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  1. #1
    Nady's Avatar
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    Is it really a binge?

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    Or is it as natural as primal? The general idea is that binge eating is disordered eating~ but what if it's not? What if it's pre-wired in us, a leftover survival instinct? I always wondered how I could go all day without eating and then have something healthy, like a hard-boiled egg, and then be off and running, in the pantry, the refrigerator, searching for something else and eating it~ then I read Fast-5 and learned about limbic hunger. It makes sense. Maybe it's time people stopped beating themselves up for their lack of control and started to consider that it's a leftover from our pre-history and not some personal failure.

    Any thoughts?

    from Better Is Better: Fast-5 Fat Loss - Part 2 Of The Bert Herring Interview

    Adam: That makes sense. I wanted to ask you about hunger. I think any one that's tried fasting, will probably be a little bit more familiar with the different types of hunger that exist. You tend to experiment with it a little bit when you're fasting. You discussed certain categories in your book; can you just talk about that a little bit?

    Bert: Yes, I refer to two types. One that's called somatic hunger. "Somatic" just means "of the body". The other is limbic hunger. Limbic hunger refers to the limbic system of the brain which is where your instinctive behaviors are.

    The reason I make that separation is that there's hunger behavior when a person is driven to eat despite whatever they might feel in the rest of the body. The somatic hunger refers to the sensation of discomfort in the belly.

    One of the things I became aware of, that's why I did my study on this, is that many people go through the behavior of eating and are driven to eat, and I had seen myself doing this, even if they had a conscious recognition that they were not particularly hungry.

    And certainly a conscious recognition that the fat storage was certainly ample on fuel. So they knew they didn't need the food, they weren't necessarily feeling hunger in their belly, but it was still a compulsion to eat. So that's what I call limbic hunger. The somatic hunger is the crampy, uncomfortable feeling in the belly.

    Adam: Interesting. It's driven a lot I would imagine by emotions, boredom and social aspects play a big role in driving those hungers. I liked in the book how you said that just shutting it off completely, just throwing the switch, helps you overcome that urge to eat.

    Instead of saying, "Well I can just have a little bit of this and a little bit of that", which turns into a lot of something you didn't mean to eat in the first place.

    Bert: That's one of the keys of any fasting regimen success, I believe. It's a lot easier to just not eat than to eat a little bit, because of the instinctive response that we have apparently acquired. When our bodies realize that food is available, it is a drive to eat more than what we need of it, so that we have some stored for later.

    Adam: Which was probably very useful a couple of hundred thousand years ago.

    Bert: Absolutely, because all we had for a refrigerator was what we could store in our bodies

  2. #2
    MarissaLinnea's Avatar
    MarissaLinnea is offline Senior Member
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    That's really interesting and probably a pretty healthy way of looking at binging behavior. But like many things, I think there are degrees of severity with binging behavior and for some, it gets to the point of actually being very unhealthy instead of just a natural thing that our bodies are driving us to do. What I get from the above conversation is that this isn't necessarily "binging", but moreso an example of overeating. Like, you're not hungry but you continue to eat for a bit anyway just because something tastes good, or simply because you just have the urge to eat more.

    But binging is different, IMO.

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    Nady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarissaLinnea View Post
    That's really interesting and probably a pretty healthy way of looking at binging behavior. But like many things, I think there are degrees of severity with binging behavior and for some, it gets to the point of actually being very unhealthy instead of just a natural thing that our bodies are driving us to do. What I get from the above conversation is that this isn't necessarily "binging", but moreso an example of overeating. Like, you're not hungry but you continue to eat for a bit anyway just because something tastes good, or simply because you just have the urge to eat more.

    But binging is different, IMO.
    Is it?
    ~from above interview~

    And certainly a conscious recognition that the fat storage was certainly ample on fuel. So they knew they didn't need the food, they weren't necessarily feeling hunger in their belly, but it was still a compulsion to eat. So that's what I call limbic hunger. The somatic hunger is the crampy, uncomfortable feeling in the belly.
    I think it's the 'compulsion' aspect that defines it as binge behavior. Of course, there would be degrees~

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    I agree that a compulsion to binge must have conferred a big survival advantage for Grok. Innate programmed behaviours have backfired in the modern world of convenience foods, overabundance and variety.

    I'm sure that over-indulging at a social event when there is huge spread of food is perfectly natural and psychologically beneficial. Experiments have shown that the wider the food choices offered, the more people tend to eat, indicating that we are programmed to overeat in a fashion that promotes a wider variety of micronutrients. They show that variety is judged by appearance of food, e.g. subjects offered to help themselves to a multi-coloured bowl of smarties eat significantly more than subjects offered a bowl of the same sweets all of the same colour.
    F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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    The modern commercial addictive foods offered to people are disordered. Not the people themselves I think
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