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Thread: Gourmet paleo/primal meals page

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    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    Gourmet paleo/primal meals

    Suggestions? Especially since serving plain steaks or other cooked meat with a nice salad is pretty vernacular for me now.

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    Souffles are pretty easy to make once you get the hang, they're egg-based, and you can make savory or sweet. Nice wow factor.

    Cure a gravlax and eat it all week.

    Last week I made a double batch of beef short ribs and had them for lunch with a dollop of sour cream and a side of spicy kim chi. You can play with the seasonings you like best.

    Raw oysters with lemon juice and a shot of hot sauce, or oysters rockefeller sans bread crumbs, always make a statement. Add less expensive "caviars" to foods for some interest: salmon roe with eggs, e.g.

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    sakura_girl's Avatar
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    Yeah, I definitely cannot wait for my 8oz ramekins to get back in the mail Then I will definitely be doing a lot more baking.

    Probably won't do the short ribs just because they're really fatty, so I'd have to buy grass-fed meat...and then the price will be wayyyy jacked up for that

    Gravlax is also way expensive.

    Maybe I should revise the thread to say "gourmet-looking recipes" since I'm on a limited food budget as far as that goes XD

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    Check traditional french recipes. Most of them are pretty primal. Usually just have to leave out the flour thickener for sauces. I've found that an egg yolk or nothing tends to work just fine.

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    I love the fattiness of the short ribs, it's part of the appeal! My grass-fed farms sell ribs for $5-7 a pound, but I figure for $15-20 for 3#, I get several nice lunches out of the deal.

    And for gravlax, the whole expense is the salmon. We get ours from Costco, so again, you're eating for ~$20 for a week of noshes.

    Souffle is as cheap as the price of eggs!

    Salad Nicoise looks and tastes pretty damned impressive, and is easy to do.

    Serving whole chicken/duck or fish can be very impressive looking + bones for stock, and cheaper by the pound.

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    Traditional recipes would be a great place to start. Particularly things like hearty meat & veggie stews are excellent options.

    For example, Beef Bourguignon needs almost no alteration at all to be Primal/Paleo friendly. A dash of arrowroot or extra time cooking down is all the thickener you need to remove the flour. While Beef Bourguignon was traditionally a peasent dish, it's grown up to be considered a gourmet meal in many upscale restaurants.

    Many recipes that call for being served over rice or noodles will do just fine without them. Traditional Italian Sunday Gravy (the fore bearer of modern spaghetti & meatballs ) can easily be served sans spaghetti and is just wonderful.

    Plus you can easily adapt other regional/comfort food favorites like Puchero or Swedish Meatballs without much effort.

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    How 'bout my beef wellington?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
    Souffles are pretty easy to make once you get the hang, they're egg-based, and you can make savory or sweet. Nice wow factor.

    Cure a gravlax and eat it all week.

    Last week I made a double batch of beef short ribs and had them for lunch with a dollop of sour cream and a side of spicy kim chi. You can play with the seasonings you like best.

    Raw oysters with lemon juice and a shot of hot sauce, or oysters rockefeller sans bread crumbs, always make a statement. Add less expensive "caviars" to foods for some interest: salmon roe with eggs, e.g.
    NomNomNomNom... looks up with adoring smile at Finnegan, juices running down chin... NomNomNom.... wipes face...

    Dumbass answer, Sakura, but are you into cookbooks at all? If you enjoy being in the kitchen, which is half the battle won right there, putz around in the cookbook section of your local library. I know this now, but when I first started checking there, I was happily stunned by the sheer variety.

    I am the cook for a family of six (me, hubby, and four kids), and most of us have food issues (one dairy-allergic celiac, one on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, two who react to chemically additive-crap, one who is a super-taster (seriously), and the last one just wants to eat - f*** cooking), and I know how the chop-in-pan-plus-salad thing gets old, even if we truly like it.

    Excepting the Martha Stewart's Cookies / Baking / Pies and Tarts books, don't discount anything. I currently have borrowed books of Greek home cooking, popsicles (fresh fruit and vegetable juices), traditional Irish cooking (Daria Allen), several raw "cooking" books, Mark Bittman's "The Best Recipes in the World", one called "Bacon" by James Villas, and "The Ultimate Soup Cookbook" by Reader's Digest. I'm finding stuff in all of them. If you have a scanner at home, create a file on the computer, scan the recipes like a fiend, and start compiling your own collection of favorite recipes.

    A family favorite - crockpot smoked ham hocks. These are cheap here.

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    magicmerl's Avatar
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    Here's our go-to gourmet dessert that multiplies incredibly easily:
    Banana-Skin Split
    Slice an unpeeled banana lengthwise.
    Dust lightly with cinnamon.
    Grill until soft and starting to brown.
    Top with whipped cream and grated dark chocolate.
    Serve in the skin.
    Serves 2 (or more likely, 1)

    A steak is also a gourmet meal by itself. I find that the difference is how the vegetables are presented with the steak:
    Vege Mash
    Boil kumara and parsnip. Steam carrots.
    Roughly mash together (so there are still some visible solids).
    Shape into patties and serve.

    Here's a cheaper one:
    Shepherds Pie
    Slow cook some stewing steak for 8-10 hours, then shred with forks.
    Stir fry some onions, mushrooms, carrots and courgettes.
    Cook the Vege Mash above.
    In a big casserole dish, layer the meat, then the stiry fry, then the mash.
    Bake for 20-30 min. Serve.

    I also have a fairly kick-ass lagagne but it uses cornflour to make the sauce (and milk and cheese....).
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

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    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
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    Leida's Avatar
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    There is a world of stuffed recipies worth exploring. One simple trick is to substitute grains and rice used in those recipes with chopped boiled eggs. Cabbage rolls are wonderful that way.

    Chicken cordon blue is pretty primal, scallops wrapped in bacon, game hens, skewers of all sorts...

    I dunno, it is hard for me to define gourmet. We love simple food the most, baked whole fish, grilled steak... I would do more pickles if my husband liked them. I guess, for me gourmet starts with a really good high quality ingredients, cooked simply so the flavors come through, not muted by the long cooking necessary when the proteins are old or low quality.

    That's said, iw ould also browse books on particular cuisines in the library and think up substitutes if needed.
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