lactic acid in the liver when the muscles are using anaerobic respiration for energy. This can be prevented by improving cardiovascular fitness. Also if you eat within a few hours prior to exercise, your liver will still be working on processing metabolites from the meal, so it won't be able to recycle the lactic acid back to glucose via the Cori cycle so quickly as it would in a fasted state, and this can cause the stitch.
    Okay, that makes sense. So maybe Do my sprinting pre-breakfast? Will that affect my need for carbs? Essentially, that would be like sprinting in a fasted state... Is that okay? Or would it be better to eat a banana, sprint, then eat breakfast?
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaPeach View Post
    Okay, that makes sense. So maybe Do my sprinting pre-breakfast? Will that affect my need for carbs? Essentially, that would be like sprinting in a fasted state... Is that okay? Or would it be better to eat a banana, sprint, then eat breakfast?
    Yes, sprinting in a fasted state should be OK. If you're OK with caffeine, I'd advise you drink a coffee beforehand - that helps with glycogen breakdown to release glucose. Try to do it without eating the banana.

    I used to do a couple of early morning workouts like that last summer, and I was fine, but I'd carb loaded with about 100-120 g of starch the evening before.

    I usually do sprints in the evening, about 6 hours after I last ate.

    I've found that endurance cardio has helped eliminate stitches.
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    GeorgiaPeach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paleo-bunny View Post
    Yes, sprinting in a fasted state should be OK. If you're OK with caffeine, I'd advise you drink a coffee beforehand - that helps with glycogen breakdown to release glucose. Try to do it without eating the banana.

    I used to do a couple of early morning workouts like that last summer, and I was fine, but I'd carb loaded with about 100-120 g of starch the evening before.

    I usually do sprints in the evening, about 6 hours after I last ate.

    I've found that endurance cardio has helped eliminate stitches.
    Wouldn't the liquid make me sloshy?

    When you say endurance cardio, do you mean training other than sprints... As in jogging?
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    I don't understand why liquid would give you a stitch.

    Er yes, I'm talking about jogging. I used to get stitches a lot as a child. When I took up jogging about 14 years ago and finally managed to jog 400 m for the first time in my life, that's when I stopped getting stitches. Previously I'd had no problems with walking or cycling loads or even playing tennis for two hours - that's very stop-start. But previously I'd always struggled to jog continuously for 400 m, to the point of extreme exhaustion and pain. Actually, I'd never managed it. I always gave up at 300 m.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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